Tax on sugary drinks

Viewing 38 posts - 81 through 118 (of 118 total)
  • Tax on sugary drinks
  • wilburt
    Member

    At least take some care to disguise when you selectively requote only part of my sentence.

    mikewsmith
    Member

    I quoted where I felt it could stop for effect. The why not stops change. The rest of the world is managing this sort of thing, so it appears is Bristol. Bottled water has sat alongside sugar drinks for long enough and done nothing.

    DrJ
    Member

    Well I’ve just managed to get some from a tap.

    You and your fancy ways!! 🙂

    wilburt
    Member

    for effect.

    Now I see what your game is..

    PJM1974
    Member

    In what way?

    I’m a step-parent to a Type 1 diabetic. If he doses himself too much insulin and goes hypoglycaemic then he needs fast acting carbs to stop him from falling unconscious and possibly dying. The best way of getting fast acting carbs into him is usually a small can of full fat cola or a bottle of Lucozade.

    Type 1 Diabetes is auto-immune – i.e. it’s not inflicted by lifestyle as is the case of Type 2 Diabetes.

    mikewsmith
    Member

    And honestly you just launched into a long list of crap excuses not to make things better, that was the point like many people it’s easier to come up with reasons not to. There is no need for water in bottles, people can carry one, not bin it and people can put taps in. As I said every restaurant or cafe here has bottles and glasses it’s part of the service and really normal.

    Like the outcry over leaded petrol, smoking band and seat belts people get used to the new/better ways

    STATO
    Member

    Interesting site for tap water locations. Seems a bit under populated though as it doesn’t even have all licensed bars (one of the few places which have to provide free drinking water).

    mrsfry
    Member

    Drinking tap water depends on the quality of the water. London water comes out the tap and chases you twice round the kitchen before covering you in a hard white scaly coating

    DrJ
    Member

    Interesting site for tap water locations. Seems a bit under populated though

    This is completely friggin bonkers!! “buy a lifebottle” – my arse, just use one you already have! “we create refilling stations” – you mean taps???? Of course the lack of public taps is like the lack of public places to piss water out again – a symptom of the decline of the infrastructure of our poor homeland.

    nickjb
    Member

    Here is the Bristol project: http://www.citytosea.org.uk/index.php/refill-bristol/ No requirement to buy a bottle but they do have them available (with profits to water charity) if you really get hold of one another way

    STATO
    Member

    DrJ – Member

    Interesting site for tap water locations. Seems a bit under populated though

    This is completely friggin bonkers!! “buy a lifebottle” – my arse, just use one you already have! “we create refilling stations” – you mean taps???? Of course the lack of public taps is like the lack of public places to piss water out again – a symptom of the decline of the infrastructure of our poor homeland.

    It is a bit hipster. Mind a ‘refilling station’ should hopefully let you fill a bottle as most restroom taps and sinks (if not mixer taps) are too shallow to get anything but a tiny bottle under. No such thing as a water fountain anymore sadly.

    jon1973
    Member

    It does unfairly penalise diabetics though.

    The best way of getting fast acting carbs into him is usually a small can of full fat cola or a bottle of Lucozade.

    If it’s just a small can does it really penalise diabetics? you must be talking pennies, as I can imagine it’s something that happens that regularly, that it will have a significant financial impact.

    Premier Icon lucky7500
    Subscriber

    mrsfry – Member
    Drinking tap water depends on the quality of the water. London water comes out the tap and chases you twice round the kitchen before covering you in a hard white scaly coating

    Very much +1 for this. Also, and this might just be me being paranoid, I wouldn’t be desperately keen to drink from a public tap in a busy city which had in all likelihood been handled / licked by (tens of) thousands of people and never disinfected.
    I do however think that the tax on sugary drinks is a long overdue step in the right direction.

    mikewsmith
    Member

    Very much +1 for this. Also, and this might just be me being paranoid, I wouldn’t be desperately keen to drink from a public tap in a busy city which had in all likelihood been handled / licked by (tens of) thousands of people and never disinfected.

    Doesn’t seem to be a problem here in Oz. Works really well in fact. The idea is you don’t drink from the tap, either the old water fountain idea or a tap to fill a bottle from. Sometimes you wonder if people are more scared of themselves. As for London water try Adelaide when it’s bad then fit a filter?

    STATO
    Member

    I wouldn’t be desperately keen to drink from a public tap in a busy city which had in all likelihood been handled / licked by (tens of) thousands of people and never disinfected.

    You realise water tends to come out the spout not the handle, and given its a tap it wouldn’t be difficult to wash your hands after. Im sure a germaphobe sensible person would have some hand sanitiser in their purse manbag anyway 😆

    andyl
    Member

    I never knew about that bristol water thing.

    Our new house we are converting is on a popular cycling route (road and mtb) and just next to a long distance cross county walk so I have been thinking about adding a tap on the outside of the wall for people to use to fill their bottles. We are on a water meter so was going to add an honesty box and see how it goes and would probably use one of those timer taps to stop it being left on.

    sweepy
    Member

    mrsfry – Member
    Drinking tap water depends on the quality of the water. London water comes out the tap and chases you twice round the kitchen before covering you in a hard white scaly coating
    Very much +1 for this. Also, and this might just be me being paranoid, I wouldn’t be desperately keen to drink from a public tap in a busy city which had in all likelihood been handled / licked by (tens of) thousands of people and never disinfected.
    I do however think that the tax on sugary drinks is a long overdue step in the right direction.

    You pair would hate the third world 🙂

    Premier Icon slowoldman
    Subscriber

    I wouldn’t be desperately keen to drink from a public tap in a busy city which had in all likelihood been handled / licked by (tens of) thousands of people and never disinfected.

    I don’t recall drinking fountains in schools or elsewhere creating a significant health risk when I was a lad. It was the coal dust on your lungs that got to you first.

    Premier Icon lucky7500
    Subscriber

    I obviously understand the concept of a tap and am actually not particularly bothered about germs in general (really 🙂 ), but 30ish years of seeing people in Britain failing to correctly use water fountains, and failing at even the most basic efforts to avoid spreading cough / cold viruses I’m not sure that I trust the public at large in this sort of situation!!

    PJM1974
    Member

    If it’s just a small can does it really penalise diabetics? you must be talking pennies, as I can imagine it’s something that happens that regularly, that it will have a significant financial impact.

    It can happen more often than most people realise, the body’s demands for glucose will vary according to many factors.

    The cost will only marginally increase, but it’s still a tax on something that could save a diabetic’s life.

    In addition, I suppose I’m more annoyed at the press releases which seem to demonise diabetes without stating explicitly that there are two types of diabetes with very different causes. I’ve had far too many of the “But you shouldn’t have let your stepson eat too many sweet things otherwise he wouldn’t be diabetic!” type conversations with people in the past.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    The cost will only marginally increase, but it’s still a tax on something that could save a diabetic’s life.

    Do you not have Glucogel even if not I’m still thinking what you’re describing is an extreme reason to try and not justify taxing.

    Ro5ey
    Member

    I’m on my way home early to pick up the dustbin lids from school as the Mrs is rushing to hospital to see her Dad… again

    He’s diabetic you see and not to put a too fine a point on it… He’s ***** So many complications.

    But if he pulls through this time and is back home in the near future, he’ll be back on the buns

    Completely addicted to sugar

    But it’s not seen like booze is it?

    You don’t buy the family drunk a bottle of Scottish for their bday. But you sure can buy sweets or another cake for a diabetic sufferer…. Or maybe that’s just my outlaws… Grrr

    Point remains… Type 2 … a disease/condition that the public needs more education in and help to prevent.

    footflaps
    Member

    The cost will only marginally increase, but it’s still a tax on something that could save a diabetic’s life.

    Any change will always inconvenience / cost someone something, but there are more far more Type IIs than Type Is, so overall it’s (hopefully) a step in the right direction.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Sorry to hear that hopefully he pulls through.

    You don’t buy the family drunk a bottle of Scottish for their bday.

    You’d think that wouldn’t you?

    chewkw
    Member

    Some sugar guess here …

    BBC Mag

    Grams of sugar per 100ml – fizzy drinks
    Old Jamaica Ginger Beer Extra Fiery 15.7
    Rockstar Punched Guava 15.6
    Old Jamaica Ginger Beer 15.2
    Mountain Dew 13.0
    Coke Cherry 11.2
    Pepsi Cola 11.0
    Red Bull 11.0
    Monster Origin Energy Drink 11.0
    7 Up 11.0
    Coca Cola 10.6
    Fentiman’s Cherrytree Cola 10.5
    Irn Bru 10.3
    Cherry 7-Up 10.0
    San Pellegrino lemon 8.9
    Vimto Regular 9.1
    Lucozade Energy Original 8.7
    Dr Pepper 7.2
    Fanta Orange 6.9
    Sprite 6.6
    Schweppes Indian Tonic Water 5.1
    Lilt 4.6
    Shandy Bass 4.6
    Schweppes Lemonade 4.2
    Tango Orange 4.3
    Tango Blood Orange 3.0
    R Whites Lemonade 2.4
    Tango Apple 2.1

    Grams of sugar per 100ml – non-fizzy drinks

    Rubicon Exotic Passion Fruit Juice 13.1
    Mars Flavoured Milk 12.8
    Innocent Super Smoothie Energise – Strawberry, Cherry, Guarana 11.0
    Yop Strawberry Yoghurt Drink 11.0
    Frijj Choc-a-Chocolate Milkshake 10.8
    Tropicana Original Orange With Extra Juicy Bits 10.0

    edit: the only drink I would buy is Shandy Bass.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Mmmmmmmm! Ginger Beer.

    Byker Dummies?

    Wanna try saying that in Byker? or would you rather demonise the poor from a distance?

    PJM1974
    Member

    Do you not have Glucogel

    Glucogel works brilliantly if you have seven days notice of an impending hypo. It’s also dosed to bring someone round in an emergency fainting situation – I’ve had to rub the stuff over Stepson’s gums once in the past.

    If you tried using Glucogel every time you had a hypo, your blood glucose would be hugely unstable as it’s far harder to dose for and you’d overdose on glucose.

    even if not I’m still thinking what you’re describing is an extreme reason to try and not justify taxing.

    Oh, I’m not trying to justify not taxing sugary drinks, personally I am appalled at the amount of sugar in a good many brands. Aspartame isn’t much better for you, either so I can understand why a sin tax might be a good idea.

    I am however of the opinion that it’s unfair on Type One diabetics who will rely on the stuff. If you’ve ever lived with a newly diagnosed Type One then you will know the drill off by heart.

    I’ve sat with an aggressive, sweating teenager in A&E who’s being utterly vile and belligerent and have seen the looks on people’s faces when he’s jumped the queue ahead of someone with an obviously broken limb, before being given a bottle of full fat Cola and within the space of half an hour slowly returning to normal, but with a nurse checking blood glucose every fifteen minutes!

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    It’s an obvious target. Tax the things you want people to stop doing. Fizzy drink is how most kids get their extra sugar. Works in Mexico, there’s no reason why it can’t work here.

    PJM1974
    Member

    Oh I can well understand why sin taxes are designed to work – it’s a punitive tax designed to discourage people from buying a product that’s health or environmental risk.

    In practice however, you can end up with the perverse situation whereby a government likes the sin tax so much, that it doesn’t actually want to do anything too drastic to prevent the damage caused in the first instance. In this case, it might be better to legislate to limit the sugar content per can/bottle.

    It’s why cigarettes cost nearly a tenner a pack, but smoking isn’t banned. It’s also why there’s Fuel Duty, but the government is doing all it can to stifle demand for public transport and to ensure that gas-guzzling cars remain aspirational for people who aren’t going to notice chucking £150 of fuel into their tank.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    Wanna try saying that in Byker? or would you rather demonise the poor from a distance?

    Funny when I’ve spoken to friends from Byker they’ve laughed at it.

    If you’ve ever lived with a newly diagnosed Type One then you will know the drill off

    I’m very lucky that I haven’t but I’ve treat 100’s of them over the years with glucagon, glucose IV, hyposto, just food or a drink and various combinations. I still think it’s far from a tax on diabetics.

    From a purely selfish point of view this sucks balls. The only time I drink full fat coke is on long road rides, preferably on a hot day. Now I am going to have to pay tax on what is in my opinion one of life’s little pleasures, a cold crisp coke on a sunny day. 🙁

    If I show the HMRC my Strava results for the financial year and receipts for any cokes purchased do I get a TAX rebate.?

    PJM1974
    Member

    I’m very lucky that I haven’t but I’ve treat 100’s of them over the years with glucagon, glucose IV, hyposto, just food or a drink and various combinations.

    You’re a medical professional? Good, you guys have been frankly awesome. You know enough to understand that you cannot treat all hypos with a simple tube of glucogel – dosage is very important, otherwise you end up with blood glucose yo-yoing all over the shop.

    I still think it’s far from a tax on diabetics

    Fair enough, I’m coming at it from two angles:

    1) Diabetics will pay extra for something to treat a medical condition. I view it in a similar way to the way I view a tax on tampons. Women don’t have to use tampons, which is why they’re taxed as a luxury. As a bloke with a lot of female pals, I’m dead against VAT on gender. I suppose that’s my angle.

    But vive la difference.

    2) The publicity hasn’t been positive PR for people with Type 1 diabetes, as several conversations I’ve had with people who confuse Type 1 with Type 2 will attest. That’s my biggest beef by far.

    Funny when I’ve spoken to friends from Byker they’ve laughed at it.

    probably not a universal reaction though, is it?

    jimjam
    Member

    No doubt it all goes into one big pot but I think the tax would be easier to digest (no pun intended) if revenue generated went directly to preventing obesity or promoting sport.

    Klunk
    Member

    [video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BnUOfWRghc[/video]

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    You’re a medical professional? Good, you guys have been frankly awesome. You know enough to understand that you cannot treat all hypos with a simple tube of glucogel – dosage is very important, otherwise you end up with blood glucose yo-yoing all over the shop.

    Thanks. Yeah a bit of a balance as is with any sugar.

    probably not a universal reaction though, is it?

    Well that’s sums up jokes. They’re very well known through out the NE as Byker dummies not sure why you think it’s about the poor.

    Well that’s sums up jokes. They’re very well known through out the NE as Byker dummies not sure why you think it’s about the poor.

    Fair enough, on reflection this is much like your other jokes or views, I should have remembered

Viewing 38 posts - 81 through 118 (of 118 total)

The topic ‘Tax on sugary drinks’ is closed to new replies.