Tell me about running

  • This topic has 28 replies, 20 voices, and was last updated 4 years ago by  emsz.
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  • Tell me about running
  • Premier Icon dazh
    Subscriber

    I’ve always thought running was a dreary boring activity, but after a recent flare up of back problems brought on by stupidly tight hamstrings, caused by 8-12 hours of biking per week and sitting in front of a computer all day, I’m wondering whether doing a bit of running might help.

    Good idea or not? Obviously I’d take it easy and progressively but I’d be interested to know if it’s a good way of counteracting the adverse postural effects of riding a bike lots and sitting down all day.

    PS. I already do lots of stretching and core strength stuff. Just looking to supplement it with something that will get me outdoors.

    Premier Icon cloudnine
    Subscriber

    Proper Thai massage, foam roller, core strengthening and yoga

    piemonster
    Member

    Just out of curiosity, do you have access to good off road running?

    Edric 64
    Member

    I have had loads of injuries since starting running and now need a knee op to repair a meniscus tear !

    Surely stretching is what you need? If you’ve got tight tendons then more exercise is not going to help. Unfortunately i’m getting to the age where I have to stretch before and after exercise. But since i’ve started regular stretching i’ve never been more flexible and feel tons better for it.

    piemonster
    Member

    Just for balance. I’m injury free (once I stopped racing).

    Premier Icon dazh
    Subscriber

    I live in todmorden so I’m blessed with as much trail/hill running as I can handle. Wouldn’t even consider it if it was on pavements or round the park. Also aware of the injury potential. I played football for years (not the same I know) and had various knee issues back in the day.

    piemonster
    Member

    Good god man, get yerself along to the Harriers. It’s a proper giggle on the fells and cheap as chips.

    Not that it’ll help your back niggles.

    Might be worth giving Pilates/Yoga a bash.

    Obviously I’d take it easy and progressively

    no you wont! 😀

    The high impact of running has played havoc with my knees but everyone is different.

    kudos100
    Member

    I started cycling after I could no longer run due to the injuries.

    thecaptain
    Member

    Don’t overdo it. Really, take it gently. I’ve now been running for about 5y, with increasing seriousness, not high mileage but a few races. I used to hate it as a kid, but now I’m really enjoying it. It’s warmer and less hassle than than cycling. But go easy on the joints and muscles.

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
    Subscriber

    I’m on week 3 of the Couch to 5k programme. Aerobically I’m fine and it feels too easy, but I’m taking it steady to make sure my joints don’t get sore like they did when I ran in the past.

    So far, so good, but 10 years of nothing but cycling has left some muscles weaker than they should be!

    And I’m actually enjoying it…. 😯

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    Hmmm, before you start legging it up and down the hills with the Harriers, maybe a few miles more gently along the canal?

    but after a recent flare up of back problems brought on by stupidly tight hamstrings

    You need to be doing single leg bridges and resisted clam exercises, because your arse isn’t working. If I had a pound for everyone who came to me and thought that their core was great, but had tight hamstrings and back pain I’d be absolutely minted.

    piemonster
    Member

    Most (not all) clubs have a beginners/slow section. You don’t have to go straight in at the sharp end.

    My Thursday club runs involves octogenarians, they ain’t quick or long runs by any stretch of the imagination.

    Premier Icon dazh
    Subscriber

    because your arse isn’t working

    Sounds about right. Question is does running help or hinder that?

    Edit: or neither? Will definitely add those exercises into the rest I’m doing but still interested in whether running helps balance the negative aspects of riding a bike lots.

    Premier Icon phiiiiil
    Subscriber

    I’ve been running recently as biking gives me a stiff neck; it has helped with that a lot.

    I never really took the “take it steady” lot seriously until the other week when I did the Bath half marathon with my wife and a friend of hers; lots of biking meant I was fit enough to get round in a time I was very chuffed with, but I could barely walk that evening and the next day and my hip and ankles still aren’t 100% two weeks later. Should have taken it steadier…

    globalti
    Member

    Why run when God gave us bicycles?

    mogrim
    Member

    Sounds about right. Question is does running help or hinder that?

    Edit: or neither? Will definitely add those exercises into the rest I’m doing but still interested in whether running helps balance the negative aspects of riding a bike lots.

    Definitely neither, running’s not particularly good for exercising the glutes. Better than sitting on a sofa, of course, but if you’re suffering from a bad back and stiff tendons running won’t help. I’d still say go for it, but then I prefer running to riding, and am also blessed with trails that start from my front door.

    If you do decide to start running, I’ll add my voice to everyone else’s and remind you to start slowly, particularly the volume aspect. (A short fast run will do less damage than a long slow plod).

    Whatever you decide to do, I’d start following a daily stretching program religiously, ideally with a bit of core + glute work too.

    Premier Icon bikebouy
    Subscriber

    Took me about 9 months of steady trail running before I could start pressing on. I suffered some ankle problems early on and that pissed me off and put me off the bike for a few weeks. Running, trail off road running, was supposed to add to my fitness for cycling not hinder it. Anyhoos after I’d learned the hard way I then broke down the run into run/fast walk/run regime for a month after the ankle injury then slowly built up from there.
    Now I’m not so bad, prefer slow technical trails and cliff running, deep wooded section to anything like parks or pavements. I’n part ive chosen this route because it’s a)slower pace b)more interesting and c)fun.

    I think I started out too fast, thinking I was fit enough and strong enough taking fitness with me to running made my initial thoughts “too easy, let’s pace up” and then the injury..

    So slowly and easy does it, but hey running in the fells and dales sounds spectacular… I’d say get on and do it. 8)

    Mantastic
    Member

    Running is something we did in the 80’s

    ahwiles
    Member

    It’s a zen thing, dude.

    watch out for the descents, they’re brutal.

    chambord
    Member

    I started running again in the new year and after about 3 weeks did myself a proper mischief and knackered one of the tendons in my knee. Horrendous pain.

    I don’t dare do it again, a shame because I had just got to 5km and was enjoying it and getting fitter as well, but I don’t want to be injured and kept off the bikes.

    Premier Icon dazh
    Subscriber

    Right, I’m going to give it a go I reckon. Any recommendations for decent trainers? If anything the sheer simplicity, and lack of expense makes it quite attractive. What’s a good distance to start at? I’m thinking a steady paced 5km a couple of times a week to start with.

    piemonster
    Member

    http://www.startfitness.co.uk/more-mile-cheviot-mens-trail-running-shoes-mm1383-lime-blk-1.html?gclid=CLrb0JXgp8QCFSX3wgodjpgA4Q

    To get you started and give you an idea of what best suits the type of terrain you run.

    They don’t last too long, but at £20 worth a punt if your trying the sport out. Once they’re gubbed you should know yourself what you really need.

    ahwiles
    Member

    what’s a good distance to start at?

    Walk away from your house for 10mins, run gently home. See how your feet/ankles/shins/Achilles/knees/etc. feel over the next couple of days.

    Build your distance and speed gradually.

    Of course you’ll ignore me, and you’ll go and smash out 5k or so. Let us know how that goes 🙂

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    There’s only about half a million different trainers to choose from. There’s no one ‘ good pair’ to recommend. Go to a shop and ask about them.

    Premier Icon dazh
    Subscriber

    Of course you’ll ignore me, and you’ll go and smash out 5k or so.

    By ‘steady pace’ I meant walking/trotting briskly up the hills, running the flatter bits, and taking it very easy down the descents rather than pretending I’m in the Ben Nevis fell race. I know already that I can do long fell-walks at a brisk pace with lots of ascent/descent on steep rocky terrain, so initially I’ll be looking at expanding on that but over much shorter distances. Good tip on the walking out for so long then running back. I’ll definitely give that a go.

    emsz
    Member

    when I started, I just ran the same route for weeks until I got used to it, I think it was just a couple of miles then started to make my runs longer. I think it took me nearly a year before I was happy with it. been running 3-4 times a week for a couple of years now, and I can run 15-20 miles at about 8.00min miles which I’m happy with.

    There’s some great advice on here though. Surfer is especially worth listening to, he’s got answers for pretty much everything.

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