Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 123 total)
  • Trees on trails
  • onehundredthidiot
    Full Member

    @Northwind with that moniker you should be able to figure out why this was different. 😆.

    It was indeed a north wind which is not the normal strong wind direction.

    Northwind
    Full Member

    Ohhhhh. Yes that makes sense. I’m oblivious to that sort of thing.

    In that case, I apologise for all the trouble I have caused.

    LD
    Free Member

    @Northwind with that moniker you should be able to figure out why this was different. 😆.

    It was indeed a north wind which is not the normal strong wind direction.

    Well put.

    Jordan
    Full Member

    Anyone know what Gisburns like? Was thinking of heading down on thursday.

    And wow! A week for basic chainsaw. It was a day 30 odd years ago when I did mine then another day for basic felling.

    dan30237
    Free Member

    @Gaz.dick that’s absolutely gutting to hear, Thrunton is brilliant. Do you know of any efforts planned for volunteers to clear the trails? I’ll happily go along with a spade to help.

    boxelder
    Full Member

    Cutting/clearing windblown trees stacked on top of each other can be really hazardous. Hope no-one gets hurt being a ‘have-a-go hero’

    thenorthwind
    Full Member

    @dan30237 @Gaz.dick also gutted to hear about Thrunton, one of my favourite places. I’m sure the trail building group will be looking at what they can do, but as @boxelder says, likely to be largely clearing fallen trees with chainsaws, so presumably not much volunteers can do.

    thenorthwind
    Full Member

    I expect me and @Northwind are not going to be welcome round here for a while, in the same way that people stopped buying Corona beer at the start of the pandemic.

    remedyflyer
    Free Member

    Fair few in Forest Of dean Sunday but big area so you can just go around them Dowies area was fine would not of gone down there Saturday.

    onehundredthidiot
    Full Member

    Yep, folk not realising that th root and associated earth is being countered by the tree. Cut it in the wrong place and root ball falls back into its hole bringing the trunk with it and clocking the unsuspecting in the face on the way through.

    CheesybeanZ
    Full Member

    Fair few in Forest Of dean Sunday but big area so you can just go around them Dowies area was fine would not of gone down there Saturday.

    Dowies 5 had one across it on Sunday.

    frogstomp
    Full Member

    TVTA just posted this photo of Walk Or Burn, or rather what was:

    pothead
    Free Member

    Thrunton is brilliant. Do you know of any efforts planned for volunteers to clear the trails? I’ll happily go along with a spade to help.

    Fairly sure the trailbuilders meet on the 1st Sunday every month but from what I’ve seen of the damage (pics, not actually been up myself) I’d be surprised if FC allow anyone in for a good while yet, I’m told the steep stuff ( Pink Panther/Big Issue/Concussion etc) is completely wrecked, possibly beyond saving, same for trails back down to the car park (HP sauce, Monkey Trousers/Skullys Gully etc). Fingers crossed at least some of it survives and I’ll definitely muck in when they get the ok

    LD
    Free Member

    Following from DMBinS on FB.

    STORM ARWEN – EMERGENCY WEBINAR – TONIGHT 1930 (30th November 2021)
    It has been a hard weekend for several trail groups across Scotland with many trails having been damaged or lost to Storm Arwen. Whilst we understand the desire to open trails, particularly those who may have only a handful of trees down, can we reiterate that it is essential that any work has to be agreed in advance before being carried out.
    We have been engaging with Forestry and Land Scotland and would like to convene an online meeting between FLS, Trails Associations, Local Groups, and trail builders at 7.30 tonight, Tuesday 30th November 2021.
    The meeting will focus on the immediate priorities of inspecting the damage in a safe way and getting a shared understanding of the current challenge.
    Building trust and understanding will be important for effective working together through this process. We are sure you understand and will help share the webinar link and the news of this proactive approach.
    Please feel free to share this link with anyone involved in inspecting or clearing trails.
    Webinar on Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81374351759
    We are keen to help advise riders of locations across Scotland that are open and safe to ride and will be collating and disseminating information as soon as we get it.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    @Jordan, Gisburn cafe has a facebook page https://www.facebook.com/gisburnforestcafe which suggests they’ve had some problems but probably mostly rideable now I’d guess. You could try phoning tomorrow to check. There were some trees down round here but not really very many, it wasn’t all that windy IMO. Not the carnage seen in some places anyway.

    Jordan
    Full Member

    @thecaptain just seen on fb forestry have closed the trails.

    singlespeedstu
    Full Member

    Things are looking better for the Golfie than I feared.

    TVTA just posted this.

    Big day of hiking yesterday for a number of our most experienced co ordinators and builders as we carefully walked the trails of Caberston and Cairn hill to record damage locations to pass back to Forestry and Land Scotland for repairs once they can happen.
    Amazingly most of the trails have come through with only minor areas affected and with a bit of time and work we should get the entire front side of the hill back eventually. There are some huge areas of mayhem off the back which may well be gone forever though, and with access roads still horribly blocked the chance to get in real trouble up there remains very real for now.
    Please stay off the hill for the moment, know that things are moving to get us back to a better place and that it could have been much much worse! We already have work plans for restoration once we can take digs in so keep a look out for updates over the coming days and weeks. #forestry

    vazaha
    Full Member

    The effects of Storm Arwen has been quite extensive at Cannock Chase Forest. There is widespread damage across all trails. So unfortunately we have extensive closures at the moment.
    We have a team out working to clear the damage but anticipate that this will be several days work. They’re working hard to get things back to normal as quickly as possible.

    Open

    • Carparks
    • Café
    • Bike Shop
    • Christmas Trees
    • Lady hill Area
    • Concert Field
    • Gruffalo Spotters
    • Pedal and Play (Leaf section Closed)
    • Play Area

    Closed

    • GoApe
    • All Trails
    • Fairoak
    • Perry’s Trail
    • Follow the Dog
    • Monkey Trail
    • Stile Cop
    • Running Trails
    • Fishing Pools
    • Orienteering
    • Tackeroo Camping
    Thanks for bearing with us.

    Waderider
    Free Member

    The presumption for dealing with multiple wind blow in publicly owned forests will and should be mechanised i.e. by harvesters. So the clear up may take some time.

    mashr
    Full Member

    Yeah would expect some serious kit getting deployed in many locations – and these are just the forests we’re paying attention to as they have trails. Every tree on the ground is potentially lost revenue, so they’ll have to get a shift on

    bruneep
    Full Member

    On the FLS webinar tonight, the FLS man said most of the wind blow has no commercial value and will in fact cot them money to retrieve.

    mashr
    Full Member

    Urgh, hopefully there’s still incentive to move it quickly then

    bruneep
    Full Member

    someone on a FB page posted up a summary of FLS meeting

     It Was pretty tough to listen to. Basically stay out of the forests.. FLS are a few weeks from knowing full extent of the damage. Most of the timber isn’t of any value and all the clean up where there’s been wind fall has to be done by machines no man and chainsaw. Money simply won’t be there to sort all of it. Need to wait a wee while to give FLS a chance fully assess the scope of the damage. The immediate focus is on property damage, power line damage and trapped people. FLS want to utilise the MTB community’s support but need to assess where that can be best put to use and obviously only when safe to do so. That will all take time. They will regularly communicate through Trail associations etc and let us know as soon as possible where it is ok to ride..

    the FLS promised an update very soon

    teethgrinder
    Full Member

    Had a mooch about Chopwell this afternoon. There are a lot of trees down on fire roads. Some are able to be bypassed, some are like the end of a game of Jenga.

    Trail-wise, the east seems to be more affected, with the odd trails that are blocked that can be cleared with folding saws on the West.

    Seemed like 50% uprooted pine, 25% pine/spruce etc where the trunk snapped and 25% other where boughs snapped.

    It’s bad, but luckily not as bad as it could’ve been. I’m sure new trails and new ways in to existing trails will appear, just like they do after logging.

    Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    From the FLS ditty above –

    Most of the timber isn’t of any value

    How bloody galling is that.

    bighairydel
    Full Member

    Not the best week for the missus to surprise me with a MTBing weekend she’s booked for my birthday at Glentress/Inners in 10 days. Don’t have the heart to tell her how bad it sounds.

    Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Not the best week for the missus to surprise me with a MTBing weekend she’s booked for my birthday at Glentress/Inners in 10 days. Don’t have the heart to tell her how bad it sounds


    @bighairydel
    Adrenalin uplift are saying that FLS have assessed and it doesn’t look anywhere near as bad as feared on Plora side, hearing similar things about Golfie side too, so might be okay. There’s still Gypsy glen, 3 brethren etc and a whole load of other really good natural riding.

    thenorthwind
    Full Member

    @bruneep

    On the FLS webinar tonight, the FLS man said most of the wind blow has no commercial value and will in fact cot them money to retrieve.

    Bit of a moot point, but is that “it has no commercial value now it’s blown over” or “it didn’t have any commericial value before”?

    Northwind
    Full Member

    Even the assessments and updates are going to be slow- harvester’s clearing the roads, rangers are inspecting trails but that’s a lot of trails and some aren’t safely accessible. Then planning for chainsaw ops. The next trailfairies session’s been cancelled just for safety and for not really being able to plan, so we’re not going to get into actually fixing stuff (like root-plate damage) or light windfall clearance for a bit longer.

    (as ever, this is me as a volunteer, I don’t speak for the FC at all and I can be wrong)

    Seems pretty obvious though that the focus will be on the busiest trails, and also the most accessible trails and easiest to reopen trails. And I think you can take it for granted that there’ll be some long-term closures and some permanent closures though don’t make too many assumptions about which or where because it’s often not simple.

    Lockdown giveth and Arwen taketh away :(

    thenorthwind
    Full Member

    Bit of a moot point, but is that “it has no commercial value now it’s blown over” or “it didn’t have any commericial value before”?

    Yeah for sure some of it will have had pretty marginal value anyway but at the same time a lot of it will be just not ready/not the right time to harvest.

    didnthurt
    Full Member

    Saw one – quite large – tree across the trails up Beecraigs (West Lothian) last weekend, went out for a spin today and it’s already been cut out of the way. Excellent work to the park rangers.

    bruneep
    Full Member

    @thenorthwind

    Bit of a moot point, but is that “it has no commercial value now it’s blown over” or “it didn’t have any commericial value before”?

    Both now I’d imagine.  he just said  “the wind blow has no commercial value and will in fact cost them money to retrieve.”  Only he knows exactly what he meant, but from the rest of conversation it sounded they won’t be in a hurry to retrieve/harvest. On the tress that have blown he did say the if the root ball is still attached to the ground the trees will continue to live. so the wood  wouldn’t start to decline as quick as if it snapped at the base etc. Guessing the target markets for that timber require “fresh” wood as apposed to aged cut wood.

    andrewh
    Free Member

    Bit of a moot point, but is that “it has no commercial value now it’s blown over” or “it didn’t have any commericial value before”?

    My guess wood be (see what I did there🤣🤣🤣) that neat rows of standing trees are easy/cheap to harvest and lots of trees just strewn about the place are difficult/expensive. The wood may well be worth the same but if the costs of actually getting it out becomes higher than its value there’s little incentive to do so.
    And a fair few will probably be snapped and broken and probably worth less anyway, double whammy

    Trekster
    Full Member

    https://dmbins.com/
    If you are in Scotland it might be worth following dmbins for updates from FLS and others, probably via Facebook, Twitter etc

    https://forestryandland.gov.scot/visit/activities/mountain-biking/7stanes

    Again, Facebook and Twitter etc seem to be the way organisations wish to use to communicate

    Spoke to an Ae village resident earlier and FLS have not made a start on road/trail clearances which isn`t a surprise.

    A friend is a retired SSE employee and he has a son who has worked all the hours since Saturday. Dumfries and Galloway apparently has the largest percentage of overland power lines in Scotland and he has`t seen such devastation in all he working days!

    steamtb
    Full Member

    Had a look over all our local trails today (Shropshire, near Shrewsbury) and pretty much every single one of them is going to be unrideable for a long time. One area that has numerous brilliant little trails is absolutely destroyed and I can’t see any of them ever being ridden again. The area is generally looked after by local authority wardens, but in reality, it’s usually people who live around here that clear trees from paths and trails. The current devastation is way beyond anyone except a large forestry operation, which doesn’t exist here. It’s certainly put a crimp on having mountain biking as a hobby and I’m more than a bit sad for my daughter, as we grab our bikes and head out for fun, local rides every week without fail, or did. It’s odd, as the village itself hasn’t really suffered much damage so it was shocking to see the state of the country parks.

    I just hope all the trail centres and businesses who really need trails to survive manage to get through this, harsh times after the two years they have had.

    Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    Where I’m planning to dig this year, not a tree in sight!

    carrick

    molgrips
    Free Member

    @steamtb you could perhaps organise a whip-round for someone to come in and clear it? Don’t give up.

    steamtb
    Full Member

    Good idea @molgrips, but I’m guessing it’s 10’s of 1000’s if not lots more and the geography would make it impossible for large machinery without doing a huge amount more damage. I have messaged the wardens to see if they want volunteers as a starter for 10!

    molgrips
    Free Member

    Well presumably you don’t need the whole lot removed just parts of some?

    We had a huge downed tree on one trail and someone just cut the middle out and left the rest. Not quite sure how, mind.

    yetidave
    Free Member

    no-one gets hurt being a ‘have-a-go hero’

    there was a bloke on the BBC news a day or two ago cutting a tree sat in a road which was >4ft, no chainsaw specific ppe at all, and the way he was wielding the saw made me wince. Just hacking away, plunging the saw out of sight on the opposite side of the tree, no stable platform to be stood on etc.

    molgrips
    Free Member

    Yeah don’t have a go yourself without extreme caution and even then only on really small stuff. Downed trees can be weighted and under great tension so many tons of timber can end up flying about explosively when the tension is released.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 123 total)

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