Transporting muddy bike in a decent car – help with an idea?

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  • Transporting muddy bike in a decent car – help with an idea?
  • dannyh
    Member

    I’ve recently been given a company car and need to treat it a whole lot better than my trusty old banger. I had dragged the forks down the roof lining, and snagged it a couple of times with chainrings etc.

    I am thinking that a big drawstring bag in a light to medium canvas would be perfect. Just pop the wheels off, compress the reverb and put it in the bag before chucking it in the boot. The trouble is I can’t find a suitable bag.

    Do I need to dust off my appalling sewing skills, or can someone point me in the direction of somewhere I can buy something?

    A jute sack would be a second choice, but I prefer the idea of something a bit lighter than can just be pulled over the bike and done up.

    stox
    Member

    The bag would get very dirty very quickly wouldn’t it?!

    Just get a boot liner and take a bit of care putting it in the car …

    dannyh
    Member

    The bag would get very dirty very quickly wouldn’t it?!

    The inside would, yes, but if I always put it on the same way around, the bits that would touch the roof lining accidentally would be pretty clean, I think.

    Also, when putting the bike in the car after a night ride in the dark doesn’t always lend itself to accuracy…….

    JonEdwards
    Member

    Hatchbags

    Do what they say on the tin.

    Murray
    Member

    I use a Duffbag and a Booths carrier bag for my kit. Works fine for me.

    Premier Icon jerseychaz
    Subscriber

    Buy a big pair of lined curtains from your local charity shop – the linings aren’t stitched along the bottom edge = large bag! Used it for road bikes loads of times.

    Premier Icon lukedwr
    Subscriber
    Premier Icon theotherjonv
    Subscriber

    Find a mattress shop and see if they have and heavy duty bags that they come in?

    Or buy an eyeletted tarp, zip tie some of the eyelets, hey presto!

    iolo
    Member

    lukedwr – Member
    Duffbags
    POSTED 8 MINUTES AGO # REPORT-POST

    Buy now, receive in 6 month bags?

    Get a boot liner. Maybe even a bike wash plug in thing – dirt worker type thing.

    A large plastic sheet from B & Q does the job for me. Just line the boot out with it and fold the rest back over the top of the bike. I’ve done that for years with hire cars with no problems.

    Premier Icon lukedwr
    Subscriber

    Buy now, receive in 6 month bags?

    Oh that came pretty quickly. It’s the kitbag that’s taking it’s time!

    stealthcat
    Member

    Cheap/old duvet cover?

    sparkuk
    Member

    An old quilt cover maybe big enough?

    dazz
    Member

    I’ve always just used an old sheet/duvet cover in my company cars, never had an issue when returning them.

    warpcow
    Member

    Eyeletted tarp, as someone already said. Mine cost me less than £10 iirc.

    neilm
    Member

    I use a proper bike bag.

    They are £50 new but I got my last one from eBay for £15.

    dannyh
    Member

    I like the old duvet cover idea, I think that’s what i will try first.

    Thanks to those who replied.

    Premier Icon deadkenny
    Subscriber

    +1 Hatchbag. Proper hard wearing boot liner fitted for your car. Every now and again I take it out and empty half a forest, but otherwise the car is fine (scratched up a bit though from before I used a liner, but fine since).

    I used sheets and stuff before, but they shift around and the mud gets everywhere. Doesn’t protect the sides from scratching unless you can set up covers for the sides that stay in place. A proper fitted liner is much nicer though.

    mjsmke
    Member

    Before we got a toe bar rack we just used a heavy duty Tarp from B&Q to line the boot and seats and took the wheels off. 2 bikes in a Fiat 500 and never marked the roof or doors. Just take care when moving them in/out. A few bits a thick cardboard can help.

    TimothyD
    Member

    Roof rack?

    Might depend on your area I guess…

    Hopk1ns
    Member

    As mentioned above

    Duff bag will cover entire bike without fuss – video on this link

    Duffbag Monster Bag

    Premier Icon fathomer
    Subscriber

    Your not supposed to respect company cars are you? I know I dont!

    But, an old duvet on the floor of the boot and over the seat backs, front wheel always off and I’ve never had a problem.

    If I ever get out on a Wednesday night again, I’ll show you 😀

    matther01
    Member

    I just use a massive old picnic blanket…cost me about £6 from dunelm I think.

    Premier Icon alibongo001
    Subscriber

    I have used a double duvet cover lots!

    They are really good, choose a thicker material if you can so you don’t get soak through!

    Also put it in backwards so it lays on the left hand side, that way the chainset is off the floor to reduce oily stains and the forks dont have have far to go in the car to snag on stuff.

    Easier with 2 people, one to guide the back, one to push!

    dannyh
    Member

    If I ever get out on a Wednesday night again, I’ll show you

    Ha ha, I’m in a fairly similar boat. The aforementioned company car is attached to a promotion. The downside is that I’m probably going to be missing out on Wednesday nights a lot more. If I can get the person I’ve recruited to replace me up to speed quick, I might be making most Wednesdays by June/July time. Until then it’ll probably be a max of once or twice a month if I’m lucky……

    I’m going with taking the wheels off, sliding the bike into an old king sized duvet cover, lifting it into the boot then putting the wheels in the cover as well. Should do the biz I think. Those boot liners look good, but it’s the muddying and scuffing of the ceiling and sides that bothers me the most.

    Hoovering the boot from time to time is not an issue, trying to scrub mud off of the ‘dirt-attracta’ fabric that seems to be used for most car roof linings is what I want to avoid.

    dirtydog
    Member

    Dust sheet and a pair of wheelbags.

    I picked up one of these years ago, very useful (but a bit pricey now).

    Body Bag

    Only needs the front wheel removing.

    b r
    Member

    I’ve never looked after a car, mine or company but have pretty much always put the bike on a rack – towbar Thule or Saris Bones (for the one car I had without a towbar).

    And always got my company cars with towbars.

    Premier Icon dti
    Subscriber

    woolsack?
    Travis perkins also sell a double ton bag for about a tenner.

    Vinnyc
    Member

    I use a old tent groundsheet, waterproof to

    Premier Icon garage-dweller
    Subscriber

    Tarpaulin is what I use. For better protection than I bother with you could Use the eyelets and some ties or pongos (bungees) to door handles, head rests etc to hold in place. I am assuming estate or hatch with seats down and bike on side Wheels in our out as dictated by car ssize.

    I have had my car 7 years 90% of my bike carrying is inside and its not ruined yet.

    I did similar with my company car before that although the lighter interior picked up a few marks that needed the odds dose of autoglym shampoo!

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    I used to use an old shower curtain

    DickBarton
    Member

    Buy a tarp from local diy store – something like a 5mx4m, open up boot and fold seats down…put tarp in middle and then spread it out – mark where folders are and then gaffa tape them (it keeps the shape needed for your car and also allows you to make it cover the sides and windows). I’ve also got a couple of bungees to keep the tarp up against the headrests (as mentioned further up the list) – means the sides of the car remain covered and any moisture (mud/water) is caught and remains in the tarp and not in the car).

    Put bike in and off you go – tarp is waterproof and easy enough to whip out and clean/dry – keeps the inside of car spotless (apart from roof as that isn’t covered but I’m assuming you’d be careful enough when inserting/removing).

    Total cost – about £15 (5x4m tarp, bungees and gaffa), total effort time – about 10 minutes.

    Premier Icon tom200
    Subscriber

    Swap the company car for a car allowance, spank the money on a sick new bike, and spend the change on a rubbish car you don’t mind soiling.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Enormous heavy duty tarp (not a cheap crinkly one, a proper old school one- you need the weight to stop it moving around) , line the sides of the car as well as you can. Once you’ve done that, the roof’s easy because you don’t need to think about anything else.

    Also, consider making the bike smaller than it needs to be just to fit- I can fit whole bikes in the back of mine but if I want to be really sure exactly where they’re going, I take a wheel off, much more managable.

    Premier Icon iainc
    Subscriber

    Thule roof carriers. Lift intact manky bike on roof, drive home, lift off, hose down, lube and put it away 🙂

    ajantom
    Member

    ….or a portable washer – Mobi or similar?
    I have no rear access (oh matron!) and this has solved my woes.
    Quick blast with the washer after a ride, wipe down and light oil, and into the car on an old bed sheet. Takes all of 10-15 minutes, and means clean car and clean house when I get home.

    globalti
    Member

    Cleaning the bike straight after the ride is miserable because you’ll be damp and you’ll get chilled then the bike will drip mucky water. When I mountain biked I used to line the Passat estate with an old fitted sheet – it slips over the tops of the folded seat backs then over the corners of the spare wheel cover/floor panel and stretches perfectly. Chuck in the bike and any mud that gets on the upholstery would dry and could be vacuumed off next time I cleaned the car.

    Coming back from night rides filthy dirty and soaked then having to clean the bike, my kit and change in a freezing garage was a major element in my growing disenchantment with mountain biking. At least on the road you get back clean and dry (usually) straight to the door and only have to wash the bike down after wet conditions.

    dannyh
    Member

    Coming back from night rides filthy dirty and soaked then having to clean the bike, my kit and change in a freezing garage was a major element in my growing disenchantment with mountain biking.

    That’s like saying ‘MacBeth’ to an actor…………..

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 58 total)

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