Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 40 total)
  • That 75 Hard Challenge thing….
  • monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Any of you ever given it a go?I’m thinking about trying it and was hoping you folks could suggest some tips and tricks for doing it. I think the one gallon of water a day bit plus the new improved diet will be tough for me.Any suggestions appreciated.

    jam-bo
    Full Member

    US gallon or UK gallon? Details matter…

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Uk gallon I think.

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Stand corrected it is the 3.7 litre one.

    nickc
    Full Member

    This is the stupid nonsense that Andy Frisella (COE of a ‘supplements’ compnay) came up with.

    I thought it was just, y’know, like LinkedIn, a way to root out the gullible and unsuspecting? I genuinely don’t think anyone outside of the Workout-Supplements-Weird-Diet-Bro fandom of TicToc get involved in stupid shit like this, do they?

    slackboy
    Full Member
    airvent
    Free Member

    I cant really understand how that helps anything. Clearly nobody is going to do that for the rest of their life and going back to ‘normal’ afterwards will quickly result in you returning to exactly how you were before it.

    75 days is like the blink of an eye in terms of your health and wellbeing, people should be arriving for what is sustainable and healthy over the long term not a couple of months.

    jameso
    Full Member

    Have a read of this, then decide

    I did, wondering what it was..

    On his website, he writes: ‘75 HARD is the only program that can permanently change your life…from your way of thinking, to the level of discipline you approach every single task in front of you with.’

    I’m out. BS.

    There’s elements of it that would be a benefit oc – reading good non-fiction and outdoors time, no alcohol and a consistent diet. Things that would make anyone feel better. And it’s good to aim for a daily habit because then it’s not a choice to put it off like you can a 3x a week activity that becomes a 1-2x a week, or sporadic.

    It seems better to just start doing something every day even if you don’t hit 45 mins or whatever target. Just start and get into the habit of starting. On good days you get into it, on bad days, well you at least started. That way you’ll be more likely to actually create a positive habit and change your lifestyle for the better, rather than some ‘completed it mate’ boot camp discipline social media stuff where you’re so relieved to finish you go back to your old ways on day 76 or whatever.

    olddog
    Full Member

    Basically you can pick any vaguely  sensible training plan.  Just having a plan and turning up is 80% of it – unless you’re already an athlete and need something specific.

    I had a friend who did hard 75 – she thought it beneficial not just physically but the discipline of routine.  Bit sad for her when the rest of us were having a beer though

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Strange how we didn’t get all this negativity about the 100 day challenge. Guess it’s the February blues .

    airvent
    Free Member

    I think I commented something pretty similar about that one, actually.

    There’s really no point in doing something like this unless it’s either fun at the time, or sustainable long term if it isn’t.

    eulach
    Full Member

    No I haven’t done it but I am interested (as mentioned in the pre-Cristmas 100 days thread). I’ve thought and read quite a lot about it. I don’t think it’s a fitness challenge, it’s about training your self discipline and commitment to improve your mental strength. It’s not very healthy – no rest days and you really don’t need that much water. But if you do manage to complete it, the benefits would be seen in improved self esteem and confidence. If you fail there is also the possibility of the opposite effect.

    It’s a bit like that Alan Carr smoking book – it might help or inspire you but at the end of the day you need to put in the effort and make the change yourself – there’s no magic solution.

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    I think, for me,it would be nice to get to the end of winter in good shape.Not blowing out my arse on the bike in May would also be a pleasant change!

    Longer term, it would hopefully set me up for my dotage, which is approaching rapidly.

    Aidy
    Free Member

    Strange how we didn’t get all this negativity about the 100 day challenge. Guess it’s the February blues .

    I think because that one was for fun, with none of the “influencer” crap around it.

    “75 HARD is the only program that can permanently change your life” is obviously total nonsense.

    If it was just “hey, have a go at this, it’ll be a bit of a laugh” you’d not get the same level of scepticism.

    nickc
    Full Member

    reading good non-fiction

    Yeah but it doesn’t say reading worthwhile or enlightening non fiction, it just says non fiction. You could read 10 pages of Jesse Ventura’s autobiography every day and you’d be following the rules. It’s dumb shit for dumb people.

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Keeping it real positive and balanced there nick.

    nickc
    Full Member

    Well, Andy Friscella has no medical training, no nutritional, or fitness qualifications. He makes claims about the program that he can’t back-up. Which in convenient for Andy, as everything is so vague, it’s not his fault if you fail, right?

    So the major red flag is that this is totally just about temporary weight loss. You can say as many times as you like that its “So much more than weight loss” but when part of the challenge is taking before and after photos of yourself, it’s totally about weight loss. But because its only 75 days, and by which point you’ll be totally sick of your diet you’ll more than likely not, bounce right back to where you were before. So many “wellness” gurus pull this stunt, before and after shots…It’s a marketing gimmick that uses you to sell to other people.

    Taking pictures of yourself everyday hyper-focusses on the physical and most likely for normal people, their flaws. That and they compare themselves to those either bikini clad women, or hyper-muscled men. No one, but no one, needs to take a picture of themselves every day, its a wildly unhealthy thing to do.

    Working out twice a day is un-necessary and potentially harmful. Shall we discuss the amount of time that is? How privileged a life you need to have to devote that much time to exercise? Plus working out is a stress on your body, it can improve if you give it time to repair and rest, but the likelihood is that if you go from a standing start to 90 minutes of working out daily, you’re going to injure yourself, not get fitter. Most actual professional coaches recommend 3-4 workouts a week, and emphasis the need tor recovery and days off

    No cheat days is a stupid rule, that is pretty much guaranteed to make you feel completely shit, tired and depressed, and you’ll give up on the challenge and make yourself feel worse. When you deny yourself something, you just crave it more.

    There is no health benefit to drinking twice as much water as anyone would normally recommend. You’ll just piss it all out again.. Oh, and you’re not ‘flushing out’ anything.

    Crash diets don’t work, exercising too much is a recipe for putting you off doing it forever, let alone the risk of seriously injuring yourself, sure, not drinking or improving yourself through reading are worthy goals, but you can do those things already without all the extra nonsense that these sorts of idiotic wellness-guru shit being sold to you by a man who flogs magic beans* for a living, claim you should do.

    Is that positive and balanced enough for you?

    *Apologies, I understand the modern term for magic beans is supplements, my mistake.

    martinhutch
    Full Member

    Andy Frisella seems to offer the kind of image that a lot of blokes think is appropriate for them.

    Oh, and this wasn’t hard to find. He’s a Tate-loving turd.

    Doesn’t mean that his entire exercise/diet regime is junk, but it should be treated with a high level of suspicion, because the chances are he’ll just roll up to sell you supplements at some point.

    bedmaker
    Full Member

    Sounds a bit daft.

    What nickc said above sums it up pretty well I’d say, although not every internet guru has malevolent / greedy goals.

    Some are genuinely trying to be a force for good, the ones in it to flog snake oil are pretty easy to spot.

    Also, having recently listened to Penn Jilletes audiobook on his weight loss back in 2015, a crash diet can occasionally work.  He’s very much an outlier granted, but a still slim one!

    jameso
    Full Member

    I see. He’s not a guru is he, just a grifter.

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    nickc has basically covered my thoughts. However, I thought it best I respond about the 100 Days of Xmas topic. A cursory glance of that thread would show that there was lots of emphasis on gentle recovery days, short walks, yoga etc. Not only is recovery essential during a training plan, that tends to lead to an easier program to adopt as an ongoing change. I reckon it was also pretty “forgiving” as nobody was made to feel bad about missing a day or two here and there.

    FWIW it’s a good reminder that I wanted to post something on that thread…

    bedmaker
    Full Member

    Correct, I’d say he’s most deffo a grifter.

    Russel brand is a guru, despite what ‘they’ want you to think.

    nickc
    Full Member

     He’s a Tate-loving turd.

    Oh of course he is.

    finbar
    Free Member

    Andy Frisella: An Inspiring Story Of Grit - ValiantCEO

    People want a physique like this choad? Practically every photo on p1 of Google images has him crossing his arms to give them some bulk/definition.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Free Member

    NickC +1

    Like I said on the other thread, I think a lot of people fail because they adopt a “shoot for the moon and if you miss you’ll end up among stars” philosophy to losing weight or training. When really that idiom should be “shoot for the moon and if you miss you’ll end in a horrific fireball moments after launch”.

    The 100days idea seemed a good one because:
    1) mot people have 30-60 minutes free to do something, doesn’t need to be a gym session that takes ~2.5h by the time you’ve commuted, changed, showered etc.
    2) If you “fail” and miss a day it’s no biggie, just carry on as before. There was no weight loss or performance target.
    3) It’s one thing. If you tell someone to get up at 5am, read a book go to the gym twice, not drink and detox on nothing but salad and water. Then by 8am when they’ve already overslept, grabbed some toast and a coffee, they’ve already “failed” and won’t read the book or go to the gym either because what’s the point, you’ve already failed todays objective so why be miserable too.

    Dickyboy
    Full Member

    Another +1 for nickc contribution.

    And re the 100 days thing, to be honest I failed pretty spectacularly but on the back of it I’ve tried to get half an hour in every day since new year and although not everyday I only missed a couple so far, even if it is just a brisk 30min walk. A mix of cycling running walking & swimming has got me to a much better fitness so far & easy to keep up if it doesn’t matter if you miss a day here & there.

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    Except it does because you have failed the 100 day challenge!As some of us over the years have acknowledged.

    Dickyboy
    Full Member

    Except it does because you have failed the 100 day challenge!As some of us over the years have acknowledged.

    Yes, but no one was told to leave the thread or told “everyday counts” in a macho bullshit manner, in fact gentle exercise & getting back on the waggon was actively encouraged. Totally different perspective.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Free Member

    Except it does because you have failed the 100 day challenge!As some of us over the years have acknowledged.

    Only if you took an incredibly OTT view of it. Do you walk back to the car park if you dab on the first climb of the trail?

    And it’s a manageable target, not multiple potentials for failure every day.

    Furthermore, no alterations to the program are allowed. If you miss any of your daily goals, your progress resets to day one.

    Who on earth programs their training like that? No elite athlete bins off a race in July because they had a cold one week in February and skipped a session. So what’s the point in expecting Joe/Josephine Average who still thinks Body Pump and Spin class are the pinnacle of gym coaching.

    And why a gallon of water a day? What benefit does that have? Either it’s too much for some people, or nowhere near enough for others?

    It’s not a serious program, it’s social media clickbait.

    monkeycmonkeydo
    Free Member

    ^Just like this place.Except ut isn’t full of negative,no it  all IT knobers.

    nickc
    Full Member

    Look Friscella’s made up bullock’s is just his made up bollocks, there’s nothing stopping you from making up your own challenge. After all, who wants to follow a herd of TicToc/Insta wannabes?

    thisisnotaspoon
    Free Member

    herd of TicToc/Insta wannabes?

    That and anyone who thinks the 0.01% that rise to the top of the tiktock algorithm get there by bread and water (and the supplement regime linked in their profile) are deluded. It’s tren, clen and at least one variety of body dysmorphia.

    slowoldman
    Full Member

    Longer term, it would hopefully set me up for my dotage, which is approaching rapidly.

    I’ve got to 70 in pretty decent shape without any of that bollocks. I’m a damn slight slimmer than that fat biffer anyway.

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Maybe there are just two ways of looking at this. As a training program (for mind and/or body) it’s fundamentally flawed, particularly in not giving enough Recovery time and it’s unlikely that anyone is going to sustain it after the 75 days. However, as a challenge in its own right, it’s not so different from folk choosing to run a marathon every day for a month or two, or setting a record for cycling around the world.

    Dickyboy
    Full Member

    ^Just like this place.Except ut isn’t full of negative,no it all IT knobers.

    I may be a knober (check user name) but IT no & thrice no – that’s definite fighting talk…

    eulach
    Full Member

    I didn’t know who Jesse Ventura was but I think I might read his autobiography – Navy Seal, starred with Arnie in Predator, WWE Wrestler, bodyguard for the Rolling Stones and Govenor of Minnesota. If I drink enough water, train everyday and taking selfies doesn’t damage my health, who knows where I might end up?

    jameso
    Full Member

    Navy Seal, starred with Arnie in Predator, WWE Wrestler, bodyguard for the Rolling Stones and Govenor of Minnesota

    More stories to tell than most, I’m sure. I read Bez’s autobiography last year, enjoyed it. I was out of the habit of reading and I might have stalled on something needing a bit more thought. Bez has a few stories..

    On this challenge OP – I might have a dig at the credibility of the content or the guy promoting it but that doesn’t take away from what someone might get from doing it* (still think it’s a daft set of activities but hey I’m not doing it so what does it matter.. ).

    I think the value in these things comes from doing what you say you’re going to do despite not being sure you can do it when you say it. BMX rules – if you call it you gotta do it. Or not being a ‘Gunna’ – “gunna do this, gunna do that..” while not actually doing anything. The main thing is setting yourself up to do something you’re not sure you can complete.

    *I was going to say “from flowing through” but that might literally happen if drinking a gallon of water a day for over a month.

    susepic
    Full Member

    So you want to feel better and fitter in may?

    Just do dry Feb and march, and a 12 week zwift program. Sounds a bit more fun…..and no need to support a Tate fanboi w clicks

    jameso
    Full Member

     “from flowing through”

    Ha, posted too early am. “Following though” is what I meant. Any humour value killed there : ) But I suppose a gallon would be flowing through.

    munrobiker
    Free Member

    @airvent – the original aim of the 100 day challenge was to get used to exercising in winter weather using the transition from late summer to midwinter to break you in gently. Essentially, all my pal ever did it for was to keep up motivation and form a habit.


    @monkeycmonkeydo
    – the 75 hard thing isn’t something I’d fancy but if you use it to form a habit and it gets you motivated then go for it. Don’t be a slave to it and remember to enjoy yourself.

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