tubeless tyres = gash?

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  • tubeless tyres = gash?
  • I’m being pedantic/stupid, but damaging the tyre is one thing, I’d see a pinch as something different. And as you say, if you hit hard enough to damage the tyre, you were puncturing a tube anyhow.

    I just really cannot be arsed to try tubeless, despite people extolling the virtues.

    Maybe one day.

    GEDA
    Member

    Apart from the people who have no issues with tubeless has anybody who has had this issue (Pinch flatting running tubeless) managed to solve it?

    I have always had problem with pinch punctures with tubes and so thought tubeless was going to solve all my issues. No. Tired 819 and proper UST tyres and still get pinch punctures. I think some of the reason was positioning on the bike and being too far back. I have fixed that. The other may be loosing pressure but I have had pinches straight after pumping the tyre up on stony downhills.

    So what tubeless tyres have the strongest sidewalls. I don’t really want to run DH tyres.

    I have recently got stans flow ex rims and do not seem to have managed to pinch tyres using them.

    Premier Icon parkesie
    Subscriber

    If your pinch flatting tubeless your doing something wrong.
    Wrong tyres, too low a pressure or your just a bufoon.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    GEDA – Member

    Apart from the people who have no issues with tubeless has anybody who has had this issue (Pinch flatting running tubeless) managed to solve it?

    Honestly it is just 3 things- adequate pressure, adequate technique and adequate tyres, in that order. But getting the pressures right is the big thing. Tough tyres to stop tubeless pinches is treating the symptoms not the cause. Wider rims can help too but it’s the same thing.

    Apart from the people who have no issues with tubeless has anybody who has had this issue (Pinch flatting running tubeless) managed to solve it?

    I’d say it’s ‘just’ a case of making sure the tyres, rims and pressures suit the environments. I’ve learnt that for me low 20s psi on the back on a hardtail might work great in the mud and greasy tree roots of my locale but it won’t cope when I ride rockier faster trails elsewhere. However I’ve also noticed that those fast rocky trails have more grip so generate more g when cornering and require a firmer tyre to prevent squirm.

    I think wide rims are far more beneficial with tubeless because of how much better they hold and support the tyre when you’re cornering hard (good pinkbike article on this) – when there’s a tube in there that tube is helping hold the tyre on and stiffening the sidewalls thus reducing squirm (but also stiffening and damping the carcass under the tread thus increasing rolling resistance).

    I’m really impressed with the new Super Gravity tyres from Schwalbe – I’m only running one up front but it rolls remarkably well considering it’s a 1kg fairly sticky tyre with full dual-ply sidewalls. If you can pinch flat one of those tubeless I’d be amazed!

    Braking when you hit rocky sections at speed can be very tough on tyres – get your speed right and then let the tyres roll!

    duir
    Member

    Tried a 2.2 UST Rubber Queen tubeless in the Lakes last year on the rear. Lasted half a day before the sidewall tore (30psi). Went back to Maxxis EXO or 2 ply rear.

    Thought I would try them after all the rave reviews but I found the rubber queen to be expensive, has rubbish traction in the wet/mud and loose dry and is made of paper.

    Not a good tyre for the Lakes I would say,unless you only ride at Whinlatter or are 8 stone.

    mindmap3
    Member

    I’m one of the lucky ones who hasn’t really had issues with tubeless tyres, but I never used to puncture tubes that much either.

    I run my Hans Dampf’s around the 20psi mark where ever I ride. I do run widish rims which may help. I’ve bashed my rear rim a few times and not lost any pressure etc (they’ve now been bent back to shape). I managed to burp the rear tyre once cornering hard in the summer with sub 20psi.

    I’m far from a riding god, but I’m not the slowest either.

    Premier Icon tomaso
    Subscriber

    Have tubes and don’t pinch all because of dual ply.

    Mates run tubeless dual ply Minions and don’t pinch.

    Either way its a simple solution.

    Fixed that for you, unless apres ski has turned you in to some tartiflette pot bellied beer monster?

    cky-Thump –
    I’m a clumsy fat skinny get
    and that’s why I love tubeless.
    Dual ply maxxis on Stans Flows on both full sus bikes. Bombproof

    ali69er
    Member

    I have had a problem with the tyre burping on the front. Tyre almost completely came off the rim. The pressure had dropped loads. Now check them every ride.

    That was tubeless tyres on tubeless rims. I do worry every ride about them

    I had a thorn puncture last weekend while pushing my bike downhill on a cattle-churned manure-fest which was singletrack four months ago.

    That was enough to convince me to set my winter tyres up tubeless.

    I’d say it’s ‘just’ a case of making sure the tyres, rims and pressures suit the environments.

    In a nutshell.

    I think wide rims are far more beneficial with tubeless because of how much better they hold and support the tyre when you’re cornering hard

    Agreed.

    When there’s a tube in there that tube is helping hold the tyre on and stiffening the sidewalls thus reducing squirm

    Totally. A UST tyre is designed to be run without a tube and has a stiffer, tougher sidewall for that reason. A regular tyre isn’t.

    To sum it up – don’t put set-up Conti Supersonics tubeless on to your your 160mm bike in the Lakes and expect them to work like proper UST tyres.

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