Viewing 40 posts - 6,401 through 6,440 (of 7,083 total)
  • The Annual Running thread – beginners/ultras/whatever
  • firestarter
    Free Member

    Turboferret I can change course mid run if I am already on a course but I cant start one after I’ve started an activity

    Keva
    Free Member

    I’ve just started again over the last couple of months. I’m not entirely alien to running as I used to do a fair bit 10yrs or so back, and have always done shuttle runs as part of PT sessions.
    I built up to a 5.75mile cross country which I did at the end of October, and I felt great after that.
    >
    Distance
    5.72 mi
    Pace
    8:30 /mi
    Time
    48m 39s

    and then had a go a a pavement run a few days later which I managed to do a bit quicker but boy did that beat my legs up. I thought the xc would be harder on the body but nope, tarmac hurts me more unless the extra pace did it, probably a bit of both tbh.
    >
    Distance
    5.17 mi
    Pace
    7:50 /mi
    Time
    40m 35s

    Didn’t do anything for three days after that so now I know I need to back off a bit as I’m obvs trying to do too much too soon. Still not too shabby for the wrong side of 50.

    thecaptain
    Free Member

    Learning to run steady/easy pace rather than battering yourself each time you go out is a key skill to enjoying it IME. Save the hard efforts for when you want to really go for it. Means you can still go out for a run when you don’t have the enthusiasm for a tough one.

    I’m looking to get back into proper running over the winter after mostly zwifting/cycling for the past year or so. Getting bored with zwift TBH, it’s the same thing time after time. Had a couple of runs in the lake district over the weekend and really enjoyed being outside though I did manage to trip and bang my knee quite hard. Got one month to get in decent shape for an upcoming 10k, then I’ll be into the marathon training plan.

    didnthurt
    Full Member

    Was meant to go for a run tonight but I’m totally knackered from riding at the Hermitage, them trails really beat you up but they’re so much fun!

    nickjb
    Free Member

    Learning to run steady/easy pace rather than battering yourself each time you go out is a key skill to enjoying it IME. Save the hard efforts for when you want to really go for it. Means you can still go out for a run when you don’t have the enthusiasm for a tough one.

    This is something I’m just getting the hang of. Dropping the pace a bit means I can go further and feel pretty good the whole way. Great for enjoying your surroundings. I’ve been exploring the local area and getting some exercise. It’s surprising how much is within running distance

    marksnook
    Free Member

    I love running slow, just feels so relaxing! I read some stuff about running slower making you quicker long term as it builds base fitness. Probably explained that so it makes sense!

    Feel like I’ve got my running mojo back a little so far this month. Also absolutely loving riding my bike though so there is a constant internal battle!

    Just saw an Instagram post about the 496 challenge. Basically through January you run the amount km’s for the date so 1km on day one then 2km on day 2 and so on. It all adds up to 496km by the end of January. Not sure I will make it the whole month but I could get half way maybe

    lunge
    Full Member

    Just saw an Instagram post about the 496 challenge. Basically through January you run the amount km’s for the date so 1km on day one then 2km on day 2 and so on. It all adds up to 496km by the end of January. Not sure I will make it the whole month but I could get half way maybe

    I saw this too.
    The last week is pretty brutal, I run high mileages but even I’d struggle with 9 runs of half marathon and above on the bounce.

    marksnook
    Free Member

    Yeah it sounds tricky, you could split some runs I guess between am/pm but it’s still so much mileage

    lunge
    Full Member

    If you could spread it evenly over 4 weeks it’s very doable, 77 miles/123km per week is high but not silly.
    That last 7 days in that format are 196km/121 miles. That’d be brutal.

    turboferret
    Full Member

    Indeed, I’ve run over 200km in a week a few times, and it’s not something to take lightly.  You could argue that you’re conditioning your body as you go, but it’s a rapid ramp-up from very little at the start, so a great way to potentially injure yourself

    root-n-5th
    Free Member

    The minimalist thing is interesting. I started running just over two years ago properly and started with minimalist shoes, got a bit injured, switched to normal shoes and still got injured.
    I think I slowly improved my form and built up muscles and have now found Altra zero drop with cushioning brilliant, and inov-8 zero drip for mud equally impressive.
    I guess I’ve got used to it, but I have Hokas with 4mm drop and they don’t feel any different, just far too narrow.
    I’ve always spent a lot of time walking around in socks at home and try to avoid big heels in shoes.
    A recent endorsement of Altra is my recent marathon where I had zero foot and lower leg issues – just my usual glute and adductor soreness which is because I don’t do any strength work. Comfortable feet all the way. Lovely.
    I would probably recommend normal shoes. Most people wear them.

    XC at Denbies today. The inov-8 Terra law will be used. 9km so a bit longer than the usual XC, but looking forward to it.

    barrysh1tpeas
    Full Member

    Altras look good, especially the toe box. I’ve tried on a pair of Hoka Clifton, how to people get their feet in those?! So damn narrow.

    I run mid/forefoot (I think), so less drop would be better.

    akkwlsk
    Free Member

    Hi! I wanted to start running regularly for over three years, had three tries, but never really made it. It was always some kind of pain in my knees after first month, or just awful weather that kept me from running 2-3 times a week, or I just didn’t enjoy it.

    Two months ago I bought myself a garmin watch and it’s a gamechanger. I have a problem with a very high heart rate (like 180bpm on average in a 5km run) and I didn’t realize it!
    I have to admit that running is a completely different type of exercise to cycling, and even having a basic monitor helps a lot. Now I can deal with HR and not wear out myself during the first 2-3 km of the run. If you are a beginner like me, I highly recommend getting one.

    Today I had the longest run, over 8km in an hour. I feel good and look forward to my next run, which is a huge achievement for me.

    Have a nice day everyone 🙂

    johndoh
    Free Member

    Well done akkwisk – but depending on your age, 180bpm isn’t necessarily that high. I tend to run at between 155 and 160bmp average on runs of around 6 miles (54 yrs old) but it doesn’t feel that hard an effort and I could definitely go harder. I couldn’t keep that sort of HR up for an hour on a bike – I do spin classes where I feel like I am dying and max out at about 165bpm but that is just for short blasts – an average over 30 mins is usually around 135bpm.

    prezet
    Free Member

    Interesting thread this. I’ve just started running for the past few weeks. I think I have a ok level of fitness, so I started out on some 4k runs every other day for the first couple of weeks. Recently I’ve moved this up to 6k. I average around 9 minute miles.

    I’m not sure if I enjoy it or not. I like the idea of doing a run, and I like it after I finish my run… it’s just the actual process of running that I’m not sure I enjoy 😀

    I feel like my pace is quite slow (but steady), but it’s about all I can do. I see lots of my friends around the 7.30 minute miles and feel like I’ll never hit that kind of pace.

    johndoh
    Free Member

    I see lots of my friends around the 7.30 minute miles and feel like I’ll never hit that kind of pace.

    It will come if you are running 6k in 9 min miles after a few weeks.

    sirromj
    Free Member

    I’m not convinced you have to run as much as possible for it to be worthwhile. Depends what your goals are I guess. I’m not planing to run a marathon. Perhaps a half Marathon one day. Twice a week is good for me, three runs when I get the bug for it!

    sirromj
    Free Member

    Just realized my calculations for reaching 250 miles at the year end earlier in the thread were off and in fact I just need to run 10 miles a week for the rest of the year and I could reach 300 miles. Bit of a challenge for me so would be happy to achieve that.

    stox
    Free Member

    Thought I’d share a couple a pictures from my running clubs trip to The Lakes this weekend. Unbelievably great weather considering it’s the middle of November. A fantastic weekend of running with 35 of us attending and various run/walk options over 2.5 days. Great food And possibly a bit of alcohol 🙂

    crossed
    Free Member

    What’s the best way to prepare for a race?

    I’ve been getting back in to running lately and have entered a local 10k trail race this weekend. I’ve done a couple of parkruns in the past but nothing else like that.
    I’ve raced loads on the MTB in the past and used to go out for a short ride the day before with a couple of short hard efforts thrown in. Pre-race I’d do something similar to get warmed up.

    Should I do something similar before a 10k?

    I’m not going to be anywhere near the front, in fact I’d be amazed if I finish in the top half, but I would like to have a good crack at it.

    Any suggestions/advice?

    surfer
    Free Member

    What’s the best way to prepare for a race?

    Spend years training. Not possible in your case so you cant put anything in before the race in terms of adding fitness etc but you can remove what fitness you have. Early night the night before, eat sensibly and warm up properly immediately before the race.

    lunge
    Full Member

    What’s the best way to prepare for a race?

    Week before think about dropping mileage a touch, certainly have an easy couple of day on the 2 days before the event.

    I tend to do a short run, maybe 5k, the day before with 1 or 2 hard but very short efforts (100m ish) in to wake my legs up. If the race is in the afternoon then I may do this on the morning of the event.

    Food you’ll know yourself what works. For a 10k I don’t think it’s critical, but a light breakfast 2.5-3 hours before (porridge, muesli, etc.) and half an energy bar 45 minutes before works well. Some swear by a (caffeinated) gel on the start line, but that’s not for me. I’d not use one in a race of that length either.

    On the day of the event, I’ll start my warm-up 30 or 40 mins before. A gentle run, a few bit of mobility work and then a couple of sprints to get the HR up. I want to have a sweat on but not be tired when I get to the start line.

    During the race, particularly a 10k, I generally go off to hard, try desperately to hold the pace and have a horrific last 2km. On different occasions this has resulted in both a huge PB and also my practically walking across the finish line.

    lunge
    Full Member

    Quick question, do you actively think about pace when you run?

    It occurred to me last night that in the course of the last few months I’ve raced over 5k, 10k XC, a half and a marathon. This is combined with the usual fast club runs and slow training runs.
    At no point, bar the last 2 miles of the half, have I actively concentrated on pace and often have barely looked at my watch.
    Wondered if this was normal as I’m effectively running on feel, or if others kept a close eye on their splits?

    stox
    Free Member

    If it’s a race I’m always checking on my pace. Find it too easy to drop off pace without realising especially as the tiredness starts kicking in

    crossed
    Free Member

    Thanks for the tips @lunge and @surfer

    During the race, particularly a 10k, I generally go off to hard, try desperately to hold the pace and have a horrific last 2km. On different occasions this has resulted in both a huge PB and also my practically walking across the finish line.

    This has pretty much always been my tactic in MTB and CX races, sadly I was never really fit/fast enough that my body could do what my mind thought it could, usually resulting in me limping across the line utterly wrecked 😂
    No doubt this Sunday will be the same.

    Pyro
    Full Member

    @Lunge – not racing at your standard, but I don’t tend to look at pacing at all, everything’s run by feel. Virtual 10km ‘race’ last year was the only time I’ve ever looked at pace and it was more out of curiosity to see how fast I was going vs how crap I felt rather than pushing for any particular time.

    That said, most of the time I’m orienteering, and there’s a balance of the absolute ‘how fast I can run’ vs the actual ‘how fast I can both run and read a map’ 😀

    alanf
    Free Member

    @lunge – I never ever check my pace for anything, primarily as I don’t wear a watch. I don’t record mileage or time. I do have a rough idea of how far I’ve run and in what time I’ve done it, so I would say you definitely don’t need to be concerned by checking pace. Most people at my club just can’t understand it and rely purely on what their watch is telling them. I see folks in races checking their pace (I assume) after about 200m and I can’t get my head around that.
    I know of one person who forgot their watch for a race and was panicking about it right up until starting. I think it was a 10k and they ended up with a pb, I guess by not being restricted by what the watch was telling them and running to feel.
    The only time I’ve noticed, when my lack of ongoing tracking has had an effect was my last half at Richmond. I’d been on my own for about 7 miles and was caught up and passed by a guy at about 11 miles. I stuck with him and realised I could be going faster so passed him about 12 miles and stayed in front to the end. Maybe I could have held a better pace when I was on my own, but maybe it would have finished me off earlier. I ended up 4th and with a PB so it wasn’t all bad.

    turboferret
    Full Member

    @lunge if it’s a road race and I know I’m in shape, I’ll keep a pretty close eye on my pace. When I set my 5k PB a couple of months back I knew at the first km split that I wouldn’t achieve my goal time if I didn’t pull my finger out and crack on.  I think without that I wouldn’t have gone anywhere near where I managed.  I’ve generally got a pretty good idea of what pace I ought to be able to run for a given distance, so keeping an eye on my watch has helped me get quicker over the years.  However when races don’t quite go to plan, ie you’ve gone off faster than you should have done, the watch can make for depressing viewing 😮

    For XC the watch is somewhat irrelevant, but nice to track the race for posterity/post run analysis.

    surfer
    Free Member

    I never really used my watch as a guide during races themselves. From a practical perspective it is hard to look at a screen during a hard effort, also average times vary a fastish start which is necessary in a race may skew average mile times for example. Also its a race not a time trial so at certain points you may put out more effort to hang onto a group for example, at some points you may run marginally slower (particularly if you are leading) you have to adapt and make decisions during a race. Sometimes you will get it wrong but sometimes you will run better or faster than you had planned.

    Found a couple of useful websites for anyone who is suffering with shin splints or calf issues:
    Shin Splints
    https://www.pogophysio.com.au/blog/how-to-rehab-calf-strains-in-runners/

    root-n-5th
    Free Member

    I’ll admit I’m a bit of a slave to pace. On easy runs I like to know I’m running easy but usually go on heart rate and feel, the latter of which I have got much better at.
    However, XC apart, as that is dictated to by conditions and the course, I like to see my pace on 5k/10k road races. It motivates me and gives me a kick if I am backing off.
    XC was a disaster last week due to heart rate issues, but I have the Richmond 10k next week so I’m going for a fast parkrun tomorrow to see where I am. I will be checking pace throughout. I have a target, which is massively optimistic, but it will be interesting to see how far off I am, and whether the old ticker can take the pressure.
    Nice photos of the Lake District – stunning place, must go, well done.

    karnali
    Free Member

    So I managed to buy a pair of saucontmy endorphin speeds this week, lovely trainers, in over excitement I did realise I’d bout half a size too big and out the extra space to different model, I always run in saucony. Anyway result is 8km old pair in classifieds if anyone interested

    root-n-5th
    Free Member

    Sometimes it is good to set massively optimistic goals!

    dashed
    Free Member

    I seem to recall a discussion on head torches a few pages back but can’t find it now. I’m going to give a chest torch a try (after turning my ankle again this morning in the dark). Any recommendations from those who are using them? And do you use them with a headtorch as well?

    big_n_daft
    Free Member

    I found as a beginner that trainers were the main cause of my shin splints – and that correct shoes are a real must….

    This and also too much road running, running off road controlled shin splints for me years ago.

    lunge
    Full Member

    Any recommendations from those who are using them? And do you use them with a headtorch as well?

    I tend to use both.
    I have a cheaper Decathlon job on my chest and an Alpkit Quark on my head. If I had to do without one it’d be the chest mounted one, but I find they work well in tandem.

    nickjb
    Free Member

    I seem to recall a discussion on head torches a few pages back but can’t find it now.

    There was this thread recently:

    Head torches for trail running

    dashed
    Free Member

    Thanks folks – thought it was in this thread not a separate one which explains why I couldn’t find it. Decathlon one ordered!

    surfer
    Free Member

    Shin splints are almost always brought on by trying to do too much too soon. Also more common in younger runners but can happen to anyone anytime if you try to up you mileage or intensity too quickly. Shoes and surface may have some bearing but only contributory from what I have seen/experienced.

    I posted a link above to a website that I think may be helpful and dismisses a lot of the rubbish about treating them such as calf stretches etc.

    prezet
    Free Member

    How long should someone leave it before returning to running after a minor injury?

    Some context – I went for a run on Sunday, was in a bit of a rush, so didn’t really stretch or warm up. Within a few minutes I felt a twinge in my right knee when pushing off. I carried on anyway, and the pain got worse towards the end of my run. The rest of the day and a couple of days after saw me hobbling around struggling to put much weight on it.

    In hindsight, it was stupid to carry on. Knee feels almost better, apart from the slight twinge every now and then walking around. Should I wait until it feels 100%, or maybe try a very slow, short run?

    Also this injury happened on the second run with new shoes. Could this be coinsidence, or bad shoe choice?

    lunge
    Full Member

    Bit of a “how longs a piece of string” question prezet.
    If I only ran when I felt 100% injury free then I’d never run. A tweak or 2 is fine, pain or injury is different.
    I’d chance a short, slow run and see how it feels. But I’m no physio and am an idiot…

Viewing 40 posts - 6,401 through 6,440 (of 7,083 total)

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