What improver snowboard?

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  • What improver snowboard?
  • Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    I’d like to buy my own board this year, have hired on previous years but always had a problem getting a decent board of the right size. I’m fairly keen to get a second hand one so I won’t get upset going over stones on it.

    I’m just under 6’5″ and have fairly big feet – UK 11, can’t remember the euro size of my salomon boots.

    I’ve done 3 weeks boarding and just like enjoying the pistes and some cheeky safe off piste, nothing rad like park or jumping.

    Totally baffled by the choices and lingo out there – any suggestions? Don’t want to spend a lot at the moment.

    peterfile
    Member

    How much do you weigh?

    plumber
    Member

    for everyday boarding – burton custom of your choice

    for powder – burton fish though you probably wont need this in Europe

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    I’m pretty thin, probably about 85kg in my gear?

    jools182
    Member

    Option were great snowboards, sadly they went out of business

    Their factory in Vancouver still makes snowboards though

    endeavor

    zion

    Daisy_Duke
    Member

    I bought a new Raven board last season on ebay. Got board and bindings for £200 plus p&p. I’d always hired my boards over the past ten years, but this is million times better than any hire board. More than likely come out of the same factory as many of the top brands but use last year’s designs and materials.

    peterfile
    Member

    I’m pretty thin, probably about 85kg in my gear?

    Be careful going too long or wide.

    If you have a look at the recommended weight for each length of a model of board, you’ll probably end up fitting into a smaller size than you’d expect (you’re quite light for 6’5″?).

    I’ve had a couple of boards that were too long for me (intentionally, for powder days), but if you don’t have enough weight behind you they are rubbish on the piste.

    You should be able to find recommended weights for all boards online.

    McHamish
    Member

    for everyday boarding – burton custom of your choice

    I don’t think I would have suggested a Burton Custom for an improver with 3 weeks boarding experience…although I don’t keep up with boards anymore so maybe they are no longer suitable for people with a fair amount of experience.

    I’ve currently got a 4 year old Rome Anthem which I like…hence the reason I don’t keep up with new boards anymore.

    I wouldn’t worry too much about going over rocks…get better at picking your path (look further ahead instead of directly in front of you), and practice little hops on flats to avoid rocks etc. Besides, like new phones every shiney new board eventually gets a ding which makes the owner relax and not worry about scratching it. Also, scratches from skis in lift queues are worse than rocks!

    With your weight and feet you don’t want to go too short…a bit shorter than 160 I think, but look at the guides for your board of choice. As an improver you probably don’t want a long freeride board as it’ll be stiff and harder to turn. Rentals tend to be freestyle boards as they’re soft and springy and easy to turn, so on a freeride board you might find your suddenly rubbish.

    You might have to get a wide board…I think Salomon boots come up small (as opposed to Vans), but 11 is pretty big for a standard width board. You might be able to get spacers, but I’ve never used them so not sure how successful these are.

    If you tend to go fast on piste you don’t want a pure freestyle board (although that’ll be easier to turn), as it’ll wobble a bit at speed. An all mountain board leaning towards freeride (such as the Anthem) would probably be a good choice, possibly around 158ish.

    If you prefer to pootle on piste, and like to ‘bugger about’ (i.e. practice little jumps etc) then you might choose an all mountain board that leans to freestyle.

    Me…I like to bugger about, but I also like the odd burst of speed. Plus my boarding buddies are fast, so I need a board that would keep up. The Anthem suits me fine.

    russ295
    Member

    After three weeks of snowboarding I would consider you a beginner.
    I’ve been riding 18 years and consider myself an early intermediate.
    A burton custom is a lot of board for beginner, although the over the last
    few years they have softened them a bit, but your going to have some
    problems with binding as they use a different hole pattern.
    Uk size 11 puts you on the boarder line for a wide board, which at your
    weight I would stay clear, what binding angles do use.
    Good boot choice.
    Some boards to consider.
    Atomic hatchet
    Ride agenda
    K2 dark star
    Rome? Not sure of their range but are great boards.

    peterfile
    Member

    A burton custom is a lot of board for beginner

    I’ve had a couple of customs over the years, I’m pretty sure Burton market it as an “advanced” board just to make sure people feel like they are getting value for money for their £500. I’ve always found it really easy to get on with (if a little dull).

    I would have thought that a large percentage of Burton’s target market don’t snowboard more than a couple of weeks a year, which can keep people in the “beginner/early intermediate category” for up to a decades or more…so they need to shift those “advanced” boards somehow.

    I’m in the same boat as you though, I’ve got somewhere between 50-60 weeks on snow and i’d struggle to call myself “advanced”.

    Re the binding hole pattern – I think Burton lost a challenge in the UK quite some time ago when they were refusing warranty claims on their boards where people had been using non burton bindings.

    I’d second your recommendation of the Ride Agenda and K2 Dark Star. 🙂

    speed12
    Member

    Bataleon Goliath or Whatever would be my suggestion – the TBT can be a bit marmite (to those who’ve tried it, but to those that haven’t as well…), but I found it to be ace. Really improved in terms of confidence, speed, control and generally everything. Virtually eliminating the slight fear of catching an edge just allows you to attempt a lot more than you normally would – well that was my findings anyway!

    klumpy
    Member

    The Canadian Dudes I bought my setup from said (somewhat tongue in cheek) that the order of importance was – Buy good bindings and boots (*that match up in intended purpose*) and then nail the bindings to a door.

    I don’t know point they were trying to get across, but the board is the big bit with the visible logos so I spent a grand on that, then bought some bungie cords and a pair of wellies. So should you.

    milleboy
    Member

    If your getting yourself confused give me or JT a shout at the shop 017687 80297.
    We don’t sell secondhand boards but we should be able to point you in the right direction and get you de baffled a bit.

    Steve

    speed12
    Member

    The Canadian Dudes I bought my setup from said (somewhat tongue in cheek) that the order of importance was – Buy good bindings and boots (*that match up in intended purpose*) and then nail the bindings to a door.

    Haha, interesting way of saying it, but that’s a very good point. If you haven’t got any of your own gear, then definitely definitely spend your money on a decent set of good-fitting boots before you buy a board. A nice board is great, but the difference between rental and your own boots is incomparable.

    uwe-r
    Member

    I would agree with spending the money on decent new boots, first, second hand decent bindings second and a board in useable condition last. The Boots binding combo is the most important for comfort and you will not be able to ride at all if they are in anyway not up to the job. The board is of less importance because 1, most boards are decent enough and will do a job, 2 boards get wrecked pretty quickly from lift queues, lifts etc and rocks in or under the snow which all end up scratching it. If the edges and base are ok and there is no sign of it delaminating then it should last long enough.

    gus
    Member

    Yeah like people are saying getting a pair of boots that you don’t know you have on will be the best think you do. I used to have a pair of K2 boots that I would ware to the supermarket after a day on the mountain. I have also owned some much more expensive boots which I never got on with. Foot pain can totally wreck your day.
    As for the board, don’t get sucked into the wide board thing. I have big feet ride a normal width board and have never had problems with toe drag.

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    thanks folks, I’ll have a mull later. I have Salomon boots already – I have very narrow feet and have had problems with foot pain and still some heel lift to sort out. I think I tend to tighten up the bindings too much to stop my feet moving in the boots and end up with numb feet. The Salomons were the best I could find though, I tried on lots of makes and models, just very narrow feet.

    I’m 6’3″ and a touch (93kg) heavier than you. I find going for the full recomended board size means I end up with quite a dull ride, I much prefer my 155 to my 162 unless it’s an absolute pow day. Just set a budget – you might find just about find something nice in a 2011/12 board on ebay or similar, look for an all mountain board or even a slightly stiffer park board, but don’t go too long.

    You might be able to get the boots fitting better with insoles ( in the inner boot) or heel wedges (between the outer boot and inner. Most boots pack down with use and need adjusting at some stage. Don’t spend to much chasing the fit (ie buying overpriced insoles from ski shops). Heel lift is more about technique than boot fit (think rocking the binding forward with your shin and a nicely bent knee instead of standing on tippy toes with a straight leg)

    Jones Flaghsip wide is what you want.

    best board out there… 😛
    Kept me safe in this rather steep couloir…

    packer
    Member

    I have very narrow feet too and I’ve tried lots of different boots over the years… best fit for narrow feet I’ve found by far are Northwave boots.
    I’ve had a couple of pairs now and I love them, would not buy another brand.
    Also they are not bulky so I have no problem using a standard width board with my size 11 feet.

    infidel
    Member

    Never Summer SL?

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)

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