The Best thing that's happened to a bike since front suspension?

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  • The Best thing that's happened to a bike since front suspension?
  • Three_Fish
    Member

    with your seat up in mostly climbing position, you simply cant do that, so you have to use your body to manouvere and adapt to whats ahead…that to me is where the skill comes in…

    And when the saddle is out of the way, you’d just sit there like a lump? More fool you, I say. With the saddle out of the way, there is more scope for finding and maintaining a good center of mass/gravity because there’s no saddle to try and work around.

    bigyinn
    Member

    Tubeless (for me at least) is a non starter. I don’t doubt it has its benefits, but its still a little unrefined IMO. If the execution could be improved so that a tyre can be inflated with a std pump every time i.e. out on the trail. Then it will thrive, until it can be considered foolproof it won’t.

    glenp
    Member

    Another way of thinking about this debate is “in which order would you do away with various features?” I don’t use a dropper ‘post (in fact I never drop the seat, choosing to just leave it where I like it)…
    I’d get rid of, in this order:
    dropper post (if I had one)
    rear suspension
    rear disk (replace with any rim brake)
    front disk (well set-up v brake would a sensible minimum)
    suspension fork
    …and even after that lot goes you’ve still got a whole lot of fun, just like the good old days.

    When you look at a bike, a hell of a lot of features have been there for a hell of a long time – diamond frame, chain drive, pneumatic tyres, derallieur gears – when design features pass that sort of test of time it puts other stuff into perspective.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    you can’t compare that seat spring with this new device

    Of course you can. Bears at least as much relation to these new fangled droppy posts as a RS-1 does to a Revelation.

    _tom_
    Member

    cheers tom, no idea what that is but cheers all the same

    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=trolling

    ๐Ÿ˜›

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    If the execution could be improved so that a tyre can be inflated with a std pump every time i.e. out on the trail.

    Why would you be trying to seat a tubeless tyre from flat whilst out on the trail? For those of us who aren’t fools it is a big step forwards – almost 10 years now for me, and still haven’t had to stop to fix a puncture as many times as I did in the single season before I changed.

    gazc
    Member

    lock on grips were a revolution for me when they came out – what a pain in the ass it was changing v-brake levers/shifter before them, still got a can of hairspray that i used to use to help get/stick the old rubber grips on ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

    i think people forget also – forget stans

    proper UST is very very reliable…that is revolutionary, ive not had a puncture in 3 years since i changed to proper ust tyres/rims…considering as above i probably had 10 in the first few months of peaks riding on tubes…

    thats pretty impressive really…not so sure stans system is so reliable etc…

    but UST rims are pretty much a great invention for mtb

    glenh
    Member

    bigyinn – Member
    Tubeless (for me at least) is a non starter. I don’t doubt it has its benefits, but its still a little unrefined IMO. If the execution could be improved so that a tyre can be inflated with a std pump every time i.e. out on the trail. Then it will thrive, until it can be considered foolproof it won’t.

    1. UST rim + UST tyre will go up with any pump.
    2. You’ve most likely got a tube with you anyway if needed, in case you make too big a hole in the tyre for sealant to deal with (although I’ve only had this happen once in 5/6 years of tubeless use).

    glenp
    Member

    I agree that the drivetrain is probably the number one area that could do with improvement. Longevity is not good enough, so as soon as the option gets light and cheap enough it should gain ground.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    not so sure stans system is so reliable etc…

    I’m on Stans now – started with the DIY tubeless conversion described on the original notubes site, before he sold stuff. Thinner sidewalls so easier to rip those, but if you don’t ride over sharp rocks it’s just as reliable as UST. Maybe more hassle to setup, but I’m too much of a weight weenie to want to UST.

    Premier Icon takisawa2
    Subscriber
    backhander
    Member

    Someone needs to tell Steve Peat, Sam Hill etc that they’re just cheating bastards for not having their saddles up their arses then.

    jhw
    Member

    Got to be GPS. Ability to pinpoint your location on a map in whiteout conditions or where there are no obvious landmarks. Allows me to undertake ride options I would never otherwise undertake. I know it’s no substitute for old-school navigation techniques, etc., etc., but really, it’s bailed me out countless times.

    Oh dear. I have front sus and discs on my bikes and see absolutely no need for a seat dropper ( I have a QR) tubeless ( I don’t get punctures often and I like to change tyres to suit conditions) GPS – I can navigate and I would never rely on one.

    What is wrong with me?

    Disk brakes. They work reliably in all conditions and have more stopping power. So you can ride faster and brake later. And they don’t destroy your expensive rims. A huge innovation for off-road cycling.

    Premier Icon AlasdairMc
    Subscriber

    TandemJeremy – Member

    What is wrong with me?

    Where do we begin… ๐Ÿ˜€

    Didn’t front suspension come about years ago, before derailleurs, which is my suggestion as the biggest revolution in biking?

    In the modern era, I think the Bionicon is perhaps the biggest thing from an engineering standpoint, linking front and rear suspension together into a single closed unit. It’s just a pity it’s not as refined as it could be.

    Cheap high powered lights for night riding, hydraulic brakes are great but the lights enabled me to ride weekdays in the winter

    backhander – Member
    Someone needs to tell Steve Peat, Sam Hill etc that they’re just cheating bastards for not having their saddles up their arses then.

    they ride with a seat low so they can hit max speed…..most mere morons on here ride with them low because THEY CANNOT ride steep sections and technical descents at full length…big difference, peaty and the likes could ride it upsidedown and backwards….

    Ok, i think all this comes down to what sort of rider you are and what sort of riding you do! If you do no more than xc then you would probly think a dropper post is a waste of money! But if your more into riding lots of tech steep stuff, that to be honest is so steep that if you had your saddle up you would be out of control then a dropper post is the way to go! and in my opinion is worth every penny! It does get a pain in the arse using quick release clamp all the time, but i only thought this after useing a dropper post! Dont no how i managed without one now! ๐Ÿ˜€ i used to slag them off untill i got one!! Hopefully they will get cheaper tho! ๐Ÿ˜†

    Pieface
    Member

    I never thought I’d say this, but after watching a video of old-school DH crashes, the Aheadset is a revolution in security over quill stems.

    IMO the best innovations are –

    1) Suspension forks
    2) Disc brakes
    3) Tubeless tyres
    4) Aheadset stems

    scottidog
    Member

    very very rarely even drop the seat for mega steep stuff

    If you can ride it with your seat right up it’s not mega steep. Mega steep is when you are buzzing your arse on the back tyre to prevent yourself going over the bars, that’s not possible with a foot’s worth of seat post in the way.

    Three_Fish
    Member

    they ride with a seat low so they can hit max speed…..most mere morons on here ride with them low because THEY CANNOT ride steep sections and technical descents at full length…big difference, peaty and the likes could ride it upsidedown and backwards….

    Your reason is drowning under all those assumptions.

    scottidog – Member

    very very rarely even drop the seat for mega steep stuff

    If you can ride it with your seat right up it’s not mega steep. Mega steep is when you are buzzing your arse on the back tyre to prevent yourself going over the bars, that’s not possible with a foot’s worth of seat post in the way.

    I DOOOOOO ride mega steep stuff, and i do drop it for certain bits – my point is most of the time most people just drop them on easy stuff or stuff they could ride if they actually attemtped it without relying on a dropper to get them out of trouble, i have a mate who drops it even for stuff that goes ever so slightly steep and technical, i still manage most of the stuff now without dropping the seat(willy waving blah blah)….

    all im saying is not dropping my post every two mins on every single steep descent, has made me more conscious about the lines i pick the weight distribution of my body etc which has made me feel better about descending steep stuff and roll ins…i always found with a dropper i drop it at the first sign on of a rocky descent, and there is really no need…it is like cheating in my eyes…obviously most users who have them will disagree, for the simple fact they own one ๐Ÿ˜† but there is truth in it!

    im not saying steep stuff sometimes doesnt require lowering the post, it does some sections of the stuff i do i couldnt physically get that low at the back with the seat up…but most the people im on about with them, at cannock and the likes using them for places like that?!?!

    shaggmeister is right, if you are constantly doing things that are stupidly steep and thats your thing etc then they are brill…but for most riders on here i bet they have no real need for them, other than perhaps once a ride…

    Three_Fish – Member

    they ride with a seat low so they can hit max speed…..most mere morons on here ride with them low because THEY CANNOT ride steep sections and technical descents at full length…big difference, peaty and the likes could ride it upsidedown and backwards….

    Your reason is drowning under all those assumptions.

    they are not assumptions squire, most people on here use them to ease into techincal descents etc, not for most do they buy them so they can go faster ๐Ÿ˜† i certainly didnt, i realised after your quite capable of most of the steep stuff with your seat up if you put your mind to it..

    *excludes certain steep stuff, which is impossible to get weight/body back with seat at full*

    anyways i cannaeeee be harrased with anymore talk of this…

    you love your dropper, good on ya, use it….i dont so i wont…

    its clear its not next greatest thing after suspension…..so i’z wins ๐Ÿ˜†

    ziggy
    Member

    Whoever metioned Aheadset is pretty spot on IMO.
    I remember days of threaded forks and headsets that had to be tightened every week. A right pain in the arse.
    Don’t even get me started on having to cut thread in a few inches of steerer.

    Premier Icon richwales
    Subscriber

    How can you efficiently load and unload your weight on the bike to “pump” the track with the seatpost at full extension? Disk brakes btw – would give up front suspension before them.

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    I remember days of threaded forks and headsets that had to be tightened every week. A right pain in the arse.

    Aheadsets – salvation for the mechanically incompetent.

    ermm get behind the seatpost? im not saying all of the riding can be done this way, but most of the semi steep stuff certainly can be up the peaks where i go….my mate drops his seat for most stuff, and i dont…im just stating its not the be all and end all….heeeby jeeebies folks…there are far more important things that a dropper seatpost….at very worst you can drop it yourself which is effectively a dropper seatpost…

    There’s a difference between shifting your weight back for steep stuff and being able to pump the bike fully when riding flat yet bumpy stuff. Just because you’ve never done it doesn’t mean it’s a bad thing!

    glenp
    Member

    How can you efficiently load and unload your weight on the bike to “pump” the track with the seatpost at full extension? Disk brakes btw – would give up front suspension before them.

    Full extension – even for optimum pedalling efficiency the saddle shouldn’t be so high as to be a total hinderance. I mean, the length of a crank (difference between fully down and horizontal cranks) of clearance over your saddle gives you quite a lot of freedom – sufficient for a surprising range of steep stuff, especially if said steep stuff has a clean exit.

    TandemJeremy – Member
    and see absolutely no need for a seat dropper ( I have a QR)

    ๐Ÿ™‚ ‘Hi Groovers’.
    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiakVIfTW0Q[/video]

    chiefgrooveguru – Member

    There’s a difference between shifting your weight back for steep stuff and being able to pump the bike fully when riding flat yet bumpy stuff. Just because you’ve never done it doesn’t mean it’s a bad thing!

    nothings badddd mannnn its all good and what ever gets you through a ride etc…just saying they really arent all that, regardless how people big them up, they are somewhat unreliable (even the reverbs), and you can easily use a QR to lower it to the same effect….

    but its all good, im sure one day somebody will bring out a perfect one that works all the time, until that point id never even consider one again ….alot of money for a few seconds stopping on the occasional super techy steep stuff

    Jeez, isn’t everything just loads betterer than when I were a kid?

    Disc brakes = brilliant
    Tubeless = brilliant
    Droppers = brilliant (the ones that work anyway)
    Suspension = brilliant
    Maxle = Brilliant
    Etc etc

    You can keep your retro nonsense!

    I don’t have a dropper, but need one on at least two of my bikes. I’m happy to ride my race bike with the seat up and never move it, but that’s a function of where I ride it and the desire to be used to riding down stuff with the seat up as I won’t be dropping it in races. Flowy upydowny trails, such as the Ciaran Path woudl be so much more pleasureable with an uppydownerjobby though!

    Milkie
    Member

    When I was a lad, it was all about anything that was anodised purple or a cycle computer that recorded your max speed, for when going down that really big hill.. bragging rights for 40mph+, eyes streaming and the inability to stop quickly….

    Either Disc brakes or V brakes, V brakes are still damn good if setup correctly, canti’s were just rubbish!

    Premier Icon aracer
    Member

    cantis are still damn good if set up correctly – it’s just that far more people are capable of setting up Vs correctly.

    Premier Icon ac282
    Subscriber

    The problem is cantis go out of adjustment if there is 1 ยตm of pad wear.

    RealMan
    Member

    this is a new thing

    Rim brakes can be quite powerful – my V’s were’t bad using two fingers, on a dry day. And there are even some hydraulic rim brakes kicking around. But disk brakes are just better because they preserve the rim and are less affected by wet, muddy conditions. They can also be very powerful when operated with one finger.

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 85 total)

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