Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 40 total)
  • What can be done about rising rising inflection levels?
  • Premier Icon thegeneralist
    Full Member

    It seems more and more people, mainly the younger ones, have adopted this intensely irritating habit of voicing statements as question during conversation or on calls?

    I guess it might have come from YouTube, but it’s now impossible to get on a call and focus on what’s being said without thinking everything’s a question.

    After a few minutes of this it’s impossible to follow any more and so I just have to zone off?
    Then someone asks me a question…. 👿🤬😠

    Why do people feel the need to do this? Why can’t they just speak properly and adopt the conventions that we already have to support efficient verbal communication?

    Boils my piss.

    Oh, and to save the first replier the bother….

    Premier Icon thegeneralist
    Full Member

    OK Boomer

    Premier Icon thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Or rather….

    OK Boomer?

    Premier Icon devash
    Free Member

    Wrong website, let alone forum. Daily Heil’s over that way ——>

    Premier Icon esselgruntfuttock
    Free Member

    I agree. There’s a woman at work who does this with every single sentence, like, ‘well I bought a bag of potatoes the other day?’
    She’s a nice person but bloody annoying with this!

    Premier Icon colournoise
    Full Member

    Australian question intonation?

    Been around for years?

    Premier Icon Superficial
    Free Member

    I, for one, blame Pri-ey Patel?

    Premier Icon zzjabzz
    Free Member

    I guess adopting and encouraging a great diversity in culture changes the way language is used…

    Premier Icon wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    I’d either swerve it or if that wasn’t possible have a vaccination?

    Premier Icon piemonster
    Free Member

    Then someone asks me a question….

    You sure about that.

    Premier Icon Rockhopper
    Free Member

    Same here – I find it intensely annoying.

    Premier Icon retrorick
    Full Member

    I’ve had a similar situation recently where questions and statements were mixed up. They came from someone in their early 40s and it was the first time I’d had encountered it as far as I could remember 🤔.
    I need to expand my abilities 😭

    Premier Icon wzzzz
    Free Member

    I came home from uni once having started talking like that.

    I had no idea.

    My dad set me straight, why are you bloody talking like that?

    Then I realised and consciously stopped doing it.

    maybe the people doing this don’t realise they are doing it?

    Premier Icon wheelsonfire1
    Full Member

    Just get over it, different accents and ways of speaking are what makes life interesting. Or do you think we should all be using Received Pronunciation?

    Premier Icon reeksy
    Full Member

    It is annoying. I do it.
    But it is also how language evolves. The chameleon effect is where we mimic other speakers.
    If the language didn’t evolve we’d all be pronouncing English the way it is written and then where would we be?

    Premier Icon binners
    Full Member

    I worked with an Australian girl who used to not only do it at the end of every single sentence, but sometimes mid-sentence too.

    So every sentence? Sounded like two questions? Yeah?

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Free Member

    Hel-lo? This should be in the annoyingly disproportionate thread.

    Premier Icon argee
    Full Member

    Pfft, that’s not even an issue, I prefer people who ask a question in such a hypothetical way that they answer it themselves just before finishing the question 😁

    Premier Icon esselgruntfuttock
    Free Member

    This should be in the annoyingly disproportionate thread.

    I couldn’t agree more?

    Premier Icon blokeuptheroad
    Full Member

    I thought it was called ‘upspeak’.  I do find it mildly irritating, but I don’t come across that many people who do it, so it’s not really a problem.  To my ears it makes the speaker sound as if they lack confidence and are really unsure about everything, because everything they say sounds like a question.  Isn’t this just something impressionable teens and twenty somethings do, then grow out of it?

    Premier Icon thestabiliser
    Free Member

    Zone OFF? Really? Is that, like, even, a thing?

    Premier Icon imnotverygood
    Full Member

    It’s not new though is it? I went out with an Australian girl in the late 80’s? She spoke like that all the time?

    Premier Icon Fat-boy-fat
    Full Member

    Definitely an Aussie thing that has spread. My Mrs does it after living over there? Annoys the ever living cr4p out of me. Cue pernickety me correcting grammar and diction; which is always welcome.

    Premier Icon Beagleboy
    Full Member

    I’m with Upspeak on this one. I work with a lot of young post grad students, and hear this a lot. I’d put this mannerism down to a simple, youthful, lack of confidence.

    Premier Icon sirromj
    Free Member

    Zone OFF? Really? Is that, like, even, a thing?

    No it’s over, and out.

    Premier Icon frankconway
    Full Member

    I would put it down to stupidity and the inability to think clearly

    Premier Icon andrewh
    Free Member

    Why do Australians go up at the end of a sentence?
    It’s only logical, it was going down at the beginning of one which got most of them there🤷‍♂️

    Premier Icon bikesandboots
    Full Member

    I don’t know?

    I’d put this mannerism down to a simple, youthful, lack of confidence.

    Yes, it conveys uncertainty about what is being said, and perhaps seems some confirmation or validation from the listener?

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    Recently? The Californian rising inflection gained traction here from Buffy the Vampire Slayer and that was 25 years ago.

    Premier Icon batfink
    Full Member

    It’s not an Australian thing….. it’s a young-people thing.

    In my view, related to confidence.

    The Californian rising inflection gained traction here from Buffy the Vampire Slayer and that was 25 years ago.

    This, but see also: Dawson’s creek, The OC, gossip girl – basically whatever the American Holyoaks-equivalent is for the current crop of impressionable teenagers.

    Premier Icon BruceWee
    Full Member

    This seems to be my answer to pretty much every problem with the UK these days but you should move to Norway (or consider campaigning to adopt Norwegian policies).

    In Norway inflection can and does rise and fall several times at any point in a single sentence whether a question is being asked or not.

    Norway also shows that you don’t even have to be in the EU to implement this policy successfully.

    Premier Icon BillMC
    Full Member

    It comes from soap operas, the inflection thing coincided with Neighbours, Home and Away and the ‘I was like’ thing came in with Friends. It does make conversation very samey and boring.

    Premier Icon igm
    Full Member

    Given year-on-year inflection is now running at over 9%, I understand ONS estimates are that within 5 years the end of sentences will be outside the audible range for many people.

    Premier Icon igm
    Full Member

    PS wasn’t the Californian version referred to somewhat derogatively by other Californians as “valley girl”?

    I recall Frank Zappa taking the mick.

    Premier Icon thepodge
    Free Member

    There’s a guy I work with who thinks in emails question marks are full stops.

    Me: how long should the sides be?
    Him: the sides are 500?
    Me: I don’t know that’s what I’m asking.
    Him: I’ve measured them?
    Me: you’re on site next to them. You said you’d measure them & let me know.
    Him: I have measured them?
    Me: aaaarrrrgggghhh.

    He’s mid 50s so its not just the kids.

    Premier Icon jamesoz
    Full Member

    Given year-on-year inflection is now running at over 9%, I understand ONS estimates are that within 5 years the end of sentences will be outside the audible range for many people.

    Made me chuckle.

    Premier Icon smiffy
    Full Member

    In Wales nearly every sentence sound like a question, bit in a non-annoying way. The exception is Newport where nothing ever sounds like a question because they ask a question by making a statement to see if you challenge it. It took me a while to get that one when I worked there.

    Premier Icon chewkw
    Free Member

    Why do people feel the need to do this? Why can’t they just speak properly and adopt the conventions that we already have to support efficient verbal communication?

    Lack of confidence or self-esteem perhaps is the answer.

    When a friend started to speak with inflection to me with no reason I double up my inflection in my reply like Stewie (from Family guy) to see who could win the battle of inflection … somehow they stopped after that. LOL!

    Premier Icon ChrisL
    Full Member

    I remember Stephen Fry (I think) railing against this on Room 101 in the 1990s. He called it Australian Question Intonation. If it was causing irritation back then then it’s hardly something confined to the young today, no doubt some of the people doing it back then will be in their 40s now.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Surely, now we’ve left the EU, we can bring back hanging for this sort of thing?

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 40 total)

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