Talk to me about running

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  • Talk to me about running
  • Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Against my better judgment I seem to have been roped in for running the Manchester 10k. It was early in the morning. I wasn’t fully awake.

    This now presents me with the issue of using my lower limbs for something other than cycling. Something they haven’t experienced for quite some time. In fact the last time I broke into anything more than a light canter was on cross country runs at school (circa 1947). And this was mainly an excuse to have a crafty fag.

    I do quite a bit of riding… I commute every day… so i do have a reasonable* level of fitness

    So…. give me some pointers please. I’m going to have to do some training I suppose. Or I may die.

    *the word ‘reasonable’ is used figuratively, and only in direct comparison with the morbidly obese and 60 year old arthritics.

    WackoAK
    Member

    Get a decent pair of running shoes – go to a running shop and get assessed to see what type of running shoe you need. Expect to pay c£60

    Jamie
    Member

    Get some decent running shows. If possible go to a shop that does gait analysis to find out if you pronate or over pronate etc. I thought it was not worth it and started running, or at least trying to, in some old nikes and my ankles would start to ache. Went to a proper shop to get tested and advised on which shoes to use. No problems since.

    MrSparkle
    Member

    binners – there’s two lads here at work who have signed up to do it. Neither of ’em are runners. I’ve done a bit (mostly fell running but I have lurched around the odd 10K over the years. So, my advice is steady away. Gradually build up to the distance. You have bike fitness so your cardiovascular should be fine it’s just getting the legs used to it. Start off with a circuit of 2 miles, run it at whatever pace you can manage. STRETCH after as you WILL have sore legs. Two or three days later try it again. over the next few weeks build it up by, say, a mile or half a mile at a time. Don’t run more than 3 times a week. You’ve got til May, iirc so on that sort of program you should be ok. I am presuming you are after ‘survival’ rather than winning it? ;0)

    llama
    Member

    Similar position here. My advice based on recent experience is to take it VERY VERY VERY easy to start with. So easy you think you are not doing anything. For example, alternating between running and walking and not for too long.

    I did not do this and I’ve been limping around with a sore knee for a week. And I thought I was taking it easy, this was after just a 20 minute run. Yes I’ve had shoes properly fitted and all that. The trouble is I’m OK fitness wise from cycling, well Ok enough to run for 20 minutes without a raising the heart rate too much, but my legs are just not right for running.

    Jamie
    Member

    double post. 😐

    Premier Icon Bushwacked
    Subscriber

    There was a really good article about cyclists running in a Cycling Plus supplement recently.

    It basically said that one things Cyclists have a problem with is that they are used to riding for hours but when running they think they can do the same time – but they can’t.

    Apparently the impact of running can really affect cyclists – it is culmulative so they say start off running short distances and very gradually build up over time. Start off doing 15-20 mins max – more regular runs of shorter distance are better than fewer runs over longer distance.

    I might be able to find the article and scan it in if you want – let me know.

    MrGrim
    Member

    As the above advice. I was in a similar position last year. I had bike fitness but when I started running, I could barely make it to the end of the road. Build it up gradually with decent shoes. Make sure you have 1-2 days rest/alternative exercise in between runs.

    There’s a good starting training plan here:

    10k PDF Plan

    aleigh
    Member

    Agree regarding the trainers – I did that test on the running machine and have been fitted with a decent pair. Normal running trainers are pointless as they will damage your feet etc in the long run.

    To get me started with 5k I used Bupa’s site. They have a great running programme and when you’ve achieved that you can train up for the 10k.

    It really is very easy if you do it slowly and once you’ve conquered 10k you can’t pretty much add the miles on quickly.

    Premier Icon binners
    Subscriber

    Thanks very much indeed guys! Some words of wisdom here indeed. I’ve got plenty of time to build up so I’ll certainly be starting slow

    Premier Icon RichT
    Subscriber

    Start slow, short and regular as your legs will need to catch up with you heart and lungs which should be in good shape. 10k isn’t very far, so no need to build up to great distances.

    And get some decent shoes that suit you sir. Gait analysis is really worthwhile and while £70-80 seems a lot for a pair of running shoes, it is a very cheap sport compared to cycling.

    As poeple above have suggested, take your time. Running places a lot of stress on the joints, works out your upper body too and your heart rate will be higher than cycling.

    The best thing to do is start now. You have in the region of 16 weeks. Aim for 2 jogs a week for 2 weeks, around 2 miles each. Start gently and finish gently, spend ten minutes stretching after each. Weeks 3-4 do the same but 3 times per week.

    IF YOU FEEL SORE THEN DON’T GO OUT, WAIT ANOTHER COUPLE OF DAYS TO PROPERLY RECOVER.

    Weeks 5-8 think about increasing the distance a bit, from between 2 and 4 miles. Same sort of pace.

    Weeks 9-12 try one of the jogs at a faster pace so you’re pretty knackered at the end. Finish this with a 5 min light jog then stretching.

    Weeks 13-15, still on 3 times per week. Make one run a light 3-4 mile jog, one run a 4 mile fast (OR 4 miles mixed pace, working hard up the hills, between lampposts etc with slower pace sections to recover) and one run a 6 mile easy-steady pace run.

    LAST WEEK BEFORE RACE – just jog a couple of times lightly, 4 miles or less. This slow-down helps the muscles repair any damage, and also mentally gets you anxious to run again, which you’ll feel on the start line (as well as the nerves that make you want to puke!).

    roper
    Member

    Don’t stretch for ten minutes!!!
    If you need to stretch, do a little but just warm down. Don’t finish on a sprint and stop moving, go to a jog , light jog or walk for about ten minutes.

    Try and vary your routes so you don’t get bored and try not to worry about running plans too much. If they suit you follow them, if they get on your t*ts just try and get a rough idea how far you are going but listen to your body. Build up slowly and try to vary the terrain a little.

    Running can be a lot of fun and will improve your biking. It can be good way to find new routes too.

    surfer
    Member

    Stretching is best done post run not before. Instead of stretching beforehand start your training runs very gently.

    Don’t stretch for ten minutes!!!

    Why do you say this? A good series of stretches probably consists of around 6 different stretches, done on each side of the body seperately, so that’s 12 stretches in ten minutes. Say 20 seconds per stretch and a few seconds to reposition, resulting in around 5-6 mins of actual stretches, and a couple of minutes preparation and repetition stretching of any areas that feel particularly tight. Ten minutes isn’t REALLY enough time to stretch properly.

    I combined stretching with a bit of a shake-down and muscle-rubbing. Runners are notoriously bad at keeping limber. And I get my ideas from experience, not magazines.

    aleigh
    Member

    I never stretch!

    surfer
    Member

    Dave Bedford didnt stretch at all I understand and held the world record for 10,000m. Coe stretched a lot and claimed it gave hime 1/2 inch per lap. Which makes up 1 inch over his prefered distance. He also ran 1:41 for 800m!

    Stretching isnt an olympic event but I think it does have benefits.

    roper
    Member

    mysterymurdoch, I did say if you need to stretch. Do you feel tight in the same places every time you run?

    Running mixed routes and mixed terrain will stretch your legs, hips, back and shoulders. If you stop running and stretch further, you are likely to over stretch something. Warming down will stop the muscles tightening up and ligaments from shrinking. If you want to get really into it a cold bath afterwards will be perfect, though I doubt it for a 10k.

    My advice is from a distant running perspective. As the OP has not run for a long time, 10k will be like a distant run rather than a sprint to him.

    If he does overstretch it could take quite some time to recover properly, it’s best to just take it easy and steady, enjoy it and don’t over-do it. Distance and strength will naturally build up.

    In 8 years of racing 800m-10k the times where I didn’t stretch saw me get injured and feel very tight. It was absolutely essential to me, and I’d highly recommend it to anybody getitng into it.

    gnarlynath
    Member

    I’ve ridden bikes since birth but got sucked into the old 10k running lark 4 years ago having never run a meter in my life. It was painful so I started the odd bit of training to ensure next time it wouldn’t hurt so much. And my running started to improve and the pain lessened.
    Last Saturday I ran my first Ultra marathon. 50 miles hurts alot! I need to train more. And so it goes on.
    Cycling is faster.

    GavinT
    Member

    Yep, as already said start of slow and steady. I probably run more than I cycle these days but when I started out running (maybe 5 years ago) I completely killed myself on the first few attempts. Your cycling fitness is not your friend here as it’ll allow you to go much harder than you should at the start. Feels ok at the time but you’ll be limping for days.

    Start out with a 10 – 15 minute run. If you feel ok the next day then up it a bit. Once you can handle 30 minutes you should be able to survive a 10k alright. Even at a very gentle job it shouldn’t take more than an hour.

    roper
    Member

    mysterymurdoch, That advice might be helpful for short distant running. Not everyone is the same though and stretching can cause problems and injury.

    gnarlynath, Which Ulra did you run?

    Not stretching can cause greater problems. I can’t understand the logic of arguing against it. It is difficult to overstretch…you obviously shouldn’t stretch to the point of pain; keep within this and you really can’t go wrong.

    Don’t stretch and you risk tightness which puts your gait out of balance. Dozens of injuries can arise following this.

    willard
    Member

    Did the same thing as you, but with the less well know Cambourne 10k.

    The best thing you can do is get a good pair of shoes that match your gait, and stretch. After that it’s just a case of starting with small distances and then working up to your target distance.

    The schedule I have (run is on April 5th) sets me an “agressive” three runs a week. I have not stuck to it, but I am increasing my distances weekly, so I reckon I’ll be ok by April.

    These days I do lots of running and not much biking. As per all the OPs the problem you may have is that your fitness will allow you to run quite a long way quite fast, but then you may not be able to walk for a few days after. If you don’t want to spend a lot of time building up your distances I would suggest going out and doing a 10 km run (not that much really) but taking it very steady. If you find that you are OK the day after then do it again the next week a bit quicker. If you find that your legs are bu&&ered after, then get a massage or just do a bit of light riding until they feel better (a few days). You’ll probably find that after you’ve gone through the pain and stiffness cycle a few times you’ll be OK.

    BTW I’m not a doctor, nor have I read any of this in a book – it’s just what works for me – proceed at your own risk.

    BTW again, although my overall cycling fitness is not what it once was, I have found that running has dramatically increased my leg strength and I can now ride short hard sections that I couldn’t have ridden when I cycled a lot and hardly ran at all.

    aleigh
    Member

    Don’t stretch and you risk tightness

    never had that problem but then i never overdo my running. i run to my ability and it works well for me 🙂

    roper
    Member

    I very rarely stretch and don’t suffer at all, as long as there is a warm down which is also better for the whole body, not just the legs.

    mysterymurdoch, yours is one opinion or philosophy towards running. There are several and they can depend on the types of running as well as types of bodies. Out of nosiness, do you stretch after riding too?

    colnagokid
    Member

    As everyone says good shoes. Good socks as well- I always use the double layered ones.
    Run on soft surfaces-grass/sand if you can.
    Stretching? Never did it when I was a youngster, but now light stretch/warm up before starting out, and stretch every day (dont injure yourself!), run every 3rd day

    Smee
    Member

    Don’t sprint out the door.

    i started jogging a while back. Found i went wwaayy to fast for the first 10 minutes, and after 25 minutes i was knackered.

    After a while i realised the trick is to go very very very slowly for 20 minutes, just above walking speed, and then it was much easier to jog for 40 – 60 minutes.

    Premier Icon Bushwacked
    Subscriber

    The damage done via the impact is cumulative during a run – so be careful when you are going from mainly cycling to running lots – like me you may end up with leg problems due to tendons not being prepared for 30minute epic runs!!

    I tried to do too much too soon and increase length of runs too quickly which has led to numerous problems. I wish someone had told me earlier.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I think it’s got something to do with your tendons. I don’t think they have as much elasticity if you’re used to cycling, but some of your muscles will be quite strong so you can easily knacker the tendons or at least make them very sore. From my rock climbing days it apparently takes a long longer to train your tendons than it does muscles, so you can strain them badly if you overdo it.

    gnarlynath
    Member

    roper – I ran the Thames Path Ultra. Good day out; weather was good, senery great, lovely and flat mostly off road trail. Worth a stab as a first. I’ll be doing it again. Got to improve on 8hrs 42min.
    I’m walking today but I remember my first 10k, I couldn’t walk for a week.

    surfer
    Member

    It would be my advice to start slowly and dispense with a pre run stretch but each to their own and its best to test what works as long as your choice doesnt injure you etc.
    In terms of a full stretching routine (and runners are often very poor at stretching and injury prevention!) I would recommend it is done quite soon after finishing the run.
    a good tip is to run on soft surfaces as much as possible. Over the years I have had many injuries due to running on hard surfaces, even stress fractures which can sideline you for some time. Its not critical if mileage is low and during the dark nights its difficult however even if you just make your weekend runs around a golf course/playing fields etc it helps.

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