Straight pull or J pull?

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  • Straight pull or J pull?
  • Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    Whats the real world difference other than time spent if replacing spokes?

    ndthornton
    Member

    Dont know what you mean by time saving?

    Only difference I found is its harder to build/true your wheel as the spokes tend to just spin. Also a more complicated – machined hub is required rather than just a simple flanged affair. I have a set but wouldn’t bother again.

    Premier Icon Kryton57
    Subscriber

    A set of what ND thornton? You’re suggesting SP is more tricky? I’ve heard J pull can be more subject to breakage due to tolerances of the “J” and the hole in the hub – ie they move/are weak?

    Premier Icon rickon
    Subscriber

    I’ve not had a spoke break at the knuckle, I’ve had SP and normal spokes go.

    I reckon SP suits road better (it’s nice and clean for radial or half radial wheels) and J for MTB. SP for marginal gains, J for ease of inevitable repair.

    ndthornton
    Member

    A set of straight pull – Yes I suppose they have been very good wheels once built – haven’t snapped a single spoke.

    But they did take a lot longer to build into a wheel as tightening the nipple just resulted in spinning the spoke once tension was introduced – I ended up having to use mole grips to keep the spoke from spinning – and this made marks.

    A J-spoke cant spin like this although is does build up tension instead – so you need to stress relieve but that’s easy.

    Perhaps there is a special tool you can get for gripping the straight spokes – or perhaps it was because I was reusing spokes which had previously been thread locked (forgot about that)

    For me though a flanged and drilled hub (J spoke) is a simpler design than a machined hub (straight pull)…..and my experience of simpler normally means stronger, cheaper, lighter etc.

    Only difference I found is its harder to build/true your wheel as the spokes tend to just spin. Also a more complicated – machined hub is required rather than just a simple flanged affair. I have a set but wouldn’t bother again.

    +1

    For some reason the rim I was building (Stan’s) over-tensioned incredibly easily too. I too wouldn’t bother again. Spokes can be a pig to replace too, depending where they sit on the hub (the getting the nipple past other spokes to the spoke seat can be incredibly fiddley).

    Straight pull offers nothing over regular elbowed spokes IMO, and are trickier to build (spinning).

    Hubs to suit straight pull are weaker, more complex, and often more expensive.

    Elbowed spokes every time.

    I’ve heard J pull can be more subject to breakage due to tolerances of the “J”

    Broken spokes are usually a sign of a crap wheel build with low tensions. Or a damaged wheel that has not been repaired.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    The main difference is that j spokes are easy to find and buy, straight pulls aren’t. I’ve saddled myself with 2 sets of straight pull wheels and it is a total pain in the arse, never ever again.

    juan
    Member

    Sp spoke can take more tension for the same model.
    Although you need to hold the spoke while building the wheel.
    J bend spokes are hold both side of the spokes, as SP tend to move a bit when the rim compresses

    khani
    Member

    Had both SP and JB Crest 29 on pro 2 evo and the SP’s feel a bit stiffer, no problems with either..

    Sp spoke can take more tension for the same model.

    I call complete and utter shenanigans.

    The thread is the weakest load bearing point on a spoke.

    I had a jpull snap at the elbow about a month ago, those wheels have been on various bikes for 13 years now. Fixed it that day with an easy to buy spare. Straight pull seems a solution for a problem that just doesn’t exist.

    cynic-al
    Member

    Kryton57 – Member
    I’ve heard J pull can be more subject to breakage due to tolerances of the “J” and the hole in the hub – ie they move/are weak?

    Been doing it that way for decades – SP has not been found to be significantly better.

    joolsburger – Member Straight pull seems a solution for a problem that just doesn’t exist.

    ^ that – looks different/fancier, put a price premium on it and market it as “better”. plenty will buy it.

    messiah
    Member

    If the straight-pull was the norm and someone came up with a circular flange design that allows spokes with a J-bend at one end to be placed further out from the hub centre (hence building a stronger wheel) and doing away with those week and difficult to machine spoke holding turrets they would be onto a winning design…

    patriotpro
    Member

    I’ve had a set of J-spoked wheels and have a set of SP right now.

    Snapped multiple spokes on the first set and none on my current set (SP).

    trail_rat
    Member

    My thats a super insight patriotpro. Almost worthy of the cool story bro meme… But i cant be arsed.

    Premier Icon shortcut
    Subscriber

    J Bend is my prefered option. Easier to re-build or repair as spares are easier to source.

    J Bend spokes break for the same reasons any spoke breaks. It was cheap, it was over tensioned, it was old and tired, it was poorly built or has been abused in some other way.

    cynic-al
    Member

    back to statistics class, patriotpro!

    Premier Icon njee20
    Subscriber

    J-bend FTW, straight pull are a total bugger to find in shops.

    patriotpro
    Member

    I know it proves jack-shit but it’s my experiences, now stop picking on me OK… 😆

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