Trail dogs

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  • Trail dogs
  • hexhamstu
    Member

    1) Who has one?
    2) How far do you ride with him/her?
    3) Do you feed them while out?
    4) If so what?

    steviegil
    Member

    1 – in the process of moulding one..
    2 – so far longest we’ve been is 10 miles at her pace, she is only 11months but would run herself to death so we have to be careful!
    3 – currently garlic sausages, as she is a wee shite for getting the scent of deer, so something tasty to get her back..
    4 – springer spaniel, mental/hyperactive but so lovable!

    I’ve got 3 border collies that run with the MTB
    They run up to 40 mile runs no problem but over the years have built them up to that level
    They are like sponges the more you do the fitter they become the more they do
    I am very carefully on hot days as dogs suffer in the heat let alone exercise hard
    I don’t feed them whilst out but give them food after exercise
    Be carefully on hard rock type terrain as this terrain heats their pads and can cause blisters
    I run them round all the 7 stanes easily
    You have to train them to run with the bike
    All my mates love them and miss them if I don’t bring them
    Plenty of water stops. Rivers etc
    If they pick up an injury cut paw or strain. Min 3 weeks rest ( they go mental if left in the house whilst recuperating)
    Hope this helps

    Oh make sure they don’t do their business on the trails Nothin worse on a trail if they do. stop remove or flick off the trail …..

    As above really . Have a lab springer x who loves a run out with the bike . She did not need any real training although when she was a pup i would ride round the garden just to get her use to it .

    andypaul99
    Member

    I go riding with my 3 year old Collie, i havent covered more than 10 miles with her as i tend to ride quite constantly fast in the flat forests of Suffolk!

    Normally stop halfway if its hot so she can drink, took her out yesterday and stopped but she wasn’t thirsty so obviously depends on the temperature

    Dont forget when you are riding you will approach wildlife quickly, and the dog will notice first. There have been several times she shot off to chase a squirrel or deer so i have to constantly be aware of where she is, i also modify my route so im not near farmers fields (she chased a piglet once) and roads.

    Can’t get the video embedding to work, but here’s mine in action:

    Riley The Spaniel

    He’s still a pup really, but he’ll do about 8 miles. Regular topping up with water is essential though!

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    1: yes, 5yr old border collie called spike
    2: hour and a half at most. Lots of river crossings in summer to keep him cool
    3: never
    4: see above

    I[video]http://vimeo.com/67476747[/video]

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Subscriber

    1) 3y/o border collie.
    2) 15 -25k, we’re aiming to slowly build this up to about 30. She can happily manage the red at GT or Dalby.
    3) Nothing, just lots of water stops. You can actually train a dog to drink sprinkles from a camelbak. You can’t “carb-load” a dog, they work differently: deriving energy from protein and fat. Wagg working dog is awesome for this. Never, ever feed just prior to exercise as you run the risk of bloat.

    ooh: ruffwear boots and socks are great, assuming you can get them to stay on.

    surfer
    Member

    I have a 7 year old Lakeland Terrier who doesnt really like to run with me despite her being fit an able. Bit disapointing really but she is a much loved family pet.
    I wanted a dog that I could run on the paths/countryside around where I live and for days on the fells etc so I will be picking up a Cocker puppy on Monday. Kids made up and in 12 months she will be coming for days out with me πŸ™‚

    yorkshire89
    Member

    [video]www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmEzcV9eB7s[/video]

    Our Doberman loves a run out with the bike. Would happily stay out all day when its cold but if its a warm day I wouldn’t really ride for more than 2 hours, and would always ride somewhere with a stream she can cool down in.

    Only problem is trying to keep infront of her!

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Subscriber

    @steviegil

    You know dogs should never eat garlic, food containing garlic or indeed any bulbous plant, such as onion, leek etc, as it makes them anaemic?

    Also off the menu are: cooked poultry bones, chocolate and macadamia nuts.

    scruff
    Member

    Yes, a Dalmation.

    Used to do 20 odd miles but hes now 9 so I limit the mileage, nothing to do with me struggling for time / fitness.

    If out for a few hours I take his normal dried biscuits in my pocket.

    Can we have pics?

    flowerpower
    Member

    1. 2 x 2/3yr old Kelpies
    2. Still building up, most so far 30k, but adding in extra stops at the mo (not that they stay still when I stop!)
    3. Never. They normally get 2 meals a day split 50/50. On a riding day they get less in the morning and more in the evening (so 30/70). Try to get up early to feed them so they have a couple of hours before running.
    4. N/A – but regular water breaks. Mostly streams, but carry a collapsible bowl and only have pure water in my camelback, so always have a back up.

    My main concern is what i would do if one got injured when I am in a remote area. I think I should have some idea of how to make a bike ‘sling’ from what I am wearing. Anyone had to do that ever?

    Oh, also be very aware of cattle grids!

    steviegil
    Member

    hot_fiat – Member
    @steviegil

    You know dogs should never eat garlic, food containing garlic or indeed any bulbous plant, such as onion, leek etc, as it makes them anaemic?

    Also off the menu are: cooked poultry bones, chocolate and macadamia nuts.

    It was suggested to me by my vet! Ha. It’s not so much feeding, more a titbit to entice her back, most of the time she gets dried biscuits..

    Some cracking dogs guys, pics are a must though πŸ˜€

    davela
    Member

    You know dogs should never eat garlic, food containing garlic or indeed any bulbous plant, such as onion, leek etc, as it makes them anaemic?

    Also off the menu are: cooked poultry bones, chocolate and macadamia nuts.

    Also (especially at this time of year) are grapes/currant/sultanas as they can cause kidney failure. Our collie pinched a mince pie last year and it was an expensive Sunday eve trip to the vets to get him to throw it up!

    Not tried biking with him yet as he has a habit of turning across the path in front of you. Entertaining enough when running but could be quite a hazard when biking 😯

    Premier Icon sandwicheater
    Subscriber

    We’ve a lab/springer cross (think small/then set brown lab), great dogs!.

    Longest she has been out is about 6 hours while we were on the bikes. Plenty of stops, took some food along and water and let her have a rest in the middle of the ride. In the lakes so large amount was us pushing.

    If less than 3 hours i’d not feed her. Always bring treats along so guess she is snacking. Always seems to find something to scoff on anyways.

    bjj.andy.w
    Member

    1. Yep, 4yr old Rhodesian Ridgeback called Rogue.
    2. Generally one mid week lap of Gisburn so around 10.5 miles
    3. Yep, take a few of his treats with me to give to him every so often on the way round.
    4. See above.

    dantsw13
    Member

    Honest question – if a dog is running behind you, how can you tell if it has had a dump on the trail, or are they just exceptionally well mannered? Eating Dog Poo from my Camelbak mouthpiece flicked up from the SDW wasn’t a highlight of my summer.

    I’d love a dog, but sadly spend too much time out of the country πŸ™

    joolsburger
    Member

    Ive a two year old poodle labrador cross who does between 10-20 miles each outing. I wouldn’t want him to do more and built up to that maximum over the last six months. Plenty of ponds on my route for cooling down and a gluten free nana bread in peaslake sees him good. Check pads at each stop as its easy for them to get cut.

    Took about two rides to get him to run behind me consistently. He tends to do his filthy business near the car which I bag up immediately. He can’t poo and run at the same time!

    m_t_b
    Member

    1. Yes 1 year old Lab/Hungarian Viszla called willow
    2. 1 ride a week trying to build it up usually about an hour but going to try a bit longer now as she gets home and still has shed loads of energy
    3. No food when out but have something for after.
    4. Just dry dog biscuits.

    Was a bit paranoid at start about her getting stuck in the wheel (when I was 8 my bearded collie decided to put her paw into my chainring so a bit scarred…) but she is very aware of me and keeps 2-3 metres behind and I now trust her.

    duir
    Member

    There are a lot of misconceptions about dogs particularly the seemingly fitter breeds. People imagine they can be run for 10’s of miles but many dogs by genetics are designed to stalk and hunt. That involves sprinting and resting and would rarely involve running at MTB pace for 30k’s! I have seen people damage their dogs by making them run all day, the dog appears to keep up so you think they are happy. Unfortunately a dog will not tell you they are wrecked and will run to the death if need be to keep up with the pack leader ie you. I recently was on a big Scottish mountain ride over 6 hrs where a member of the group’s dog was clearly wasted yet they offered them no food or water and just kept riding. The dog’s paws were shredded and it could barely walk the last mile to the car.

    So if you do get a trail dog, pay very close attention to their diet and build them up/condition them very gradually. During rides give them lot’s of chances to recover and access to food/water and if the dog looks fecked then get off and walk.

    My current border collie is the fittest most lean border I have owned but I wouldn’t ride him for 30k’s they are not genetically designed for that. He would however happily work sheep for 8 hrs a day or search/stalk things but that’s at his pace which is stop start and how he was made.

    Maybe a sled dog would be a better breed and they only need feeding once every 2 days!

    flowerpower
    Member

    @ dantsw13

    I ride with two dogs, one is up front, the other on my back wheel. I have bells on them both, so that I know without looking if one has stopped or deviated from the trail.

    However – they just don’t do it! Not when you are going at a pace, they are totally focussed and either ‘working’ or running with their pack (however you see it), but they wouldn’t risk stopping and being left behind. When you stop, or if you are pootling along – then yes they will, but at that point it is similar to if you are walking and they drop back, you look to check on them.

    FWIW – I rarely pick up, but just employ a stick flick into the under growth.

    hebridean
    Member

    I have two cocker spaniels, one has just retired herself from trail dog duties aged 10. She is a show type cocker and could easily do 15-20 mile rides at a very steady pace in her hey-day.

    The other is a working cocker, now 15 months. She is an athlete and will run just in ahead of us or close to the back wheel if asked. Only done 10-12 miles with her so far, having built up the distance since she turned 1 year but I’m sure she is well capable of much longer rides.

    No food on rides (if you do feed the dog whilst out don’t over do it as there could be a risk of bloat)

    Plenty of drink stops in rivers etc. Don’t ride when its too hot. Useful tip if you can’t find streams – carry a plastic bag and use it to line your helmet to form a makeshift water bowl – fill with water from camelback or spare bottle.

    Another tip to know exactly where the dog is (especially if it stops for a dump)is to fit some bells to the collar or harness. You can always hear where it is in relation to the bike.

    Premier Icon hot_fiat
    Subscriber

    Cass:

    The first video of her running two years ago:

    [video]http://youtu.be/l-1-20n1UBk[/video]

    hexhamstu
    Member

    Helmet with a plastic bag in it and putting a bell on him, great tips.

    Also had no idea about the grapes/raisins thing, harry ingested quite a few of them when he stole a flapjack/fruit thing a couple of months ago. Seemed OK afterwards.

    jaffejoffer
    Member

    1) Yep, well not specifically a trail dog but he does come with on solo rides that dont involve any road bits. Larry David is a 2yr old Patterdale.
    2) he has been round most the north west trail centres happily enough, and comes out locally for 2 or 3 hours. i have worn him out once tho, he wont run himself to death which i suppose is good, he just refuses to move any further. ended up carrying him under my arm, felt terrible πŸ™
    3) nah
    4) he might have a bite of whatever ive got.

    Larry likes to run infront which is a pain, so at the top of a desent ill destratct him, lob a stick or something then set off when hes not looking!

    he wouldnt stop for a shite when hes chasing me, but hes mostly up ahead on climbs or flats so I can keep an eye on him…

    Lawmanmx
    Member

    We got a Patterdale terrier trail dog, She was easy to train and comfortably runs 20/25 miles with odd stops for a drink and a treat of cooked chopped liver, she has an incredible turn of speed and is amazingly agile, she clears doubles, tabletops and rails berms waaay better that i do, Lol
    And she’s rode with Sam hill (or should i say Sam hill has rode with her) Lmao
    http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/10402972/

    bluebird
    Member

    My 2p, FWIW:

    Mine’ll do up to 25 miles, but usually our rides are around 15. Most dogs will just will keep going even where they’re clearly knackered, so you need to decide when enough is enough for them. Build up the distance over time and wait until they’re fully grown (around 18 months) before you do anything involving any kind of distance. I trained mine to run with me first, so when we introduced the bike he was already used to staying with me.

    I make sure he gets plenty of water whenever we stop and give him a few treats as we go around. I always give him a bigger treat when we’re finished and he’s got his breath back. I also usually give him an extra small meal to help him refuel. While we’re out I keep an eye on him to make sure he isn’t limping and check his paws at the end of a ride.

    He’s a wirehaired Hungarian Vizsla. Great dogs, all my riding mates love him. Even the ones that don’t really care for dogs.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Brian’s ace 2hottie but wish you’d not posted that second video again it got to me the last time and it did again. I hope he’s loving his new home.

    jaffejoffer
    Member

    hi Lawmanmx

    yeah my Larry is just like yours, its amazing how far they can run and jump for such little dogs, fast too!

    5thElefant
    Member

    1) Who has one?

    Two.

    2) How far do you ride with him/her?

    Not far. More walking the dog with me on a bike.

    3) Do you feed them while out?

    Nope.

    obelix
    Member

    Have a working cocker, very good nature and can run for hours without batting an eyelid. Amazes me at work (forestry) when he’s been on the go for 8hrs, then scents a deer, and chases it flatout it for the next 20min. Nice thing about smaller working dogs is that they’re not genetically predisposed to any of the joint issues that some larger working dogs get.

    Bjj.andy.w, am loving the ridgeback, probably wasn’t too fazed this last summer in the heat?

    Some pics of Crumpet…

    dantsw13
    Member

    Thanks for the answers chaps – the bells sound like a great idea. I guess that also alerts any other trail users to them.

    I guess the reality is as with all things – the good owners care/will clean up, and the bad ones don’t. Probably the same ones happy to leave gel wrappers and inner tubes on the trails.

    Some lovely dog pictures here btw!!!

    steviegil
    Member

    Obelix, must be a spaniel thing, but my springer loves lying in puddles like crumpet is in the bottom one.. When we’re out, there is not a chance mine would just stop and shit, she runs away into the bushes to do her business.
    I think I’m going to buy a bell too, great idea πŸ˜€

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    keith2005motorcross – I’ve seen you, at Glentress.

    Noticed, as I have two Border Collies – yours are lovely πŸ™‚

    They used to come out all the time with me, but I’ve stopped running them as a bit concerned about the high impact of running them on hardpack on their joints.

    I’ve also stopped taking them to trail centers, as it generally annoys some people, even though mine stick 1-2cm from my back wheel at all time – I used to have an awesome video of the final Cwmcarn descents with my youngest right on the back wheel the whole time.

    I still take them out for runs around the local woods for 1-2 hours, but it’s all varied terrain and soft, muddy, grassy stuff.

    Totally up to anyone what they’d prefer, I’ve used mine for agility, heelwork, obedience, training, etc.. as long as you find a way to keep them mentally stimulated, they’re happy with 2-4 hours of exercise a day πŸ™‚ (obviously more at the weekends).

    obelix
    Member

    Steviegil, yeah lying in puddles is his favourite party trick, especially in the summer when the drainage ditches are just gooey pits of slime.

    Rickon, I also leave the pooch with the Mrs when at trail centres, too worried about him getting run over, could well do a dog some serious damage like broken back, etc.

    Just bought a waterproof LED light that attaches to his collar, for night rides. Can see him well with it on, even when he’s in thick cover off the trail. Around Β£7 from Tiso, well recommended.

    myti
    Member

    4 year old, Black lab, she is mad for biking. Goes crazy when i get the bike out. Have done about 15 miles or so but she had a injury so am limiting her to about 8 miles now. She is very quick so is usually up front and knows to keep out of the way. She was trained from a young age to do her business off the path in the woods and will fire one out near the start of the ride as she hates to be left behind for a second. When on a ride she is not interested in anything but running the trail. Other dogs, livestock, normally inticing piles of dung are merely something to be ignored when she is in ‘Trail mode’

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