VW Golf GTD estate. Got one? Tell me about it.

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  • VW Golf GTD estate. Got one? Tell me about it.
  • We’ve been bouncing around in a Panda for about 18 months now. We needed an affordable first car for my girlfriend and it was perfect but I’m properly sick of it now that it’s our only vehicle. I’m sick of bikes on roof bars, lumpy seats, zero suspension, wind noise, crackly FM radio etc.

    After months of going back and forth between vans and cars we’d decided that the absolute perfect vehicle would be a Golf GTD estate. Then we went to test drive one and ohmygod, it was like going from a bobsled to a private jet. I aimed for every drain cover, pothole and speed bump and I never once clashed my teeth or bounced my head off the roof. Plus we could speak using our indoor voices. I’ve always had “classic” cars or outright bangers so I think I’ve waited long enough for some comfort. Plus it was nice to overtake a few lorries without taking a run up.

    I want to go and see a few more examples. This one had been neglected and was covered in scuffs and dings.

    Issues…

    DSG. Really nice to drive with but apparently jerky and slow around town and doing maneuvers. Still have a reputation for being unreliable and horrifically expensive to fix.

    Panoramic roof. Haven’t seen one in the flesh yet but they look amazing. But, some people online call them the ‘sprinkler system’ due to leaks and apparently they can creak quite a bit. Again, hugely expensive to fix.

    It’s a diesel. Doesn’t bother me now but it might be worthless in 4 or 5 years. Lots of talk of them being banned from city centres etc. Regardless of whether it happens or not, it’s going to put people off buying them. Might end up stuck with it forever.

    Alternative…

    There is no petrol GTi style estate so just sack up and buy an R. Never been in one but they seem universally loved/well reviewed. Much bigger loan and a bit full-on for my girlfriends daily commute.

    Just buy a Gti 5 door hatch. Should still swallow a Geometron with the wheels off. Hopefully. Then again, I’m not in love with Golf’s in general so any 5 door hatch would do the job. Still much prefer sexy wagons.

    Just thinking out loud at this point. Pictures, experiences, horror stories most welcome. Not interested in ‘bangernomics’, I’ve been doing that my whole life. Don’t fancy making the mrs. commute in a Volvo 240 or something and it has to be stress free on the annual Alps trip.

    Pictures of big enduro weapons squeezed into boots will be great.

    johndoh
    Member

    Can only comment on the DSG gearbox – they have improved the response time recently but I had one in an A6 (63 plate) and I utterly hated it to hell and back. I couldn’t wait to get shot of the car when the lease was up mainly because pulling out of busy junctions was a lottery – it either kinda slowly moved away after a big. . . . . . pause or, if I floored it harder, went off like a rocket (it was a 3.0l V6 diesel).

    I know others do love them though, so I am prepared for others to completely disagree with me but I have gone straight back to a manual.

    Premier Icon thepurist
    Subscriber

    I looked at the Golf estate but ended up with the stereotypical Octavia instead.  It’s not quite as plush as the golf up front but it was far more practical as an estate car (bigger opening at the back to post bikes through for starters).  DSG works best if you can allow it to engage at tickover revs then accelerate, ie anticipate the maneuvre rather than just ‘GO NOW!’ when it’s a bit neck snappy.  Yes they’re expensive to fix but i think most reliability trouble was on early versions in more powerful models with clutches that weren’t up to the loads they were dealing with, but the stories are perpetuated.

    Premier Icon simon_g
    Subscriber

    I had an R wagon, the Golf estate is a really nice size/shape – not too big but plenty roomy enough for bikes and family stuff.

    DSG does take a bit of getting used to – it can do anything from gentle creep to drag race start and the only way it can figure out what you want (thus how fast to engage the clutches) is from how you press the throttle.

    Wouldn’t buy a diesel these days unless doing huge mileage.

    Try the clones like STW favourite Octavia instead (there’s a GTI-engined petrol), or the Seat Leon ST which has been available with most of the VW group petrol engines – the 1.8 178bhp petrol is nice, 7.7s 0-60 but still pretty economical.

    Or if you do a lot of shorter trips, have somewhere to charge it, and the 5 door is OK then try the Golf GTE too. Can save you a fortune in fuel, preheats in the winter, still takes a bike easily in the back. Really like ours.

    pedlad
    Member

    I’m driving a 2016 GTD estate and really like it. Does everything I need it to in terms of
    the boring stuff, relaxed, smooth, economical (50-54mpg if gentle on a 50 mile plus run), load carrying (it’s got properly big capacity if you take the floor and dividers out).

    It then goes (as fast as I would want to on the public roads) when you want to squirt it along. 184bhp I think. Inside is a very nice place to be as a driver in a (faux?) slightly sporty GTI way.

    DSG is my first experience and I like that too. Agree it is not the smoothest around town and it

    SG works best if you can allow it to engage at tickover revs then accelerate, ie anticipate the maneuvre rather than just ‘GO NOW!’

    I think the “dry” early versions had issues but these later “wet” ones are better just make sure you give them their 40k fluid service.

    Or if you do a lot of shorter trips, have somewhere to charge it, and the 5 door is OK then try the Golf GTE too. Can save you a fortune in fuel, preheats in the winter, still takes a bike easily in the back. Really like ours.

    Our next vehicle might very well be electric but not this one. We’ve got a few electric cars and vans at work and they’re amazing, I’m totally sold on them.

    Currently we’re trying to stick to one vehicle and we regularly do long weekends away with bikes and tents and we’ve done summer in Europe every year now for quite a while. I’m very keen to find myself on an Alpine pass in an R one day.

    So a GTE, yes, maybe in a few years.

    I did really like Octavia’s I’m just sick of the sight of them! Great cars no doubt and a blue VRS is very handsome. It’s just that every other taxi in Sheffield is an Octavia wagon. I’ll still check one out if I see a nice one locally.

    I’m driving a 2016 GTD estate and really like it. Does everything I need it to in terms of
    the boring stuff, relaxed, smooth, economical (50-54mpg if gentle on a 50 mile plus run), load carrying (it’s got properly big capacity if you take the floor and dividers out).

    It then goes (as fast as I would want to on the public roads) when you want to squirt it along. 184bhp I think. Inside is a very nice place to be as a driver in a (faux?) slightly sporty GTI way.

    That’s exactly why I want one. It ticks every box. I’m just nervous about spending 10 to 15k on a diesel when everyone is turning against them (The one we test drove was 12500).

    P-Jay
    Member

    I’ve got the same Engine (well technically mine is the slightly revised one with 190bhp) and DSG box in my Superb as the GTD, mine is also 4×4, do that offer than in the Golf?

    Anyway, the box is mint imho, it changes gear seamlessly in Eco/Drive mode, it’s faster but a bit more noticeable in Sport and there’s a bit more of donk in manual mode, which you’ll use exactly once.

    The biggest gripes of mine with DSG are:

    In Drive and especially in Eco mode it wants to pull off in 2nd, which is great for economy (but it’s emissions it chases) unless you put your boot down which is pretty unnatural if you’re used to manual cars, at first if say you’re at a busy roundabout and need to move away fast you’ll pull off think “oh crap, I need to be quicker than this” put your boot down, when it’ll shift back to first and take longer – gear changes can be 8 milliseconds, but most of the time they’re much slower for the sake of smoothness. It took me a few day to get used to it, either you put your foot down a bit more to make it pull away in 1st, or stick it in sport for busy junctions (you just pull the gear selector back). Once you get used to it it’s blindingly quick 0-20 to get out of junctions and stuff, you’d never manage the same with a manual.

    If you’re driving hard it will hold onto gears all the way to the red line, makes no sense in a diesel, the end of the rev range does nothing, then it drops about mid-way into the torque band of the next gear, it would be faster and smoother to shift up earlier. you can over-ride it with the paddles.

    It’s completely seamless around town and parking, apart from the overly-keen stop-start, combined with auto-brake it makes it a doddle in traffic etc. The stop-start is a dick as keeps stopping when you’re moving very slowly, restarting etc – I’m sure it’s less efficient than actually only stopping when you’ve stopped, you can sort of manage it by not braking too firmly but it doesn’t seem safe to me. I refuse to turn off because I know they’re bad in cities, but it could be better.

    Oh, and Bristol has banned diesels completely (starting 2021) including most of the routes to the Airport, doesn’t matter if it’s a 90s spec soot blower or a brand new Euro6, total blanket ban, so consider that.

    Oh, and Bristol has banned diesels completely (starting 2021) including most of the routes to the Airport, doesn’t matter if it’s a 90s spec soot blower or a brand new Euro6, total blanket ban, so consider that.

    That’s one of the news stories that put the willies up me after the test drive. Sheffield is also going into clean air consultation stages and there’s talk of banning vans etc from the city centre. I think the writing’s on the wall.

    mrb123
    Member

    A Seat Leon Estate (ST) with the 150hp petrol engine would be worth considering too.

    P-Jay
    Member

    That’s one of the news stories that put the willies up me after the test drive. Sheffield is also going into clean air consultation stages and there’s talk of banning vans etc from the city centre. I think the writing’s on the wall.

    Yep me too, I’m not sure if it passed me by, or it didn’t get much national coverage leading up to it (there have been very few quiet news days for years) but it shocked me.

    Even when I saw the headline I expected them to have banned the older diesels, my Euro6 is able to enter the London ULEZ without a charge.

    The Bristol thing itself isn’t a major issue, apart from the fact it cuts off the major routes to the airport which I do use.

    Seem daft though, I went to see my mate’s new car last night, 600bhp of twin-turbo V8 powered RS6, turns petrol into noise at a terrific rate, not affected by the ban at all. His 1.6tdi Estate car he uses for work, banned. It’s very different to the story we’ve been being told for 2 decades now about Co2 emissions.

    pedlad
    Member

    Unlike above I do use the DSG manual mode, as well as all the others at various points – just think it’s a fantastic bit of engineering and don’t miss a manual ‘box at all.

    Back to golf GTD it is the first VW I’ve driven that doesn’t want to understeer you off the road when speed exceeds grip a little bit. I think it has some inside wheel-braking, pretend LSD electronics from the GTI. Not sure if the Skoda or Seat variants have that or not.

    nbt
    Member

    just ticking this as we are looking for a new estate – pehaps a bit bigger than you as we’ll occassionlly be towing 1300kg with it, so looking at:
    BmW 3 series touring
    Skoda Superb
    VW Passat
    Ford Mondeo
    Kia Optima

    Audi A4 is out of our price range really, as is the latest facelift of the V60 (the previous V60 doesn’t appeal at all, don’t know why)

    Similar concerns about petrol v diesel, but less bothered about it being exciting and good at “making progress”

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Subscriber

    Does the GTD have the dry or wet clutch DSG box? Should be the wet one, I’ve just bought a skoda superb and it is, well… Superb.

    2.0tdi DSG 150, 48mpg on the current tank with 2/3rds of the driving in town, 55mpg is easy on a motorway run. The dsg gearbox is extremely good, no jerking or issues at all.

    I considered the GTD for a few seconds, also the Passat but the superb was way ahead in terms of spec and space.

    Mine is the top of the range L&K model, oodles of torque, heated front and rear seats, electronic suspension, adaptive cruise control, active lane assist (motorway driving is so easy, 2 hours feels like 20 minutes), 12 speaker canton stereo, android auto/apple carplay, factory retractable towbar, automatic high beam which blanks out oncoming and cars you’re following, heated windscreen, and so on.

    My XXL 29 Jeffsy will fit in the back, seats down, with just the front wheel off, but as it has the cream leather interior I’m going for a towbar rack just to make life much easier with not having to chuck a bike covered in mud in the back. Also makes weekend camping trips much easier not having to cram my tent/camping bedchair in along with the bike, and I can take both my mtb and gravel bike.


    Yes, yes, very nice. That’s the kind of environment I’m looking for after years of sliding around in various 70’s and 80’s coupes. Got that stuff well out of my system. Can’t wait to join the 21st century.

    I think being realistic it’ll probably be early next year now but I plan to drive as many VAG wagons as I can get my hands on. There’s 2 GTD’s and 2 R’s at the same dealer half an hour down the road so if we’re not busy in the morning I’ll check them out.

    jimw
    Member

    If suspension comfort is a priority, then you might find an R estate a bit on the firm side unless it has the DCC option, especially if it has 19″ wheels. It is well damped but ‘busy’ at lower speeds on a typical UK road surface.in my experience it’s acceptable. Once you get up to speed where appropriate it is great, especially on motorways.

    Premier Icon cakeandcheese
    Subscriber

    I have been driving a 2018 R estate for the last 20 months.

    It’s ok. I’d probably take the GTD if it weren’t for impending diesel bans (like Bristol), or a superb petrol, or a Leon.

    It is very fast, too fast really. To have a bit of fun you’re driving at very irresponsible speeds, so I tend to pootle about not making the most of the power.

    Practicality wise two bikes with the front wheels off and two people go in quite comfortably. Had two bike boxes in it to the airport too. I like the cloth interior, mine is perpetually filthy from biking gear but if it does get a clean then a Hoover tends to get it good as new. I Spec’d the dynaudio which is good, not brilliant though.

    Oh, and regularly get >40mpg on a run which I thought was quite good.

    ETA: Mine is the 7spd dsg which I understand is a decent leap from the 6spd. I believe a dsg map and a throttle mod can work wonders too.

    Premier Icon tall_martin
    Subscriber

    I went from a 1.6 Honda Civic diesel estate and tried a gtd estate.

    It was fine, but no faster than the civic, It’s turning circle was massive and the 3 year old one I looked at had scratches on every panel.

    If I was going for a golf estate I’d probably go for a slower one as the gtd. The extra speed didn’t seem worth the extra cost.

    I ended up with a Bmw 335d estate. This threw me a £2000 bill which was later refunded by bmw as it was a recall issue. It’s since eaten £500 of tyres and £800 of brakes in a year. I’m wishing I’d gone for something with less miles and cheaper to run, unless I’m driving when I’m a very happy bunny.

    I did 60k in the civic in 3 years. It had 2 tyres and normal servicing in that time.

    Theres a good chance my next car will be a civic estate.

    Premier Icon tall_martin
    Subscriber

    Oh and an xl geometron fits in the civic and bmw with the front wheel off and both back seats down😀

    Premier Icon somafunk
    Subscriber

    Can’t comment on the golf aspect but i’ve got a new Tiguan 2.0 diesel with DSG, I drove it as standard for the first 2000 odd miles but i’ve since had the gearbox/engine remapped and it’s now far better, the throttle response pick up/dsg gear change is vastly improved, the kick down gear change is instant and the gearbox is no longer hunting/searching for the right gear to be in.

    Still not comparable to the DSG gearbox in a mates Audi SQ5 but i guess thats to be expected.

    andypaul
    Member

    I went from a 1.6 Honda Civic diesel estate and tried a gtd estate.

    Are you sure it was a GTD? It should have been way quicker than the Civic

    mindmap3
    Member

    I had a vRS diesel for fours years, so pretty similar to the GTD but bigger.

    The engine is fine, it’s plenty brisk enough but in typical VAG diesel fashion it dumps a load of grunt early on and then had nothing. I often wished I’d have got the DSG because the power band was so narrow (and I’m not even a DSG fan preferring the ZF8). Fuel economy was pretty good averaging 47.9 over four years.

    I wouldn’t dismiss the vRS personally. Mine was a great car. Not exciting or fun but it was so easy to live with. It’d easily swallow two big DH bikes plus gear with space to spare. Spec was good, comfy enough etc. Servicing etc seemed cheap enough.

    bent udder
    Member

    We went from a Golf to an Octavia Estate when Udderlet 2 arrived. It eventually died at 130k – it was a 1.4 TSI petrol model. We’ve just replaced it with a ’17 plate 1.4 TSI and will likely go electric once that dies.

    We buy on vfm not badge, and it’s noticeable how much more reasonable the equivalent Skoda model is to the VW or Audi version. The difference between our ’06 Golf 1.9 TDI to the ’09 Octy was one thing, really: the cruise control switch worked the opposite way. That’s it. Obviously a bit more perky as a petrol engined car, but it was noticeable how similar it was.

    Honda and Toyota also looked good and are probably even better VFM, but load carrying is important to us and only the equivalent Peugeot estate has a bigger boot in that class.

    This time we looked at the Golf estate, Seat Leon estate and the other options in the same class, and the Octavia still won.

    I’d strongly suggest giving an Octy or Superb a test drive. They’re popular with cab companies for a very good reason, the same as Merc estates used to be. I appreciate it’s not for everyone, and I do have friends who have bought Audis or similar, but I simply can’t justify spending that sort of money on something that will just devalue.

    We loved our Golf, and it’s a really good choice. Buy what you like, be happy. 🙂

    pedlad
    Member

    @tallmartin

    I went from a 1.6 Honda Civic diesel estate and tried a gtd estate.
    It was fine, but no faster than the civic,

    That wasn’t a healthy GTD you tried. From Autocar re 1.6d civic

    While it’s not particularly quick – it dispatches the 0-62mph dash in a leisurely 10.5 seconds

    The GTD does that in about 7.
    Apple and pears in terms of performance.

    Premier Icon ta11pau1
    Subscriber

    Agree with that – a 2017 Golf GTD estate with under 40k miles is around 15-£16k.

    A 2017 Superb SE L executive (2 down from the top level: SE L -> Sportline -> L&K) with under 40k miles is around £17k.

    The Superb is basically a Passat with a different badge, oh and umbrellas in the doors 😀

    An Octavia VRS would be worth a look as an alternative to the GTD.

    Inbred456
    Member

    I’ve got the Seat Leon ST FR 184. Same engine as GTD. Golf is slightly bigger in the back due to a squared off rear end. Leon is more sloped. DSG in the 2.0 TDI’s are fine. Early ones were 6 speed wet clutch, later ones are 7 speed wet clutch. All need servicing at 30-40K. The 7 speed dry clutch DQ200 as used in all the lower torque petrols (1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8) and 1.6 diesels are weak. The 1.5 petrol now has the DQ381 as fitted to 2.0 Tsi’s. I have all the specs somewhere. Our old Fabia 1.2 Tsi had the DQ200. It was never right from day one. Great car and engine but clutch was like a switch on or off.

    P-Jay
    Member

    The Superb is basically a Passat with a different badge, oh and umbrellas in the doors 😀

    It’s not really, VW’s platform sharing is more complex now, it’s not 4 versions of the same car with different bumpers anymore.

    I’m sure the new Passat is a decent size but Superbs are massive, it’s also a hatch and Passats are saloons. (I do have umbrellas in the doors though 😉)

    I love mine, I paid £20k for a 2.5 year old 190bhp 4×4 Sportline hatch, I wanted an estate but they were hard to find and the boot is massive anyway. The residuals that VWFS offered were massive so it’s a cheap PCP deal, £0 deposit and a decent mileage.

    It’s a lovely big thing to cruise about in, it’s not heavy (relatively) so it’s not too thirsty but it’s a sod in car parks, it’s too long to fit in a normal supermarket parking bay without hanging out the end and old school NCPs are terrifying. It’s shit on speed bumps.

    luv2ride
    Member


    SEAT Leon ST FR 150 petrol here, since Sept. Rigged something so can carry road or gravel bike inside without front wheel, but still carry a rear passenger if needed

    Engine seems really smooth after coming from 150 TDci diesel,liking it so far, especially the funky digital dash

    Premier Icon sparkyrhino
    Subscriber

    Yup take a seat in a Seat st fr184.save some cash

    Premier Icon pondo
    Subscriber

    Can’t speak about estates or DSG boxes but had a manual GTD as a company tool for a bit and it was ace. Quick enough to make progress but pliable enough to be comfy in slower traffic or if you’re in no hurry. Adaptive cruise is mega if you do a load of miles. 🙂

    mikertroid
    Member

    I pickup a Leon ST Cupra at the end of the month. Super practical sleeper that’s got the 7 speed DSG, coupled with an economical petrol engine.

    Originally intended to replace my 325i touring, but shall hang on to the Beemer until I get a van for bike/surf duties.

    Premier Icon tall_martin
    Subscriber

    @tallmartin

    I went from a 1.6 Honda Civic diesel estate and tried a gtd estate.
    It was fine, but no faster than the civic,

    That wasn’t a healthy GTD you tried. From Autocar re 1.6d civic

    While it’s not particularly quick – it dispatches the 0-62mph dash in a leisurely 10.5 seconds

    The GTD does that in about 7.
    Apple and pears in terms of performance.

    I went from a 1.6 Honda Civic diesel estate and tried a gtd estate.

    Are you sure it was a GTD? It should have been way quicker than the Civic

    Yep. Definitely a GTD. Definitely should have felt faster. That GTD really did not feel it. Tried a GTi performance pack (non estate) the same day and that felt loads quicker than the GTD. I guess the GTi was about 6 something to 60.

    The GTD was 3 years old with 40,000 miles. It had EVERY single panel scratched. Inside and out! Who scratches the speedo cover? Who touches the speedo cover? Every door handle? All of the inside of the boot? After a main dealer preparation it still had mud and gubbins everywhere that was just out of sight! I thought if it had been treated like that cosmetically it would have had 0 mechanical sympathy and walked away.

    pedlad
    Member

    Sounds like the turbo was blown.

    The one we went to see was a bit like that. Bumps and scrapes on every single panel, every wheel kerbed. It looked like it was used and abused then traded in. Nothing wrong with the power delivery though. It had a surprising amount of shove.

    Wouldn’t buy one like that though.

    mindmap3
    Member

    The one we went to see was a bit like that. Bumps and scrapes on every single panel, every wheel kerbed. It looked like it was used and abused then traded in. Nothing wrong with the power delivery though. It had a surprising amount of shove.

    Wouldn’t buy one like that though.

    Lots will be ex-lease cars and probably not all that cared for.

    Those BMW costs put me off having a newer, higher end car tbh, much as I’d like one.

    My old 08 plate civic was in the local garage last week, new rear discs and pads, oil and filters changed,and a new ABS sensor – 260 quid all in.

    It’s not fast in the slightest (1.8 petrol), but has all the toys, leather interior, and has a huge boot, love the flat folded seats too.

    My Golf GTD company car is coming up to 3 years old and in that time it has clocked up 82k miles.
    Best car I’ve had. I’m genuinely sorry to be handing it back.

    CountZero
    Member

    and the 3 year old one I looked at had scratches on every panel.

    That’s not an issue with the car, rather with the previous owner! Sounds like an ex-Motability to me, you should see the state of the 67-plate Volvo V40 that came in this week; cream leather interior, and it looks and smells like the owner had kept the dog in the back – the rear seats were filthy and the carpet was white with dog hair.
    But then we had a Kuga come in, three years old, a bit over 1000 miles on the clock, and spotless condition!

    Premier Icon v8ninety
    Subscriber

    I’ve had two GTDs on lease; would just like to point out that I liked after mine! (Although the big alloys ARE very susceptible to potholes on country roads, I had 4 new tyres on the front n/s because of pothole damage over the course of four years).

    Also, they are not stupid fast, but they are definitely more ‘real world’ fast than you ever (should) need; in no way comparable to a 1.6 civic, lol. Gearing and smoothness hides a lot; the GTD is actually pretty long legged in the ratios I reckon.

    I agree with the above, we have a 65 plate GTD with DSG box and it’s all the car you need on roads today I reckon. I’d like a halfway house mode between drive and sport on the box as in normal drive it can be a bit eager to change gears to a higher ratio making it a bit lethargic, and in sport it hangs onto a gear longer than it needs to, but your driving soon adapts, I’d not buy another manual now I don’t think.

    Ours has 52k on the clock and has just been switched onto cross climate tyres. also the last service was a biggy as needed the DSG box service but also the discs and pads were toast all round.

    I find it plenty big inside, the interior looks nice (I prefer the cloth to leather) it’s got all the toys you need and it makes big mileage easy with radar, cruise and auto.

    Premier Icon Del
    Subscriber

    i have a 14 plate gti with dsg, pp, and winter pack. very capable car in my view. only FWD car i’ve had that will oversteer under power – the diff is amazing.
    the dsg box ( 6sp )is a very defining characteristic of the car, and it’s taken some time to get used to it. no reluctance to pull away and it’s not jerky at all – from memory if they are they’re not right, unless you’re doing something daft. it’s possible to activate the kickdown and get it to shift slowly, then everything comes in with a big, nasty, thump, almost a second later, which is pretty horrid. the way the boxes work together and respond to throttle and brake means if it has the wrong gear queued up it adds a very noticeable delay to the shift. usually it’s in drive and i knock it in to sport for overtakes, then straight back in to drive – as mentioned sport holds the gear all the way to the red and even in the petrol that’s a bit unnecessary. you can get to high speeds very quickly if you want to. i do sometimes use it in manual mode if i’m having fun or pulling out off a short slip road. useful to be able to knock it down a gear and get engine braking too ( which it will hold, until you dab the accelerator IIRC ) just with the paddles without switching mode.
    it will happily take the dogs and what’s really nice is you can drop in to it at the end of a long day, stick the acc on, and it’ll just trickle home.
    if i change it i’ll be looking at the octavia vrs estate or the superb, probably, but i would want the same options i have on mine, ideally.
    vw charge like wounded buffalo on servicing and i’m not all that convinced that they’re any good, either, but that’s another story. the dealer network i use got the car in from another of their garages for me to look at, 350 miles away – bmw wouldn’t do that, and the car i was interested in from them was about 50 miles away!
    there were plenty of ‘R’s about when i was looking but i didn’t want 4wd. they have a rep of not being as much fun, probably because they’re very very good. i guess if an estate one came up at the right price i’d consider it but they’re not the prettiest of things either, to my eye.
    not keen on diesels due to heavy, noisy engine, and i’m not keen on the power delivery. some better than others i guess.
    i’ve driven a few fast cars over the years but the gti is so accomplished at it all i don’t think i’ll change it for a good while unless circumstances change.

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