Texting/phoning from Florida to UK how?

Viewing 16 posts - 1 through 16 (of 16 total)
  • Texting/phoning from Florida to UK how?
  • bukobuko
    Member

    This may sound silly buy IDK, do you use a code +44 then leave out the 0 followed by the rest of the mobile number???? do have to put the Plus +447********* or just 447*********

    nealglover
    Member

    Using your own phone ?
    Just do it like normal in my experience.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    +44 with no zero is standard but for the USA it’s 011 44 apparently
    https://www.area-codes.org.uk/international/usa.php
    or just use skype/google hangouts etc.

    bukobuko
    Member

    Thank guy’s I will try this

    Moses
    Member

    If the person you want to call is on WhatsApp or Messenger, you can call them using the app, assuming you have wifi

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Subscriber

    As above – WhatsApp, Duo or Allo work well between platforms. Just add WiFi.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    +44 7xx is the international standard way of calling an interational number which should be supported on all mobiles. The 001001010111 business is legacy stuff from landlines in the USA I think. When I use +44 7xxx… on my mobile in the USA it works fine.

    wrightyson
    Member

    Whatsapp as it’s free. Use it all the time to keep in touch with my mate in Sydney, and it’s all foc.

    revs1972
    Member

    and it’s all foc

    Only if you steal your neighbors internet 😂😂

    nordboy70
    Member

    You can get a Three payg sim card which includes data, minutes and texts. And the USA is included in their ‘feel at home’, that allows the inclusive stuff to be used. So, if you are calling a UK landline or UK mobile (even if that’s in the usa as well) then it’s included.
    We find it really handy (we’ve actually moved to three now anyway) if you’re away in Florida with family and each of them had a sim you could all call/ text each other like you’re at home. And the data can come in handy too.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    do you use a code +44 then leave out the 0 followed by the rest of the mobile number????

    Short answer: yes.

    Long answer:

    International dialing, globally, is [international access code] – [country code] – [national phone number].

    The international access code varies between countries, it’s usually some variant of zeros and ones, in the UK it’s double zero. So traditionally to dial the US you’d dial 001 and then the regular US number, “1” being the country code for the US. On mobiles however the [+] symbol is a shortcut for the international access code of the country you’re in, which has the handy side-effect of Just Working whichever country you happen to be in without having to edit the number to change the access code as you move around.

    This is slightly complicated by the fact that in the UK the leading zero in a UK phone number isn’t really part of the phone number at all, rather it’s a signifier that you’re making a national (as opposed to local) call.

    Eg. Say your number is 01234 567890. If you’re in the same area code (only really relevant for landlines) you could just dial 567890. Outside of that local area (or from a mobile) you’d have to dial 01234 first – the 0 is saying “I’m making a non-local call” and 1234 is the area code.

    Dialling that number from say the US, you’d first dial the US’s international access code – 011 if memory serves – then the UK country code – 44 – then the area code and local number, giving us 011 44 1234 567890. But as I said, we now have a [+] as a catchall for the international access code. Ergo, this becomes +44 1234 567890.

    So dialling the US from the UK is as simple as +1 [number]. Dialling the UK is +44 [number without the leading zero]. The beauty of this is it will work from anywhere in the world, including from within the UK itself just as if you’d dialled 01234. Every contact in my mobile’s address book is stored in this format so that it all works seamlessly when I’m on holiday overseas.

    Caveat to all this: I’ve found international SMSes to be very hit and miss. I’ve friends overseas who I can send to but not receive from, or vice versa, or not be able to message at all. Of course, this is the 21st Century and there’s a hundred other options to message people which a) doesn’t rely on the mobile network and b) is free. The answer to “how do I text America” has been “use the Internet” for a good 20 years now.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    +44 7xx is the international standard way of calling an interational number

    Yeah… no.

    +44 7xx would be to call a UK mobile number from anywhere in the world. It’s not for calling an international number from the UK as 44 is the inbound UK country code, and (0)7 is the first digit of a UK mobile number as opposed to (0)1 or (0)2 for landlines. And of course, (0)anything-else for non-geographic numbers.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    You misunderstand Cougar. I meant +XX where XX is the country code. The OP wants to call a UK number so I used that as an example.

    Prior to the GSM standard introducing the plus (I think) various countries had different ways of doing it. It was 00 in many, which is why the plus sign is double-press of the zero key. But in the US it varied, maybe I think on different landline providers, and it was different if you were in a payphone or at home. If dialling from a landline it may still be different to mobile.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    You can use Skype to call a landline in the UK as long as you put some credit on your Skype account – it uses IP telephony to an exchange in the UK and then make a local call, so it’s a lot cheaper.

    If the target phone is a mobile then probably better to use WhatsApp.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    You misunderstand Cougar.

    You’re either incorrect or explaining it very badly!

    You said “+44 7xx is the international standard way of calling an interational number” – it’s not, it’s the international standard way of calling a UK number.

    +44 is the UK country code, yes, I’ve no idea where your 7 comes in to anything. That’s the first digit of a UK mobile ‘area’ code.

    which is why the plus sign is double-press of the zero key.

    It was a double-press of the [*] key on mobiles with buttons. It’s a long-press of zero on smartphones (or at least, on the Android phone and Windows phone I have in front of me, third-party diallers and fruit-based devices may differ).

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    You said “+44 7xx is the international standard way of calling an interational number” – it’s not, it’s the international standard way of calling a UK number.

    It’s the standard way, *and here is a UK mobile number as an example*

    I’ve successfully called lots of countries from lots of countries – if I was sticking 44 in front of everything I wouldn’t have got very far would I? 🙂

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