What helps cuts heal?

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  • What helps cuts heal?
  • The use of cyanoacrylate glues in medicine was considered fairly early on. Eastman Kodak and Ethicon began studying whether the glues could be used to hold human tissue together for surgery. In 1964 Eastman submitted an application to use cyanoacrylate glues to seal wounds to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Soon afterward Dr. Coover’s glue did find use in Vietnam–reportedly in 1966 cyanoacrylates were tested on-site by a specially trained surgical team, with impressive results. According to an interview with Dr. Coover by the Kingsport Times-News:

    And it was used in Vietnam.

    It was used at Southampton General Hospital to glue my scalp back together after a little fight with gravity. easier than stiches on the head apparently.

    I thought the norm was vinegar and brown paper for head wounds?

    bigrich
    Member

    tumeric works a treat, apparently.

    Looks like I need a few more cuts to test out all these suggestions. I am off out for a ride.

    burmaboy
    Member

    warm water with table salt works very well.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    And it was used in Vietnam.

    Yup is used for closing wounds but not what it was invented for. We use it and it works very well indeed.

    warm water with table salt works very well.

    Care to explain why you think the salt adds any benefit?

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    Spider webs. Any pics?
    I need a laugh as my previous employer is being a t*t and not giving a reference. 😡

    avdave2
    Member

    So drac I take it salt has no benefit from your condescending reply. 🙂

    I find it very effective on mouth ulcers, hurts like hell for a few seconds and after that any further pain seems trivial. Probably of no medical benefit but that applies to a great many drugs and procedures.

    Sandwich – email me and I will give you a reference. What do you do?

    Premier Icon mudfish
    Subscriber

    Hia
    Calendula
    if painful, Hypericum and Calendula, sometimes labelled “HyperCal”
    skins a graze over nice and fast so, it needs to be well clean

    you can get the “mother tincture” [ooh madam] and make a liquid for bathing wounds.
    It’s homeopathic, where less really is more

    google: “Ainsworth’s Homeopathic Pharmacy” who also do some great stuff called “Injury”, tablet form for pain/ bruising/ healing. I think you have to ask for it, I get the 200 quality.

    n
    n

    Yup is used for closing wounds but not what it was invented for.

    It was it’s first PRACTICAL use, so it’s just semantics now…

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    So drac I take it salt has no benefit from your condescending reply

    None what so ever so just use normal water no need to suffer having salt in a wound.

    It was it’s first PRACTICAL use, so it’s just semantics now…

    First after being a general adhesive.

    DrJ
    Member

    So you need superglue and a salivating dog?

    Just be careful, or you will glue the dog to your tummy

    fbk
    Member

    It always amazes me how many people still think animal’s saliva has healing properties. Why do you think so many dogs have a “lamp shade” round their necks after surgery etc – trust me, the last thing you want is a dog licking any wound you may have (for the previously mentioned legal reasons as well as medical in some caes 🙂 ).

    Oh, and salt does seem to help if there’s any infection/discharge.

    Anyone got 2p for me?

    Vasaline appears to be winning at the moment.

    I am applying each one twice a day and it looks like the vasaline end of the cut is healing better. I will give it a couple more days for conclusive results.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Oh, and salt does seem to help if there’s any infection/discharge.

    Might seem to but it doesn’t.

    fbk
    Member

    Might seem to but it doesn’t.

    Care to elaborate?

    The theory behind using it seems sound and even if it “seems” to help, that keeps my patients happy and involves zero expense, which is the important thing.

    crikey
    Member

    The theory doesn’t seem sound when you give it more than a cursory glance.
    For any cut or abrasion to heal, new tissue has to grow into the gap created. That new tissue grows as cells are brought to the damaged area in tissue fluid; the exudate from the wound. Providing an environment where that tissue fluid and those cells can do their job is the quickest way to promote healing, hence the use of dressings that keep the area moist and undisturbed.
    Also included in that tissue fluid are white blood cells which mop up any bugs that are around, reducing infection.
    Sluicing the area down with any fluid other than something neutral like water will only disturb the delicate process of healing, washing away the new cells and spoiling the local environment, so the process has to begin all over again.

    Salt water may help to reduce the bacterial load, but in doing so it also messes up the healing process.

    Tis old wives tale, nothing more, and that’s why we don’t do it in hospitals anymore.

    fbk
    Member

    I guess things are a little different in human medicine.

    Agreed, you don’t want to disturb the normal cellular migration/WBC activity but when you’ve got a wound full of poo, saliva (bacteria) and pus, salt water does a nice job of cleaning, debriding (gently) and drawing out any purulent exudate. The benifits over normal water are possibly marginal but it “seems” to work better imho. And adding a little salt makes water no less “neutral” or abrasive.

    Modern dressings are always going to work better, providing your patient doesn’t chew/scratch them off and can afford the expense (god bless the NHS)

    This doesn’t help the OP though I suppose 🙂

    konabunny
    Member

    Piss and vinegar is the best antiseptic. (Well, it’s what I seem to use for most situations and I haven’t died yet, so…)

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Care to elaborate?

    No only thing working is the fact that your cleaning the wound, there is no benefit by adding salt.

    The theory behind using it seems sound and even if it “seems” to help, that keeps my patients happy and involves zero expense, which is the important thing.

    But plain water does just that and without the cost of adding salt.

    Crikey goes on to explain it in more detail but basically that’s the reason.

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