This book changed my life…..

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  • This book changed my life…..
  • mosschops
    Member

    Just finished a cheap thriller (book that is) and although it was riotus and kept me turning the page I’ve been left unfulfilled. So literary types/Richard and Judy book club members tell me about your fave… finish the last page sit back, eyes closed and think….

    “yeah man, that was a mighty good thing to get in my head”

    types books

    Only cheery inspirational stuff please, not a Daily Mail fan

    hit me!

    MC

    Premier Icon ourmaninthenorth
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    Brideshead Revisited.

    In fact, I must re-read it.

    JulianA
    Member

    The Strange Death Of David Kelly…

    JulianA
    Member

    VC Heroes by Michael Ashcroft

    Premier Icon funkynick
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    corroded
    Member

    Heart of Darkness (plus it’s short)

    Trampus
    Member

    Anything by Adam Hall.

    MrNutt
    Member

    Little Black Sambo

    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/17824

    I can remember it in my Primary Schools Library, I can remember reading it, I can remember never having seen a coloured or ethnic person and I can remember some of the other saying they didn’t like it. I loved it.

    Premier Icon DavidB
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    Life of Pi

    tonto
    Member

    Just finished slaughterhouse five – kurt vonnegut

    would reccomend it

    Premier Icon ton
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    all the lord of the rings books.
    loved em all, so started them again and read them back to back.

    MrNutt
    Member

    I read the entire published works of Kurt Vonnegut when I was living in Finland, I particularly like Bluebeard (which I have a copy of), the trouble is they all tend to blur into each other and you end up with this weird Kilgore Trout shapeshifting universe in your head! 😆

    Tibour Fischer – The Thought Gang is laugh out loud funny, I think I may reread that actually!

    RichPenny
    Member

    Cannery Row by John Steinbeck. A simple, feel good story with some fantastic characters and great insights into the human condition. I’ve re-read it at least 4 times now and always experience that wide eyed wonder you get when you know you’ve learnt something special. Has a sequel as well, Sweet Thursday, which is equally inspiring.

    Mind you, I am a huge Steinbeck fan, slowly working my way through all of his books. My favourite is East of Eden, but that has a fair amount of unhappy material so doesn’t really fit your criteria. I would urge anyone to read it though, amazing book.

    MrNutt
    Member

    I’m with you on Of Mice & Men, awesome book!

    Premier Icon ton
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    of mice and men is good too.
    was that john steinbeck.

    RichPenny
    Member

    Which is the Vonnegut book with the artist doing a massive mural in it, is that Slaughterhouse 5? Got that here, guess I could re-read it and find out 😉

    Brown
    Member

    The Old Man and the Sea.

    Short, sweet and the best book I’ve read (and I’ve read a lot – I did English lit at uni).

    twohats
    Member

    Any of the Jack Reacher books by Lee child.

    RichPenny
    Member

    I found Of Mice And Men one of his least satisfying books to be honest. Struggled to feel empathy with most of the characters for some reason. I’ll give it another go I think. Not sure why this and Grapes of Wrath are chosen as study material in schools, as they are his most depressing books (albeit great stylistically, especially GoW). I’d have taught Tortilla Flat, which is a riot. Admittedly, the subject matter of drunkenness, womanising and petty theft might not go down well with the authorities 🙂

    alpin
    Member

    the bible……….

    may god be with you.

    Trampus
    Member

    “The Wrath of Grapes” has probably been the biggest influence in my life! 🙄

    colande
    Member

    changed my life

    pretty strong!
    no fictional book has changed my life, doubt one ever will

    Cyclecraft by john franklin, is definitely a book that will open your eyes! this is the bible for anyone who rides on the road,

    sorry not a “story book” but it’s inspirational stuff
    http://www.cyclecraft.co.uk/

    Premier Icon nickc
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    The Biggest effect? Necessary Illusions by Noam Chomsky completely changed my world view when I first read it, I still dip into it occasionally now. The other was a copy of The Ascent of Everest I found in a second hand book shop, by John Hunt himself. Amazing what they did without the technological backup we all seem to take for granted nowadays. Extraordinary.

    squin
    Member

    Ranaulph Fiennes – The Feather Men. I challenge you to not be amazed/confused/scared/intruiged as whether it is fact or fiction.

    One of the best books I’ve ever read.

    cuspidor
    Member

    Auto Da Fe

    Elias Canetti. If you can find a copy .

    One of the most compelling things I’ve ever read.

    In Auto-da-FĂŠ no one is spared. Professor and furniture salesman, doctor, housekeeper, and thief all get it in the neck. The remorseless quality of the comedy builds one of the most terrifying literary worlds of the century.”–Salman Rushdie

    Just finished…The God of Small Things…yeh I know…10 years since its release…….stunning!

    antigee
    Member

    another vote for The Old Man and the Sea and/or Islands in the Stream – Hemingway’s fiction is fantastic

    antigee
    Member

    as to a book that has changed my life

    Herman Buhl’s Nanga Parbat Pilgrimage

    nothing is impossible

    Anything by Richard Brautigan.

    Digimap
    Member

    “Who Moved my Cheese” – Spencer Johnson

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
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    Second vote for “Who moved my cheese”

    Premier Icon coolhandluke
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    The bomb maker by Stephen Leather was a very good read
    ÂŁ2 in Asda at the moment.

    Vulcan 607 is tops

    surfer
    Member

    The ragged trousered philathropists by Robert Tressell. It had a huge and lasting impact on me. I re-read it occasionally

    “Keep the Aspidistra flying” George Orwell

    “A day in the life of Ivan Denisovitch” Alexander Solzhenitsyn.
    “Post office” Charles Bukowski.

    Premier Icon takisawa2
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    War & Peace. 😀

    Its been out a few years but I remember “The strange case of the dog in the night time” being particularly enjoyeable.

    duntmatter
    Member

    Vurt – Jeff Noon

    Premier Icon igm
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    Crow Road – Ian Banks

    Or

    On the Road – Jack Kerouac

    Reluctant
    Member

    You lot have read some good books! I love Cannery Row, Catch 22, Keep the aspidistra flying, and recommend them all – they all make me laugh.
    As something more up to date and lighter , how about some Tom Robbins? “Even cowgirls get the blues” and “Jitterbug perfume” are both awesome little books, well written and very funny. And what about Flann O’Brien’s “Third policeman”?

    srrc
    Member

    “Systems thinking in the public sector” John Seddon.

    More readable than it sounds, explains clearly why the last 10 years of “command and control” from central government has been such an expensive disaster.
    Instinctively thought that spending twice as much on the NHS and getting a worse service wasn’t good, this book explains.

    case
    Member

    On the Road – was the book for me when I was a teenager.

    Recent books that have done it for me would include JPod and Life After God by Douglas Coupland. Engleby by Sebastian Faulks. The Arabesk Trilogy by Jon Courtney Grimwood or Syrup by Max Barry (the funniest book I have ever read).

    Ratfighter
    Member

    Kinda got beaten to it but definitely
    On the road by Jack Kerouac. It made me realise that I too was spending every moment just chasing that last hairpin turn too

    The other and more sporting focussed I suppose was
    the mind gym by Gary Mack. Virtually every page turned was met with “I do do that!!” Helped me a lot with “head based” issues in my Archery

    case
    Member

    Oh, I forgot to add anything by William Gibson or John le Carre. (Gibson’s early stuff is more sci-fi but the recent stuff like Spook Country are pretty straight thriller material).

    finbar
    Member

    Bit of a cliche but War and Peace is geniunely amazing. It’s such an epic, and you spend so long (entire lifetimes almost) with the characters, it’s like a part of my was missing when i finished reading it.

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