The difference between manufacturers pads and OEM brands

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  • The difference between manufacturers pads and OEM brands
  • dannyh
    Member

    Kettle’s on…………..

    Now, I wonder, digestives or hobnobs………..

    Premier Icon jonathan
    Subscriber

    The usual answer with this sort of question is quality control. The pads themselves are likely not significantly different, they are cheaper due to lower levels of quality control, meaning you might be more likely to get a duff set and see your pad material ejected into the undergrowth ahead of you somewhere.

    That sort of explains why you get the opposing “these XXX pads are mint!” and “these XXX pads are balls!” arguments. ie most non-OEM pads will be fine, unless you’re unlucky enough to get a duff set, in which case you will hate said make forever more.

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    well, the answer is…. because they’re made of crap.

    Although that said… the Kevlar ones are very good from SStar.

    Or was it Uberbike… I dunno.

    But the Uberbike pad springs are bloody rubbish.

    Have you noticed how the ones that come from manufacturers don’t squeal and squeak like the SStar ones ? Hmmmm co-incidence ?

    nashwaymule
    Member

    So if they last about as long, work about as well and I only occasionally have to bin a set, surely buying 3 sets for the price of 1 makes a compelling argument for OEM ?

    d45yth
    Member

    I’m currently using Uberbike’s sintered pads – no idea on longevity yet, but they work as well as the Formula ones they’ve replaced…4 pairs for less than the price of 1 too!

    Edit – Weeksy, what problems have you had with the Uberbike springs? If there’s problems I’ll use the ones from my old pads.

    Premier Icon Yak
    Subscriber

    Noise levels. I’m on cheap clarkes sintered. I think they are great in mucky wet conditions. Noise level is awful in the dry though.

    strike
    Member

    My own (and I emphasize!) ***MY OWN*** experience mimics that of other components > you get what you pay for within reason ie I’ve used Superstar pads (all compounds) and have never rated them. I’ve used Koolstop, Goodridge, EBC and (currently) Ashima and rate them all and buy which ever brand has the best price at the point I need them.

    I’m sure others will rave about Superstar pads but they just never did it for me.

    As for OE pads, I can’t tell the difference (in terms of feels/longevity etc) between my original Formula pads and the aftermarket pads I now use. However, can’t speak for other brands of brakes.

    rocketman
    Member

    ime (Avid) OE pads are nothing like their aftermarket pads

    fitting the gen-yoo-ine Avid pads seems to keep them sweet

    Premier Icon weeksy
    Subscriber

    Edit – Weeksy, what problems have you had with the Uberbike springs? If there’s problems I’ll use the ones from my old pads

    Pads rattling like a bitch on my Formula RX’s.

    I used a Superstar spring and the back was fixed… I then doubled up the front so it now has 2 springs in and that’s all quiet too 🙂

    Not a major issue… but a minor irritation at the least.

    devash
    Member

    The Germans do Shimano pads for nearly as cheap as the 3rd party ones.

    IA
    Member

    Noise levels. I’m on cheap clarkes sintered. I think they are great in mucky wet conditions. Noise level is awful in the dry though

    Would ditto this about the clarks, they squeal like a banshee when they get hot, and they heat up quick in the dry. Last well in the filth mind.

    Otherwise I’ve been happy and unhappy with cheap pads, whereas OEM ones are always fine….

    I still buy cheap ones though! But I’ve saved my finned shimano ones to use in the alps.

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    Original avid BB7 pads lasted ages and made a right din, especially in the damp/wet.

    Tried the Organic SS ones, the braking’s just as good, they barely make a noise at all.

    They don’t last as long, but they’re much cheaper. I’ll be buying some more.

    Hob Nob
    Member

    Few things for me I’ve noticed, having tried most of the budget options.

    Noise, power & durability are all better with the OE pads.

    The closest I’ve found to compare would be Goodridge sintered.

    nashwaymule
    Member

    When I can buy OEM pads from Superstar / Uberbike / Disco pads for 8 or 9 quid, why then should I spend top side of 20 for the same pads but from the brake manufacturer?. Do they last that much longer, brake better or offer more modulation.
    Basically I am off to the alps in a few weeks and wondering why should I spend nearly 3 times as much per set for branded pads.
    Thoughts……….

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    I’ve used Formula and Shimano OEM and I’d choose Superstar’s kevlars even if they cost the same. I think the exception’s probably Hope, their own brand pads are ace.

    Premier Icon MSP
    Subscriber

    I use OEM as an upgrade to the stock items, EBC red for ultimate stopping power, goodridge sintered for long life and just fitted some of those rahox ones as recommended by basquemtb (can confirm they are excellent). Might try some of those brake authority ceramic for my downhill holiday.

    Premier Icon Speeder
    Subscriber

    Had pretty good experience with S* kevlar though I did have to take the paint off the edge to get them in the calipers and they now squeel a bit but I suspect that’s a lack of use thing as they. went in in Les Arcs over 4 years ago and bar 5 days in Morzine the following year I’ve barely ridden since. They’ve probably glazed over from boredom.

    Premier Icon ndg
    Subscriber

    BTW OEM stands for ‘Original Equipment Manufactucturer’. So Shimano pads for Shimano brakes. Super star and the like are ‘Aftermarket’.

    Just trying to stop the confusion in the above posts!

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