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  • Trail Shoes….Educate me
  • Premier Icon ovoderbars
    Free Member

    I’m after my first pair of off road running shoes. Planning to run various routes in Kent from the North Downs way, local muddy woods and coastal/cliff paths in Dover/Folkestone way.

    Will one pair of shoes cover this or will I need multiple shoes with varying tread patterns?

    Premier Icon mrsheen
    Free Member

    I would focus on fit and comfort first. Most will handle anything barring more extreme conditions like thick mud where tread clearance comes into play. Wet rock is something I’m not sure anything truly grips to.

    You’ll be fine with likes of Innov8, Adidas, altra, Scott.
    Maybe consider how much road you’ll be on as aggressive tread feels uncomfortable to run on using road.

    Premier Icon lunge
    Full Member

    All trail shoes are a compromise. Those that are great in the mud are generally less good on hard pack for instance.

    Using Nike as an example, the Pegasus Trail is like the gravel bike of shoes. So perfect useable on the road, great on less techy stuff and hard packed summer trails, but not ideal in real slop.
    Then you have something like a Terra Kiger which is better in mud but less good on the road. I’ve got both, along with a pair of really heavily treaded shoes for proper sloppy stuff, but the Terra Kiger would be fine for all if I had to pick 1 shoe.

    I will also add that, depending on what you run, you may be fine in road shoes. I do most of my summer trail running in road shoes, I just make sure they’ve got a reasonably grippy outsole.

    Premier Icon abingham
    Full Member

    In true STW ‘recommend what you have’ fashion: Inov8 X-Talon 190. Great in the mud and soft stuff, tolerable on hard pack, horrible on wet rock. Also crazy light.

    As above though, the shoes are condition and user dependent and what suits me at 57kgs for schlepping over Dartmoor may well not suit the South East trails so well.

    Premier Icon jimmy
    Full Member

    In true STW ‘recommend what you have’ fashion:

    Asics do some good, non-too-pricey trail-lite shoes which I’ve used versions of for years. Like this:

    https://www.sportsshoes.com/product/asi11665/asics-gel~venture-8-trail-running-shoes-~-aw21/#sku-asi11665

    More expensive Gore-Tex or more aggressive versions are available.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Free Member

    One pair of comfy trail shoes will be fine for all of that.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    You’re looking at a balance of grip, cushioning, stability, fit and the terrain you run on all seen through the filter of your personal preferences and physiology. If any of those is extreme it’ll skew the balance of what you want / like / need, if they’re all somewhere in the middle, most middle of the road trail shoes – provided they fit your feet – will work.

    Go try some on in a good running shop and talk to the staff about the sort of surfaces you expect to run on and whether you like a lot of cushioning etc, would be my take.

    Premier Icon ovoderbars
    Free Member

    Thanks for replies. Ended up with a pair or Saucony Peregrine 11 in size 10 (usually a 9.5 in Brooks shoes)

    Tried the Brooks Cascadia and the Hoka Speedgoat but the Peregrine seemed to be the best fitting and will hopefully be the more versatile for where I’m planning to run.

    I’ve tried on about five different models of Hoka’s in the past few months. None of them have felt right.

    Premier Icon toby1
    Full Member

    I’ve tried on about five different models of Hoka’s in the past few months. None of them have felt right.

    Some companies don’t fit some feet in my experience. I wear nike trainers almost constantly these days, although weirdly I never buy Nike for actual running shoes, always for walking/day-to-day use.

    Premier Icon Pierre
    Full Member

    I don’t know if this helps, but I’ve found trail shoes by the same people who made my running shoes worked. When I ran in Nikes, I bought Nike trail shoes.

    I really like my current Mizuno Wave Rider 22s, so bought Mizuno Wave Kien 3s and have enjoyed them. But, like everyone else says, it’s more important to get the right shoes for your fit and your running style.

    Premier Icon ovoderbars
    Free Member

    I thought the Brooks Cascadia would fit me as every Brooks shoe I’ve tried before fit perfectly but they were a little off.

    Looking forward to couple of hours with the Peregrines at the weekend. Will be interesting to run the trails I usually bomb down on my Marin.

    Premier Icon dovebiker
    Free Member

    From the bits of the NDW I’ve run at the Dorking end in winter I’d want grip over anything else as you’ve got clay over green chalk which is very sticky and almost zero friction in the wet. In summer, when baked hard and worn smooth, you’ll get away with any shoe. The problem with some stripped back shoes like the Inov-8 talons named above is that they have very little cushioning which might be tough if you’re running on mixed surfaces or haven’t got some base running fitness. I have about 6 shoes going at any one time because you’re lucky in many cases to get more than 1,000km from a pair. Sportsshoes have some good deals on right now – Scott RC are pretty good, have good grip for most surfaces and yet have some midsole cushioning.

    Premier Icon bentudder
    Full Member

    @dovebiker – I run the same bits as you, probably. Likely a lot slower. Just did a loop of Denbies for the first time in ages this morning and remembered why I got hooked. I’m on my second pair of XT7s from Decathlon. Not super-spendy and seem to be well padded. I seem to get on with Mizuno road shoes which suit my shovel-like plates of meat. The XT7s seem to be OK on the road – certainly enough that if I’ve taken running shoes on holiday and not known what I’d be running on, the XT7s go in the bag. HTH

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