Using Alpkit (and other brands) jackets for skiing.

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  • Using Alpkit (and other brands) jackets for skiing.
  • john_l
    Member

    Need new ski jacket(s). Price of ski brands is bonkers, so looking at Alpkit stuff as it seems to ticket a lot of the boxes, particularly the Definition and the Ohiro.

    Leaning towards the Ohiro as I run pretty cold and am unlikely to be intentionally out in really wet conditions or deep powder.

    Any thoughts from the resident skiers?

    dashed
    Member

    I’m rather confused! Definition is £229 and the Ohiro £159. Neither of which are particularly cheap. Where have you been looking for ski jackets? Decathlon have loads of reasonably priced kit. Generally lots of reduced kit on Sportpursuit too. I’m sure others will be along shortly with other reasonably priced recommendations.

    Back to your original question. My preference is shell plus insulation layers (fleece etc) under. I very much doubt you’re need anything as insulated as the Ohiro. My wife sometime wears a thin down gilet under a shell but she has the circulation of skeletor.

    Aye. Cheap as chips from decathlon, good enough for what you need

    john_l
    Member

    Thanks for comments. I’ve been skiing for over 30 years, I just don’t choose to ski in shitty conditions, but I do know that I get really cold in the middle of Jan at 2500m 😀

    Will check out the recommendations.

    dantsw13
    Member

    Surely it’s all about the layers – any wind proof outer will do? Good gloves and a buff.

    That last time I bought a dedicated ski (well, snowboarding) jacket was admittedly quite a few years ago now, but it wasn’t that expensive – certainly a lot less than the £150+ of those jackets.

    I took my Alpkit Balance snowboarding once – just to see what it was like. It fared well – in fact it was totally fine (with an extra down layer under it) but it doesn’t have the snowboard-specific features like powder skirts and thumbie cuff things.

    So: if you need a jacket for snowboarding, buy a snowboarding jacket. If you want to go snowboarding and you already have a decent hard shell – you can just wear that and it’ll be fine. But buying an expensive hard shell with the sole purpose of snowboarding is not the right answer IMO.

    john_l
    Member

    Maybe my original post wasn’t clear – I want something that I might use in the other 50 weeks of the year as well (well, hopefully not all 50). Which is why I was looking at Alpkit.

    Sort of regretting starting this thread!

    mrmoofo
    Member

    You can ski in most things ( 8 years of living in CH, and many years of skiing / snowboarding) – as long as the weather isn’t extreme.
    Layering is key – you will be moving so you keep warm but when you stop , you get cold. If it is bright sunshine, you may not notice.
    Locals sometimes ski in T shirts in the spring ( but I wouldn’t – icy snow leave a nice rash).
    Top waterproof layer , breathable – and then layer.

    But skiing stuff is premium priced.
    Used used to buy all my stuff at the HH outlet at Bicester Village – but that has now gone.

    scuttler
    Member

    Get layers and then it’s all wearable the rest of the year (base, mid x 2 / thin down , shell). Or if you really want a dedicated ski / cold weather jacket go to TK Maxx and get one there.

    bsims
    Member

    I’ve used a non tech jacket later in the season and been fine. I have also used a Berghaus shell over fleece and base layer.

    I got a decent pair of trousers from TK max which have lasted 10 years, they are by Powderhorn 😁. I’m sure their jackets are just as good. You don’t want to ruin a good cycling jacket on ice or a tree.

    willard
    Member

    I think my trousers (Columbia) came from either TK Maxx or Go Outdoors about 10 years ago and are still my go-to for skiing or boarding. a bit big now, but comfy and warm. My jacket came from Decathlon and was cheaper than the Ohiro.

    I have an Ohiro, it’s a fine jacket. I would really want a shell for skiing though, maybe using that as insulation underneath.

    bsims
    Member

    I want something that I might use in the other 50 weeks of the year as well (well, hopefully not all 50). Which is why I was looking at Alpkit.

    A ski jacket will be no good then. A cycling shell, mid and base layer will be fine, take a fleece for if it’s really cold, as said above you can ski in anything. A tech tee for a base layer will work as well. Have your knock buff to hand to put on when you stop to help keep you warm.

    devash
    Member

    TK Maxx are usually great for ski / snowboard wear this time of year. I’ve had DC, Burton, Element, Carhartt etc snowboard jackets from them over the years, all sub-£100. Also as above, Decathlon stuff is fine.

    I personally wouldn’t ski / board in a jacket that doesn’t have some sort of elasticated gaiter to keep the snow out when you stack it so look for that.

    scuttler
    Member

    Have you knock buff to hand to put on when you stop to help keep you warm.

    Bit sexual but I supposes there’s many ways to keep warm beyond sticking another jumper on 😉

    bsims
    Member

    Damn autocorrect 😁! Neck neck neck.

    Premier Icon sandwicheater
    Subscriber

    I ski in my everyday outdoor kit.

    Descent set of waterproof trousers (they do have braces) and a descent waterproof.

    Then layer underneath as appropriate.

    I don’t look cool.

    erictwinge
    Member

    i ski in my alpkit stuff. much prefer layers than a big insulated jacket. I wear my Katabatic for warmth under a waterproof shell when its cold/wet, or just my Morphosis over a micro fleece when its nicer. the katabatic on its own gets wet…

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Subscriber

    If you want a snow-skirt, some of the European / US outdoor brands do stuff that’s aimed at ski-mountaineers and ski-tourers, so have a powder skirt (sometimes removable), but is more versatile for more general use than typical snow-sports jackets, which tend to be insulated, weather-proof shell jackets.

    Mostly outdoor brands don’t do insulated shells because they’re not very versatile – ie: they’re super warm – if you’re moving at all fast / working hard.

    I guess the two obvious practical ticks are do you need a powder shirt and do you need a helmet hood?

    Premier Icon jairaj
    Subscriber

    The only really difference between ski jacket and other activity jacket is the snow skirt that stops snow getting inside the jacket from below. If you are not going to be skiing n powder or usually ski within your ability and don’t fall often or ever. Then I think the snow skirt is a little redundant for you.

    I get super hot when I exercise or do anything active and last few times I’ve been skiing its been warm (in ski terms). I’ve opted to leave the ski jacket and use one of my waterproof biking jackets, Altura Mayhem performed great. Keep the front zipped up to stop chest from getting freezing cold air blasted at it but keep the vents open to allow some cool air in to regulate my temperature.

    Agree with the others in that a shell jacket with layer underneath is the best. Makes the jacket much more flexible and you can use it in almost any condition. On a super hot day just wear the jacket with a t-shirt underneath. As it gets colder just add a base layer or soft-shell etc until its suitable for the conditions.

    Also have a look at online stores like Absolute Snow, there are usually some bargains to be had there too.

    footflaps
    Member

    For years I just used a GTX shell over a soft shell or just a down jacket, you don’t need dedicated ski kit, although things like ski pass pocket in the sleeves etc are pretty handy for lifts etc.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    I’m of the opinion that a good set of baselayers is warmer than some fancy pants jacket.
    Add so many are saying, buy Decathlon and pair with a full set of wicking and warm thermals, a couple of light fleece middle layers and then El-Cheapo salopettes and jacket.
    Buff helps as well.

    I know we went up hill to get there, but the windchill on the Scottish hills on Friday at dawn was easily -15 to -20. I was toasty warm in a layered set up as above, with spare layers for when we stopped.

    Premier Icon Kamakazie
    Subscriber

    Having used both dedicated jackets and layers, I’d go layers.
    Softshell if dry, hardshell if wet, over some thermal bases & insulated jackets.

    Easier to manage temps between the extremes of sunny lower altitude / whiteout high altitude.

    Get layered up baby

    footflaps
    Member

    Personally I prefer a jacket over a base layer, so just two layers, that way if I want to dump heat I just unzip the jacket for half a run. That said, I take a couple of ski jackets with me skiing, one for cold days and one for milder / wet ones….

    john_l
    Member

    Thanks for all of the advice. The original question was actually around the suitability of outdoor kit from someone like Alpkit Vs dedicated ski brands. But maybe got lost in translation.

    Been skiing long enough to know what works for me. 😀

    But lots of useful stuff – thanks.

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    I actually asked alpkit about a suitable outershell that would be robust enough for snowboarding. I e taking a spill or two, can’t recall the name but they pointed me towards their mountaineering jacket iirc was around 250£. I ended up buying from West beach, less than half that for jacket and trousers.

    As others have said, the only *really* ski specific feature in a shell ski jacket is the snow skirt and YMMV with those. I’ve found a way to anchor mine to my ski-pants now but being supertall it’s still not great. Katie finds the skirt in her Mountain Equipment jacket too tight so removed it.

    Lift pass pockets usefulness depends on where you are. Most of the electronic readers are set low so always seems better to keep in a trouser pocket than sleeve pocket to me.

    Mounty_73
    Member

    I use a mixture of Rab, Montane and Alpkit walking/cycling stuff for skiing.

    Baselayer, midlayer and hardshell, plus I take a fleece gilet if its really cold. I guess you and most of us on here, you know what works for the range of conditions and temperatures.

    I think the only 2 bits of ‘skiing’ kit I use are salopettes and a helmet.

    john_l
    Member

    Just in case anyone was wondering, went with the Ohiro.

    Was perfect. Never needed a shell, even when the snow came.

    Premier Icon cynic-al
    Subscriber

    I N R A T S but I would suggest:

    “Need” new ski gear…really? Kids grown out it, holed, not waterproof, lost insulation?

    I’ve used cycling/generic outdoor stuff in the past, yeah you have to layer up, and it’s not “ski gear*, but it works fine if money genuinely is an issue.

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