Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • Unexpected Just Eat Account Set Up
  • littledave
    Free Member

    Evening all,
    I have just received a strange email from Just Eat informing me that an account has been set up using my email.
    I did not request or set up an account and the name on the email is an unusual one, not known to me.
    There is no further information other than an account has been set up, I cannot log in and order anything….

    The on line help at Just East was not helpful and could not delete the account.
    I have filled in an on line contact form and will see what happens.

    Has anyone experienced similar to this or have any words of wisdom?

    Thanks ūüôā

    martymac
    Full Member

    Someone from just eat used my wife’s card details after a genuine transaction and tried to take random amounts ranging from £2-£45 over the next fortnight.
    All stopped by the fraud team at rbs.
    Be wary.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    I get all sorts of random accounts set up and linked to my email address. My name is not that uncommon in Arica, it seems. So I get details of various Bolt trips (uber equivalent), news of visa applications, and bank account information, etc….

    Shrug.

    5plusn8
    Free Member

    your email? Do a password reset. Then you can get in and find out whats going on.

    Andy_Sweet
    Free Member

    It‚Äôs a phishing scam. I get loads of emails in my junk folder ‚Äúfrom‚ÄĚ Just Eat. Ignore.

    footflaps
    Full Member

    Someone opened a genuine Sainsbury account using the wife‚Äôs email ‚Äď used to get regular order updates for their weekly shop. As we didn‚Äôt have the password we couldn‚Äôt log in but eventually we requested a password reset which came to us, so we could log in and then change the password, which locked the owner out for good. Emails stopped after that.

    airvent
    Free Member

    Surely no account has actually been made as you would need to click the link in the email you receive to complete the set up, so unless they have access to your email how would they have done this?

    thegreatape
    Free Member

    I get regular emails from kindergartens in Wisconsin, mostly thanking me for my interest in moving my child there, but also sometimes from what must be the current one telling me all about the incident that must be the reason this child is being moved. At least the parent(s) that cannot spell their email address correctly are not considering home schooling. And good luck Jamie, it’s been interesting following your progress.

    sobriety
    Free Member

    I get ones from an autobody repair shop, given they talk about insurance costs, fees and saving money, I’m not convinced they aren’t an elaborate scam. I just delete them.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    In my case I’m sure that accounts have genuinely been set up which use my email address. I wonder if it’s due to the way email addresses are resolved, with eg.

    first.last@gmail
    firstlast@gmail
    firstlast+123@gmail

    all being forwarded to the same box. Or maybe someone just typed it in wrong. Regardless, my email account is secure and they have not hacked it. It’s just other people sharing my name, coupled to crappy systems that don’t verify adequately.

    When I recently started getting notification of every trivial credit and debit in some Ghanaian randomer’s bank account, I did eventually get the bank in question to stop sending them, by tweeting about it (email had been ignored).

    Greybeard
    Full Member

    I have a address of the form firstlast@gmail. I’ve had emails to that address with attachments that enabled me to see that they should have gone to firstlast33@gmail and firstlast11@gmail. There was no malicious intent, just carelessness. Not all suppliers require new customers to click a link to verify their email address.

    On the other hand, there are phishing and scam emails. It‚Äôs trivially easy to send email with any ‚Äėfrom‚Äô address you choose, so never believe the ‚Äėfrom‚Äô address unless the content validates it. If you learn to read email headers, you can usually work out whether the email has actually been sent by the organisation indicated by the ‚Äėfrom‚Äô address.

    thepodge
    Free Member

    My mate has firstlast@ and regularly gets emails to a similar named person, lots of job offers in the theatre and a yearly update from some random relative in the USA every Christmas but the best was flight e-tickets to a stag do in Amsterdam, we tried convincing him to at least turn up to the airport if not try and blag his way on but he wasn’t having any of it.

    spooky_b329
    Full Member

    @littledave

    Did you click a link in the email to try and log in (unsafe) or did you manually type in JustEat on your browser (safe)?

    If you clicked a link the address may not be genuine and taken you to a cloned site, any password you typed could be tried on other common platforms (which is why you should have a different password for each site)

    Suspect this is how must Facebook accounts get compromised, you get an innocent email prompting you to check an activity on Facebook and after clicking it asks you to log in, stealing your password.

    boombang
    Free Member

    There is a nice chap from Kent who has his email regularly mistyped (one letter missed) and I gave had job interview details, university communications and even a tenancy agreement sent to me.

    My father used to gets regular comms from a credit card provider about a card limit being breached (.com versus .co.uk).

    The oddest one was me being mistaken for a US Real Estate agent and the party who mailed me not accepting I was an unconnected chap in the UK.

    Basically it happens, plenty.

    desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    Basically it happens, plenty.

    Yeah, what happens is the spam/phishing bots are programmed to send messages to every variation of email addresses in the hope that they hit someone vulnerable enough to follow a link and/or send security details to somewhere they shouldn’t.

    lunge
    Full Member

    I saw a Tweet yesterday about how normalised scamming is.
    Like, every day we get e-mails in our inbox that with a couple of wrong clicks can lead you to financial ruin and we just accept it as part of life.
    Strange.

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)

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