Trail building isn't it great?

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  • Trail building isn't it great?
  • I am constantly making/clearing/maintaining trails when I’m out walking the dog, always looking for the deer tracks etc like yourself, for me its part of the fun, and I love to share them too and see if others like the trail as much as I do.

    dantsw13
    Member

    We have built loads of unnoficial trails locally, but with landowners permission. It is great fun – riding lines you have made is awesome, and also gives you more insight into how to build more.

    We also cycle several footpaths – but once again, the landowners have allowed us access, so grumpy hikers can do one!!!

    atlaz
    Member

    unnoficial trails locally, but with landowners permission

    How does that work? Surely all official means in this context is actually having permission?

    dantsw13
    Member

    True, I suppose!!! What I’m saying is, we have found loads of land suitable for trails, approached the landowners, but kept it informal. We have deliberately not gone formal, so there is less pressure on the landowners. We keep the entrances hidden, and they are just for us, not general right of ways. We probably have 50 miles of these trails now, mixed up with local bridleways, tracks and forestry commission stuff, it is superb!!

    GEDA
    Member

    Loads of people use some of my trails in Sweden now and those are even better now super smooth, that makes me feel like a proud daddy. Local knowledge is key in when to ride, build and where. Some people don’t seem to know the meaning of subtlety though. There was one lot that decided to build a down hill track round our way and started pulling up loads of heather, big jumps etc in a far too public place.

    GEDA
    Member

    Not the official kind but the cheeky, undercover, shadowy stuff. I can’t stop building, no clearing, cheeky trails. Every bit of downhill or nice dry open forest I am looking for nice lines, old deer tracks to clear, rocks or tree stumps to build mini jumps off and slabs that are good for drops. I must spend 30% of my clearing instead of riding. I do have a few rules like no destruction of living stuff except bracken or grass, a tiny bit of pruning and breaking off of the dead lower branches of pine trees. I try to make it so nobody that came past would think there was a bike track there when ever possible. Just finishing of my mini masterpiece where you roll down a big slab to a 3 foot drop off, kindly lower on one side so you can build up to the bigger drop, Down a steep bank, sharp right hand berm made from a fallen tree, flat, down another rock slab with a little drop at the bottom hard left and more steepness, open forest and out into the open, down a big rut made by a forestry machine, over a little line of rocks to cross a bog and over a few burns on tiny rock bridges, little up bit and then join up with a super fast steep deer track with drifting turns… Woo Hoo.

    I will try to get a film or photos of it.

    Questions though. Do you make your creations public or let people find then. The stuff I have done in the UK I would never make public so for me it depends on where it is. I suppose you also need a large, fairly dry open forest near by so that rules out most folk.

    Euro
    Member

    Sure is. 8)

    For a while last year, I probably did more building than riding. This year I began a fairly big project, but got injured at the start of April and haven’t lifted a spade since. Hope to get it finished over the winter if I heal up in time.

    Not exactly subtle but there’s maybe only 5 people who know where it’s being (not) built.

    GEDA
    Member

    Looks cool. I was thinking of building some stuff in the garden to practise jumps and drops. Nothing that big but it is great to build your own stuff as you can work up to the big stuff.

    Last Sunday’s club ride was part taken up with working out where to put our tinkering effort this winter. More scouting needed to see if the proto-line we are considering will really go all the way. Then on wet sundays to work with min-saws and a little shovelling. In general we don’t like moving dirt and prefer lines to be as au-naturelle as possible. So mostly it’s about clearing undergrowth and judicious sawing of obstacles to leave the rawest, tightest, thrutchiest line possible. We don’t do “Spooky Woods” style trails! Very few riders, even locals, get to know about them so they get a bit overgrown each year and need frequent re-work.

    yup its good i built this last winter
    http://vimeo.com/36031209

    followed by this

    more to build this winter

    Euro
    Member

    Nice plecos. Sweeeet berms.

    Me and a few lads started building these about 15 years ago. Every once in a while I add a few more. There’s also a great wee technical xc loop that runs behind the trees n the right.

    [video]http://vimeo.com/10881871[/video]

    GEDA – Member

    I was thinking of building some stuff in the garden to practise jumps and drops. Nothing that big but it is great to build your own stuff as you can work up to the big stuff.

    It doesn’t have to be big stuff though. The small rhythm section @ 1.18 looks easy due to the size, but they are really tricky to get because the speed needed varies for each double and there’s a few slight ‘hips’ (and they get closer together as you make it along). Loads of riders have put themselves out of action on these babies.

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