Taking the most clear photos possible.

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  • Taking the most clear photos possible.
  • TuckerUK
    Member

    It would have to be a good scanner to replicate the quality of a decent DSLR.

    OMG, that’s your drawing samuri? Wow. My dad was good an art but I don’t have an arty bone in my body, so I’m always in awe of those that are arty.

    samuri
    Member

    Why not just make the original photograph black and white and use an ‘art filter’ in photoshop to make it look like a pencil drawing?

    That’s what I do.

    Depending on what you use for RAW conversion, you may be able to correct for some lens distortion using library settings. I use Camera Raw within Photoshop CS6, along with a lens profile via Adobe Lens Profile Downloader to correct for a good amount of distortion, vignetting and chromatic aberrations.

    I was also a fan of leaving the shutter open for ages to compensate for poor light, but was frustrated by noise. Someone told me it was the long exposure and heat effects. After I bought more light, shooting at the same ISO rating, for less time, things got less noisy.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    There may be a setting to compensate for thermal noise on long exposures – there is on mine. After the exposure it does another with the mirror down. With a completely black frame it can tell which pixels are hot and subtract them from the original image.

    CountZero
    Member

    @organic355;

    MrSmith, I’m sure you’d getter greater satisfaction trolling vulnerable people on Twitter, rather than taking the piss out of people on here, who are genuinely creative. 🙄

    MrSmith
    Member

    I was also a fan of leaving the shutter open for ages to compensate for poor light, but was frustrated by noise. Someone told me it was the long exposure and heat effects. After I bought more light, shooting at the same ISO rating, for less time, things got less noisy.

    Depending on the camera you can turn long exposure noise reduction on/off. Sometimes this involves a ‘dark frame’ that the camera takes to equalise the noise.

Viewing 6 posts - 41 through 46 (of 46 total)

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