• This topic has 19 replies, 13 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by Kip.
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  • The “child at home I want to put up a swing” thread
  • Premier Icon Kip
    Full Member

    So, as the title suggests, Kip Jr is at home and I want to put up a swing. We have a small back yard with no swinging space to put one up, but we do have what I believe is locally referred to as a “cut through,” essentially a gap between the side wall of our kitchen and our neighbour’s wall. Most houses have a utility room or extension here, we don’t so there’s loads of swinging room.
    I’m thinking we could put up a scaffolding pole using wall flange plates like this here thing (but heavier duty) and use some form of hanger that rotates around the bar, like rope.
    My theory is this will reduce stress on the wall fixings as the bar won’t be moving much and hopefully it will stay in place.
    I surely can’t be the only person amongst the Singletrack collective to have had this idea, so, how did it work out. Or does anyone have a better idea?
    Cheers, Kip.

    Premier Icon nealglover
    Free Member

    How old is kip jnr ?
    That will make a lot of difference to what will work.

    Premier Icon poly
    Free Member

    Are you just planning to cantilever it from your wall or attach to the neighbour’s wall too.

    I’m assuming that if people are building extension in this space that its ownership is not shared? Beware neighbours can be very odd a bout shared space – although not as odd as if you start screwing stuff to their walls without asking!

    Premier Icon yetidave
    Free Member

    that fitting is not designed to take the sort of loading you expect even with a small child. Swinging forces can be significant, in multiple directions.. Unless you have one on each end and two walls to play with? Maybe i didnt read your OP very well…

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Full Member

    Awaits ‘child at home I want to put up a gallows’ thread.

    Premier Icon JAG
    Full Member

    Be careful – the loading on a swing is MUCH higher than just the weight of the child :o)

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    Those talking about load – where are you anticipating point of failure? I’d have thought the shear strength of a couple of Rawlbolts would be pretty high.

    If I’m reading the OP correctly I’d be more worried about the neighbour’s reaction to you screwing something into their wall (and blocking off the ginnel). Definitely talk to them first.

    Premier Icon pocpoc
    Full Member

    Is you living room big enough to swing a cat child in? You could always find the ceiling joists and some eye bolts? All weather indoor swing and the best TV viewing seat in the house.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    It’s not shear it’s pull out

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    If it’s bolted in between two parallel walls, what’s it going to pull out of? The only way that’s going to happen is if the pipe bends, surely?

    Premier Icon tommyhine
    Free Member

    Check that out. released yesterday by the ever resourceful Laura Kampf!
    Just need some plywood and some rope and the jobs a goodun!

    Premier Icon JAG
    Full Member

    I’ve now looked at the OP’s fitting.

    I think Cougars right. It’s all about shear load on the bolts/fixings.

    However – the loads are still very high. Probably not enough to shear 8 bolts (4 in each fitting I assume) but better to check.

    PS; also check with the neighbours ’cause they won’t be happy if you drill their wall without their permission.

    Premier Icon TheBrick
    Free Member

    If it’s bolted in between two parallel walls, what’s it going to pull out of?

    Dispite the two walls because one was naighbours I read it as cantilevered?

    Premier Icon yetidave
    Free Member

    I read it as cantilevered

    likewise. Apologies. Speaking to neighbour would be high on the agenda before buying stuff…Id keep the ropes wide onto the bar, not in the middle however.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member

    Ah, if that’s the case – only fixed at one end – then yes absolutely. That’s basically a dirty great lever and will rip out as soon as you look at it, potentially taking a lump of wall with it. It’ll need some sort of A-frame support at the floating end.

    Premier Icon mogrim
    Free Member

    Check that out. released yesterday by the ever resourceful Laura Kampf!

    That video’s great, never heard of her before – subscribed 🙂

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Full Member

    Literally came here to post Laura Kampf’s video.

    If you haven’t seen her before then her bike mods, tiny house and campervan videos may tickle some interests here!

    Premier Icon Bruce
    Free Member

    The weak part of those fitting are that the tube is only retained in the sleeve by one grub screw so you would need to support the other end. The tube system is quite versatile so you could easily construct something to support the end.

    Premier Icon Kip
    Full Member

    Sorry guys, late to respond to this.
    Kip Jr is a very petite 10 year old (smallest in class) and we have 2 walls running parallel.
    It’s hard to describe but basically we step out of our back door and the kitchen extends on the right and the neighbours extends on the left.
    It’s a rented house and the landlord is pretty good about fixing things to the wall.
    This means one pole, fixed in place at either end with some sort of flange plate.
    My concerns were of the bolts pulling out of the wall, but now I’m wondering about shear!
    I’ll also check out the Laura Kampf video as it looks interesting…

    Premier Icon Kip
    Full Member

    Oh my word, how have I never seen Laura Kampf’s videos before?

    That’s awesome!

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