Tidal Power – the future?

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  • Tidal Power – the future?
  • TandemJeremy
    Member

    Its a part of the solution. Tidal could generate a significant % of the UKs usage – thats the nice thing about it – reliable and lasts all day ( tides at different times in different parts of the UK)

    Capital costs are high and maintenance is not easy.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    A friend of mine works for a company who also has a 500kW demonstrator up there which is working well/supplying to the grid.

    I remember reading a report claiming that we could easily generate enough power for the whole UK with tidal turbines

    That may well be true – much like wind turbines though, finding suitable/economic sites is the tough bit.

    don simon
    Member

    I suppose we could put some fatties in the water to generate waves to satisfy the demand during peak times. I think that’s called a win/win situation. πŸ˜›

    qwerty
    Member

    But if you removed all the energy that the oceans generate then the tides will stop and the moon will plummet to earth and kill us all.

    Waderider
    Member

    The only problem is harnessing tidal power slows down the spin of the earth.

    coffeeking
    Member

    The moon is plummeting towards us all the time πŸ™‚

    bristolbiker
    Member

    The only problem is harnessing tidal power slows down the spin of the earth.

    It’s slowing down anyway due to the natural losses between the oceans and seabed in every tide. I’m not losing sleep over that, much bigger effect……

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I dunno how practical it would really be in terms of timing. Unless you make barrages, there’s a dead spot twice a day which isn’t THAT different in terms of time from west to east in the UK. That is, when it’s flat in the Irish sea it’s almost flat on the east coast. At least I think, someone please correct me.

    The machine in the OP’s link – is there some kind of duct with that, or is it just a big open thing?

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    The fact that Kawasaki have stepped in with such an enormous investment shows that tidal turbines have a strong future – its beyond the level of small tech companies now.

    druidh
    Member
    TandemJeremy
    Member

    No molgrips – it is constant – there is enough time differnce. Teh two main scottish sites are the dornoch firth and sound of islay. Turbines generate on both rising and falling tides and these two sites have high tide far enough apart its almost a smooth output.

    No duct needed on the turbine – it sits in areas of high flow.

    If they can show reliability these things look like a really good answer

    bristolbiker
    Member

    there’s a dead spot twice a day

    There is, but it’s quite small, as either the shafts are braked or the blade pitch is variable so the machine produces a near constant power over a wide range of flow speeds. The small window of slack water, slow enough to produce no power, is small enough that regional differences in the tides would (potentially) lead to no net dead-time in a full UK-wide array.

    druidh
    Member

    TandemJeremy – Member
    No molgrips – it is constant – there is enough time differnce. Teh two main scottish sites are the dornoch Pentland firth and sound of islay

    I’d like to see what could be done at Corryvreckan πŸ™‚

    retro83
    Member

    edit already covered above

    druidh
    Member

    Oh – just found some estimates for Corryvreckan

    The maximum power is estimated as 2.3 GW during springs and 0.6 GW during neaps.

    The mean power available over a 25-hour period is calculated as 1.18 GW during springs and 0.30 GW during neaps.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    The fact that Kawasaki have stepped in with such an enormous investment shows that tidal turbines have a strong future – its beyond the level of small tech companies now.

    Yep, the company my friend works for started as a start-up of three working from one of their kitchens, now has a permanent head-count of more than 40, is wholly owned by RR and has letters of understanding for supply for 100’s of the machines.

    Tidal turbines – 29″ of the renewable energy sector. Wind turbines are soooo last centuary πŸ˜‰

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Retro – by having another set 180 degrees out of phase. The two scottish sites are about 2.5 hrs apart on high tides so provide an almost smooth output.

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    which isn’t THAT different in terms of time from west to east in the UK

    even in Orkney tides are significantly staggered in different areas.

    Yep, the company my friend works for started as a start-up of three working from one of their kitchens, now has a permanent head-count of more than 40, is wholly owned by RR and has letters of understanding for supply for 100’s of the machines.

    Ah, your friend is a client of the company I work for, I best behave myself…

    I’m glad Marine Current Turbines have been taken under Siemens wing now too, they are a good bunch.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    Ah, your friend is a client of the company I work for, I best behave myself…

    Do tell….. πŸ˜‰ I also chip in with technical consultancy for him – usually paid for in beer!

    retro83
    Member

    TandemJeremy – Member

    Retro – by having another set 180 degrees out of phase. The two scottish sites are about 2.5 hrs apart on high tides so provide an almost smooth output.

    I suppose that depends quite how flat the output is and how long the dead spot is; if bristolbiker is right then it sounds very possible.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    How many areas have high enough flow? If it really were that easy why aren’t there loads of them?

    WackoAK
    Member

    Tidal Turbine Trial

    I’ve long thought that this is the way to go, I remember reading a report claiming that we could easily generate enough power for the whole UK with tidal turbines.

    It’s interesting to note that they mentioned the weather conditions which was always my doubt.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    If it really were that easy why aren’t there loads of them?

    It’s not easy though – think all the cost and faff of offshore wind, plus your mechanical and HV system is now fully submerged.

    qwerty
    Member

    … so, jet skis don’t actually need engines then?

    Premier Icon zippykona
    Subscriber

    This all sounds quite promising. Lets sell the rights to the tide to someone really cheaply. Then they can charge us a fortune for the power later on.

    ittaika
    Member

    these have definilty got to be a better method than onshore wind farms. scotland already has lots of people who are experts at working in horrific conditions offshore so maintenance shouldn’t be any worse than it is on oilrigs and the like surely? would be great to see these succeeding.

    I beleive Rolls-Royce are doing R&D on tidal generation units.

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
    Subscriber

    I went to a SUT presentation on tidal power a few weeks ago. It really does have a lot of potential, its great that there are actually quite a few different ideas out there how to harness it, and being tested etc.

    But the beuracracy (sp) to implement test rigs is enormous! Things like commisioning a 6-month birdlife review on the area of beach where the power cable will come back to land. Its not easy, but the guys with the brains who have the ideas are pushing forward regardless.

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Subscriber

    Could one be mounted in the pond by the 15th green at Donald Trump’s golf pitch? Just to piss him off.

    Kit
    Member

    Anyone mentioned nuclear power yet?

    Could one be mounted in the pond by the 15th green at Donald Trump’s golf pitch? Just to piss him off.

    He’s more of a wind power man, I believe

    jonah tonto
    Member

    from my kitchen window i can see a 10m tide (swansea bay) i often look at the huge volume of water sloshing back and fore, and think one day…. anyway, turns out the powers that be are more interested in some kind of fracking under the seabed then using that lovely free energy πŸ™„

    i really like the underwater wind turbine type ones as they stop commercial fishing so as a sideline produce a marine reserve – win win

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    Kit – Member

    Anyone mentioned nuclear power yet?

    I am sure Zokes will be along to tell us tidal does not work and nuclear is the only answer

    TandemJeremy
    Member

    There are two ( at least) different wave power generators being installed as well

    winston_dog
    Member

    Tidal barrage appears to be a much better solution.

    The problem with the turbines is that they need to be in high current areas to produce enough power, then the installation and maintenance becomes extremely difficult.

    Even the most powerful construction vessels struggle in a 6 kt current.

    The River Severn is where its at.

    don simon
    Member

    We all could, of course, consume less. I know, it’s all a bit off the wall, but hey!
    That’s the future.

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