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  • TT on the cheap
  • Premier Icon deviant
    Free Member

    Have thoroughly enjoyed a 10 mile TT I did in the summer on my road bike, so much so I’m building up a bike to do most of next summer’s club events.
    Budget conscious, so I’ve got an alu frame with the recessed seat tube to tuck the rear wheel away, gone for an integrated areo bars and stem combo and an areo seat post, other than that it will be practice practice and focus on my position.
    Ordered a new groupset of 11 speed goodness to help me on my way, any further tips?

    Premier Icon andysredmini
    Free Member

    Power meter for your existing bike. You will get more gains training your body than buying stuff for a new bike. I knocked minutes off my 10mile tt times and came 3rd over all in the local series.

    Premier Icon schmiken
    Full Member

    Get an aero helmet, well fitted skinsuit and more flexible.

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Free Member

    integrated areo bars and stem combo

    Was going to say get a front end with lots of adjustability, mostly for going longer, lower, narrower (as those as the most likely gains.)

    Skinsuit, aero helmet (don’t bother spending much as it’ll likely be the wrong one), shiny shoe covers, shave your legs or get some trip socks.

    What wheels you got? Wheel cover for the rear.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    mostly for going longer, lower, narrower (as those as the most likely gains.)

    Almost exactly the opposite of what the pros with all their wind tunnel power testing are doing. But don’t let that stop you.

    It’s not 1990 anymore. Licking your front wheel is no longer cool

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    Saddle moved forward and nosed down.

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    skinsuit. Fastest gain for your money by some margin.

    Integrated bars and stem may not necessarily get you into the most aero position. Do the bars have extensions? Is the frame a road frame, and if so, would it benefit from a negative 17 or even 40 degree stem to get elbow rests lower?

    After training, position then skinsuit and helmet. Shoe covers and aerosox after that.

    BTW cranking right over for a nice flat back may be more aero for some, but power goes down as you hip angle closes. My hips are at about 87-90 degrees.

    You can buy speed, but you can’t buy time spent in an aero position.

    This started as a budget £400 TT bike. There have been a few upgrades 😉

    Premier Icon mtbtomo
    Free Member

    I don’t spend much time TTing compared to road racing, but if you go lower, you might find your hip angle gets too closed and you lose power.

    Aero extensions/time trial bike position make the biggest time difference. Wheels haven’t made masses of difference for me.

    And without a power meter, I get the impression whilst it might still be fun and you can get faster, it’s a bit like fumbling round in the dark as to why you went faster/slower (was it more power, was it the conditions etc etc)

    Premier Icon jobro
    Free Member

    It’s all about the best tt position, apart from the training that is.
    Best tt position see ms to change according to latest data. We used to ride without clip on bars at eye level. That was that Boardman chappie!

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Free Member

    Almost exactly the opposite of what the pros with all their wind tunnel power testing are doing. But don’t let that stop you.

    🙂

    That’s why I said “most likely”. Still most testers I know who’ve been for aero testing (including myself) come back longer, lower and narrower. Works for some, doesn’t work for others.

    But yes, don’t bother making any changes unless you have some way of determining if those are the right changes for you (track, tunnel, aerolab.) With obvious consideration for trade offs between power and aero.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Free Member

    The pros are still pretty low though aren’t they? I thought the principle was just not too low?

    Premier Icon mrblobby
    Free Member

    I thought the principle was just not too low?

    Principle is whatever works best for you and gives you the fastest combination of power and aero within whatever regulatory constraints you have to comply with (and obviously is sustainable for the duration of your event.)

    Premier Icon karnali
    Free Member

    Position to present smallest area to the wind you can manage and hold without moving whilst still putting the power out. A 2nd hand power tap wheel or other power meter will help you a lot with training well and the latter part of power difference in different positions.

    Premier Icon mattsccm
    Free Member

    I thought you said budget. A new 11 speed setup doesn’t sound that way . Anyway, You can of course go to town but as a beginner just cover a few basics like position. Get fit. All the aero kit in the world doesn’t make me as fast as those younger than me.

    Premier Icon deviant
    Free Member

    My current bikes drivetraiin is past its best, a new 105 11speed groupset is £300, the generic frame is Alu and is £100, the wheels are £220, the bars/stem is £60, the seatpost is £30, the saddle is £30, bar’s tape Is £20…all it it’s standing me less than bm

    Premier Icon TiRed
    Full Member

    Used tt bikes are always good value. They get pampered and hardly used. I did upgrade mine to Etap though 😆

    Premier Icon deviant
    Free Member

    Finally added it up, just need the bars to arrive and I’m good to go.

    It has been budget of sorts…the groupset was the most expensive part, a new 105 groupset for around £300
    The Chinese catslogue frame was £80
    The superstar wheels were £200
    The bar/stem combo is £40
    Seatpost £20
    Bartape £16
    Saddle £30

    I make that less than £700….not bad I reckon.

    So the general consensus Is to get a skinsuit?

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Full Member

    I’m selling a Spuik Aizea helmet for £40 posted. Only used once and i snapped the tabs of the removable tail. You can use it tailess (its designed that way) or if you find out you want the tail you could glue it on.

    Premier Icon trail_rat
    Free Member

    I make that less than £700….not bad I reckon.

    Bought a hardly used 10speed ultegra planet x complete stealth for not a whole lot more – albe it with pish wheels and bar/stem combo.

    Over time i picked up a set of 100mm carbon wheels and tubs for 200 quid
    Carbon base bars and extensions for 60 quid.

    Used time trial stuff seems to be very good value if you aint looking for the latest gear thanks to everyone looking to buy speed with what ever the comics say are the fastest things.

    Premier Icon crashtestmonkey
    Free Member

    this

    Used tt bikes are always good value. They get pampered and hardly used

    and

    albeit with pish wheels

    because usually when people are upgrading the frame or bike they’ve previously upgraded the wheels and are keeping ’em. I picked up a tidy Cannondale Slice for £500, came with cheap wheels but I’ve already got nice deep section carbons on the road bike. Might get a used disc rear over the winter with a view to sharing it with t’other half (we’ve both started doing the club weekly TTs in the summer, and she’s entered another IM next year). Her Cube was also 500 quid, alloy frame but immaculate, nicer Easton wheels and carbon cockpit, and a dura ace rear mech (which may find it’s way onto another bike 😉 )

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