Talk to me about chainsaws

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  • Talk to me about chainsaws
  • Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    While I fully see the need for massive H&S awareness. 800 poonds makes it not so cost effective just for garden taming and wood stocking.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    if it’s just for one set of tree trimming then would be safer, easier and cheaper to just get someone in to lop it off and cut it to length?

    ski
    Member

    STIHL MS171 will do what you want, I have used one to take down a 60 footer in the past!

    But its worth seeking good training and getting your safty gear sorted too, before you get your first kickback 😉

    Gotama
    Member

    Hire one for a weekend from HSS. Fell tree, enjoy doing manly work and return to shop.

    Depending on how many trees you have it won’t take very long at all to whip through and log something 1ft diameter and prob not cost eff to buy.

    29erKeith
    Member

    not preaching at all as some but …
    be sensible with one, safety gear can be had from BandQ, always remember the brake, I had a little lesson from a mate who’s a tree surgeon. I personally wouldn’t do anything at height myself just a bit of log cutting on the ground

    I bought myself a cheapo £99 one from BandQ (Homelite?) and it’s been fine for the amount of times I use and what I use it for it’s fine. it’s all ce safe etc

    beware ebay cheapness as it might not be safe…dodgy import
    most on here will say Husqvarna or Stihl I’d guess but is a bit spendy for an occasional user

    wood should be season for 2+ years really btw

    theendisnigh
    Member

    I bought a cheap chainsaw for about £55 if I remember from ebay. Its a cheap chinese thing but does the job really well. I have a full log shed thanks to it.

    It was a german company selling loads of them by auction. orange and under various brand names that i don’t recall.

    highlandman
    Member

    +1 for Husqvarna. Mine is now 32 years old (!) and still going very strong, gets serviced occasionally but only does maybe a dozen hours a year now, much more when it & I were younger.
    A small semi-pro model, big engine/small bar, would probably cost about £400 nowadays. Lessons are vital, as is safety gear. Artificial feet are not cheap and would require you to learn a whole new pedalling technique.
    Personally, I usually drop small trees with the bow saw, having started the cuts with the Husky.

    beefheart
    Member

    You will only make a mistake once using a chainsaw as they take no prisoners.
    Felling trees is a different kettle of fish to cutting up logs on the ground.
    Ideally get some kind of tuition, or at the very least read up and watch some instructional youtube videos.

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    Exactly as beefheart says.

    Mrs FD will not let me have one. She is constantly trying to put peoples arms and legs back on after chainsaw accidents. Pro’s and amateurs.

    Pay some one to do it.

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    So i have an open fire, some too tall and unweildy trees and a mostly empty log shed. Probably going to get some logs in this year as anything I fell now won’t weather until spring. But I should still crack on with it. So I want a chainsaw, as while I have a bow saw, there’s a time/energy/effort/enthusiasm factor to be considered.

    So I want a chainsaw, something smallish, cut things of 1ft diameter at the most. But usually a bit less. What should i look for, what should I avoid. Its not going to get constant weeekly use, prob more occasional intense sawing sessions. Any recomendations. What are the otptions? do chainsaws come in different types. (I honestly know nothing) What am I looking at in money terms to fill my “I want to turn that tree into logs easily and quick[ish]ly” needs?

    Cheers

    Unk

    EDIT : BALLS, sorry, someone please report/mod move it to the right forum please… 😳

    Nicknoxx
    Member

    Where are you? I might be able to help in exchange for some wood.

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    Thanks for the replies. I am very concious of the safety factor, steel toed boots are on the list anyway as I need some for other stuff. Looking into occasional use courses in the area.

    Taking on board comments I’m thinking I can stick with bow saw for felling, and get a cheapo small one for logging. Electric vs. petrol. Less raw pure in electric I’m guessing. Worth bothering with?

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    Am in Nidderdale Nicknoxx

    TooTall
    Member

    My brother is a tree surgeon (Tynemouth Tree Surgeons if anyone in the NE needs a good one) and pays an awful lot of money for training, protective equipment and astranomical insurance premiums. Seeing him working at height is a very impressive thing and not something I’d advise anyone to do untrained.

    BTW – steel toed boots aren’t enough. Tree boots have protective shanks and tongues / spats as well.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    Thanks for the replies. I am very concious of the safety factor, steel toed boots are on the list anyway as I need some for other stuff. Looking into occasional use courses in the area.

    Taking on board comments I’m thinking I can stick with bow saw for felling, and get a cheapo small one for logging. Electric vs. petrol. Less raw pure in electric I’m guessing. Worth bothering with?

    If you think you can get away with just some steel toed boots, please at least talk to someone who knows what they are doing and get them to recommend specific boots/chaps/jacket/gloves/helmet for the power/speed of saw you get. To buy a full set of safety clothing (even if you shop around for deals) is going to cost you more than the even a modest quality saw.

    I’ve got an electric Husqvarna 321 just for logging up and not pee’ing off the neighbours too much first thing on a sunday morning and it is a glorious thing to use compared to a petrol one in this environment – light weight, quiet(ish) and enough power for a full 16″ cut.

    damion
    Member

    Hello,

    Was a tree surgeon for 8 years before letting my body tell me its had enough and now being behind a desk. 🙁

    Please dont make me post the pictures of the slip I had with a chainsaw (think they’re on here somewhere, may be pre hack actually).

    Get some training and at the very least some chainsaw wellies if all your doing is loggin on the floor. Proper trousers and wellies if you’re using a saw horse. I had a friend used to say he was fine in steelies, he can now only count to 9 on his toes and wont pick a saw up for love nor money.

    Training should cover maintenance and sharpening as well as use, a blunt saw is one of the biggest hazards.

    As for which saw? Makita’s easy start system is really rather good, if not then a small stihl. Just depends on what your exact needs are.

    Damion.

    Premier Icon kilo
    Subscriber

    +1 for Stihl petrol, mine gets used every three or four months or so for a burst of cutting, never had a problem with it

    stufive
    Member

    stihl or husky..dont bother with any catalouge crap 🙂

    Premier Icon unklehomered
    Subscriber

    To buy a full set of safety clothing (even if you shop around for deals) is going to cost you more than the even a modest quality saw.

    Just came back after an internet tour of safety gear that told me exactly that. In my head it was boots (steal toed was me supposing I could find a pair of boots that would do trailbuilding/be ok for CS – seem unlikely after a bit of research) and gloves… Chaps etc evoked a first reaction “no that’s surely not… well I do LIKE my legs now I think about it”.

    Am still interested but current plan makes not worth the money for now (prob won’t be in this garden for too much longer… (few years most)

    Notice HSS provide safety gear and instruction w/ each hire, will keep an eye out for courses in the area, in an AONB so they do that sort of thing quiite often. Bow saw, axe and achey armes for a bit longer then I think… boooring. 😕

    bikebouy
    Member

    MrsBouy does chainsaw wood sculpture in her spare time and uses a Husky 339. It’s robust and more than enough for your requirements.

    Shes spent an awful lot of time having wood chippings thrown up at her face and she will attest to:

    TRAINING.

    mattsccm
    Member

    Good quality lasts. Learn how to sharpen stuff.

    continuity
    Member

    I would get a small petrol stihl. Be warned, big heavy chainsaws can be a real bitch to lug around.

    timbur
    Member

    Stihl MS171-181 are ideal but not without safety gear and training.
    Kickback is exciting in a nervous way :Oo
    Oh, hold the saw to your right hand side so if it does kick it goes over your shoulder and not into you head. Being a biker it took me a few hours of use not to centralise it all the time.
    Got my tickets and never looked back. Bigger saw coming soon for the winter.
    Tim

    Nicknoxx
    Member

    Too far for me, sorry.

    timber
    Member

    If it is within your ability.
    Just hire for a one off job, HSS as mentioned, hire with safety kit. Some of the guys that use our site for training get their stuff from there.
    If you really want to buy, go for something that you can get parts for – Stihl 171 is popular with fencing contractors as a cheap tool that does the job.

    Failing that I have a mate in Ripon area who probably could, or know a tree surgeon Knaresborough area.

    organic355
    Member

    Ive just ordered a HUSKY 440e with an 18″ bar, as the recent fallen tree is too far away for my Hushy 321El electric saw (cable), and I am killing myself with the handsaws.

    Looking forward to this beasts arrival

    If you are hauling logs any distance I can also recommend one of these, which i just got second hand off ebay:

    crotchrocket
    Member

    re renting: my local hire & buy don’t rent c/saws anymore due to the h&s risk. So when I wanted to remove some (large) ‘hedging’ I bought an electric saw which I can then (well, now actually) resell on ebay.

    Buy & resell: more cost effective than renting, plus I had it for longer so i didn’t feel i needed to rush the job over a weekend.

    re Electric: I found 1900w to be more than enough for logs around the 10inch diam. kind of size.

    re: chains: new ones for my saw are itro £15 if you don’t like resharpening (about every 15hrs of use before it’s noticably blunter) ime.

    elzorillo
    Member

    I got one for £50 from Netto.. lasted three years of heavy use.. well worth the money.

    It’s now stopped working but was so cheap that it was easier to just buy another cheap one from Argos.

    Taff
    Member

    Don’t know much about chainsaws personally but my old man worked in the woods for a decade. He always had 2 Stihl saws, one of which now belongs to my uncle and is still going some 30 years later. He would only ever use Stihl but spoke highly of Husky too.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    re: chains: new ones for my saw are itro £15 if you don’t like resharpening (about every 15hrs of use before it’s noticably blunter) ime.

    Are you advocating throwing away a chain everytime its blunt….. rather than investing in a £10 sharpening kit? 😯

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    😯

    I get Archer chains from ebay for about a fiver each.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/Power-Tools-Equipment-/29518/i.html?_ipg=&_from=&_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ssn=blindstickinsect

    A quick sharpen before each outing and they last just as long as branded ones IMO. Although Im ready to believe Stihl ones might be a bit more durable on harder woods than I have to deal with.

    That eBay seller is also good VFM for 2-stroke and lube oil too if you’re not buying 50 litre drums from a wholesaler.

    crotchrocket
    Member

    Perhaps not ‘throwing away’, just swapping out – if you CBA to sharpen it in the middle of a job.

    bristolbiker
    Member

    Perhaps not ‘throwing away’, just swapping out – if you CBA to sharpen it in the middle of a job.

    You should be able to do a ‘good enough’ sharpen to carry on on-site in a couple of mins….. or as long as it takes to change the chain. Alternatively get one of those power sharpener things and do it in 30 secs….. or just plan your cutting so all the ground cuts, where the soild/dirt will dull the teeth in seconds, are done last. If your just logging up on a horse the chain should stay sharp for ages and ages.

    Also, hand sharpening is a good excuse to check the bar/rest of the saw over at the same time….

    elzorillo
    Member

    I tried sharpening the chains a few times.. I was useless at it. So embarassingly, I just use them till I’m literally having to burn my way through the wood then I replace it.

    Premier Icon Stoner
    Subscriber

    did you use the stihl file & guide? very cheap, idiot proof bit of kit.
    new files are only 80p in my local shop.

    sharkbait
    Member

    As I’m hoping to be feeding two stoves this winter and have a pretty good source of cordwood I’m very tempted to get one of these so I don’t have to use the chainsaw as much:
    [video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=5D2AdzClLa4#t=4s[/video]
    Safer and faster.

    Premier Icon granny_ring
    Subscriber

    Does it come with a free tractor?

    Premier Icon SaxonRider
    Subscriber

    I completely and utterly understand the warnings on here regarding chainsaw use and have not actually used one myself. BUT…

    I grew up around a dad and two uncles who used chainsaws regularly. Not one of them was professional, and not one of them ever took a course. The only safety equipment I ever saw used was a pair of safety goggles.

    My (serious) question is, then: Are the safety-mongers on here being too emphatic?

    I mean, there are lots of things we could kill ourselves with if we had an accident, but that we still use.

    bikebouy
    Member

    Aspen, use aspen.

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