Viewing 21 posts - 1 through 21 (of 21 total)
  • VW Transporter design/engineering/DIY tinkering
  • Premier Icon RustyNissanPrairie
    Full Member

    Another day today of cursing Ford ‘engineering’ whilst changing a front wheel bearing. The design is so **** stupid with no consideration for anyone in years to come when fixing it. Every job has been the same – rear diff, rear discs, wishbone, front wheel bearings etc etc. Penny pinching and speed of assembly are clearly all that mattered.

    I also have an older Volvo and the amount of thought and consideration for future repair is brilliant – I love working on it.

    So, I was wondering what VW T5’s are like from a repairability/engineering point – I’m not bothered about reliability, resale values or being part of a scene, I just want a ideally galvanized van that has at least a tiny little forethought for some poor bugger lying underneath it swearing in years to come.

    Are you happy to work on them? or would you prefer a gallon of petrol and a box of matches.

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    T4s are better and easier in my opinion.

    Traffics n that breed are shit

    Premier Icon RustyNissanPrairie
    Full Member

    Vito’s are also on my list if anyone has one of them and tinkers it themselves.

    However I don’t know if all modern vehicle’s/vans suffer from it – speed of manufacture over ease of repair.

    Premier Icon welshfarmer
    Full Member

    Had my T5 for a few years now. Done full suspension change, wheel bearing, abs sensors, suspension bushes, a CV joint, water pump and cam belt, new sump (don’t ask!), Dpf sensor and probably a few other things. Nothing was terribly complex. Some jobs were only possible with correct special tools (borrowed).

    Premier Icon alpin
    Full Member

    I’ve a T5. Never had a problem when replacing the driveshafts, the aircon cogs/belts, the rear discs and pads, oil changes, general servicing, etc…. Well, not a problem other than paying my mechanic to fix it.

    Edit…. Mechanic moans about the fact there’s so little room to get your hands into the engine bay given it’s a 2.5 lump and there is very little free space under the bonnet.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    It’s noticeable how thought through our Volvo is for service compared to any other car. I doubt any van will be similar to the Ovlov.

    Modern cars and vans all seem the same from a pain in the arse to fix, complex parts and not designed for service.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Some jobs were only possible with correct special tools

    That’s how you know it was a VW. That is not specific to their t5s. I curse working on most models as even what I consider to be normally quite simple jobs on other cars are made to need special tools that often don’t cope well with corrosion. Tri square I’m looking at you

    Oh and then theirs their love of mixingmettalirgies across the periodic table so you end up with welded in bolts.

    At least when your dealing with a Suzuki it’s all rusted up fully …..but it’s all steel and you can get rough with it.

    Premier Icon RustyNissanPrairie
    Full Member

    ^thanks, have just googled XZN triple square fasteners. They look like a really good candidate to rust and round out. But they’ll save 5seconds assembly time per van opposed to a hex head😖

    That’s VW off the list.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    You’ll find something from pretty much every van manufacturer that will take them all off the list.

    And those moaning about space to work, try aircraft engines! Changing out a cracked fuel manifold under cowls at 3am, when the combustor is still pinging due to the heat, and every pipe you’re squeezing your arms in between is the same. 🤣

    I know a guy at GE Nantgarw who is about 8 stone soaking wet, and as such is the man to squeeze into the exhaust of the GE90 to change out LPT balance weight clips. Wraps his arms in rags (cos it’s hotter than the sun) breathes out, and someone pushes him in. Then breathes out and they pull him out when he’s done! 🙈

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Without mentioning what I have… I’d look at vans made by truck manufacturers….. People who are judged on hours on the road rather than what mods are availible….. Mpg not a strong point and you won’t get it under the height barriers at the office but they are made to be repaired quicker….. The parts ain’t cheap mind.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    know a guy at GE Nantgarw who is about 8 stone soaking wet, and as such is the man to squeeze into the exhaust of the GE90 to change out LPT balance weight clips. Wraps his arms in rags (cos it’s hotter than the sun) breathes out, and someone pushes him in. Then breathes out and they pull him out when he’s done! 🙈

    As an asside I’d love to see the SOP & RA for that job . I assume it starts like most complex operations in a Haynes manual…..”simply”

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Na, supposed to wait 90 minutes for the engine arse end to cool, but he’s a very ‘can do’ type.

    Premier Icon phil5556
    Full Member

    Mechanic moans about the fact there’s so little room to get your hands into the engine bay given it’s a 2.5 lump and there is very little free space under the bonnet.

    I had one until recently and things were a bit tight but everything came apart to give access. The alternator was the biggest ball ache to get to.
    I got very quick at changing the turbo after some issues, I think I did it 3 or 4 times.

    Premier Icon jake123
    Free Member

    Get a Hiace instead.
    More reliable and you don’t have to pay ‘VW scene tax’

    Premier Icon 5lab
    Free Member

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a cab-forward design that I’d catagorise as ‘easy to work on’.

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    My Leyland DAF200 is very easy to work on as it’s old fashioned

    Premier Icon welshfarmer
    Full Member

    [strong]trail_rat[/strong] wrote:

    Without mentioning what I have… I’d look at vans made by truck manufacturers…

    Have you tried working on the fuel pump on an Iveco? Best bet is to cut a hole in the foot well to gain access 🙂

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    Have you tried working on the fuel pump on an Iveco? Best bet is to cut a hole in the foot well to gain access 🙂

    I have so im confused by your statement – if it rings true my engines in backwards.

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    Fuel pumps on the f1a and f1c are at the front too.

    Rear timing chain on the f1c is a pig

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    Old 307 / 207 Merc van?
    Will be slow but if you’re ok with keeping the body work going should keep on running.

    Premier Icon welshfarmer
    Full Member

    [strong]trail_rat[/strong] wrote:

    I have so im confused by your statement – if it rings true my engines in backwards.

    Ah, so they changed the design on the newer models then 🙂 Mine was the previous model

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