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  • Storing firewood in a stone building with limited airflow. Fungus worries.
  • mcmoonter
    Free Member

    In a bid to save building and stacking a new wood shed, last year I cleared a space in an outbuilding and filled it with wood. It was a mixture of wood from the sawmill and some fallen timber from our own ground.

    Most of it was fairly dry before I stored it, but a furry fungus appeared on some of the Beech logs that were in the mix. My first thought was that it was some sort of rot and worried about it spreading not just to the other wood but the building.

    The space was full, but I have since decanted the majority of the effected wood into a new shed. Will the air circulation be sufficient to prevent the further spread of this fungus?

    elzorillo
    Free Member

    Do you live in a castle?

    midlifecrashes
    Full Member

    I thought you said last time was the last woodpile porn thread?

    Stoner
    Free Member

    not sure you’re going to get much of a through draft in there.

    Bit of a fag now, but perhaps lining it with upright pallets might allow circulating air?

    As it happens just rejigging my store now as I want to build a pellet tank instead of storing bags of pellets on pallets. Going to store my logs stacked against the yard wall outside with a little pitched catslide over it.

    RustyMac
    Full Member

    Your just showing off now 😉

    That looks like a fantastig garage you have stuffed some wood in there. Could you not move the tractor into there and the wood into the massive woodstore you built?

    slowoldgit
    Free Member

    I read somewhere that living timber may have latent fungus, maybe more than one in it which shows after it’s been cut. Beech does seem to be prone to it.

    I wouldn’t worry other than keeping the outbuilding ventilated on dry days.

    Cougar
    Full Member

    I think I see your problem.

    You’ve filled your beer cellar with wood.

    sharkbait
    Free Member

    I keep logs in part of a single storey stable block – the bit I’m using is about 9′ wide but there’s no ceiling, it’s open to the roof. There’s not much direct sun or draft.
    So far the wood has been fine with little fungus, but generally it’s been put in fairly dry.
    I’m chopping wood now for next winter and would prefer to dry it covered outside for a few months before putting it into the stable.
    I think that you’re remaining wood will be fine as long as the store is rain proof – but if water can get in then rot will quickly follow.

    bedmaker
    Full Member

    I’d be inclined to do as stones says and line with pallets( or similar) to give air flow al round

    woody2000
    Full Member

    I really want to know where the hell you live McMoonter – are you landed gentry or just the caretaker? 🙂

    s
    Free Member

    mcmoonter – I take it that’s the only entrance which allows access for air flow?

    Stoners idea might help, add some pallets to the floor too if you can, big job mind & even then it still might not give you the air flow you need?

    I had to restack one of my log stores at the weekend as the floor had giving way! Took 4 hours & guessing is about a 10th of your stack above! 😉

    mcmoonter
    Free Member

    I really want to know where the hell you live McMoonter – are you landed gentry or just the caretaker?

    Neither. Here’s my mother just before I was born. I’m from a family of bohemian artist hippies. Moonter Towers has been in the family for nearly 35 years. 20 of which have been without central heating.

    Back to the OP.

    Thanks for the info on the Beech. the sapce its stored in is dry, and it has three doorways. I will pull the wood forward to get some air to the rear. The entrance is within a yard which is sheltered from the wind, so airflow as such is limited.

    ART
    Full Member

    No answer on the fungus front but kinda disappointed at the ‘chuck it in effect’ going on there, given your other rather more ordered and beautiful creations. 😉 Am also thinking though that re-stacking and airflow is probably in order.

    I really want to know where the hell you live McMoonter – are you landed gentry or just the caretaker?

    ahem, there’s already an orderly line for squatting rights at mcmoonter towers doncha know. 😀

    tang
    Free Member

    Another child of the revolution! We just visited our childhood home( in the woods, wood for cooking and heat).

    Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    Moonter Towers has been in the family for nearly 35 years. 20 of which have been without central heating.

    If you hadn’t taken your heating out 20 years ago you wouldn’t need all this bloody fire wood.

    peterfile
    Free Member

    you REALLY like wood moonter!

    Do you have any bikes?

    mcmoonter
    Free Member

    If you hadn’t taken your heating out 20 years ago you wouldn’t need all this bloody fire wood.

    I’m from a family of bohemian artist hippies

    When did you last hear a bohemian artist hippie use the word thermostat.

    I love the process of gathering and storing fuel over the year in preparation for winter. It’s a primal need.

    mcmoonter
    Free Member

    Could you not move the tractor into there and the wood into the massive woodstore you built?

    Keep up at the back 😉

    bruneep
    Full Member

    Its all getting a bit OCD now. Find another hobby apart from stacking wood. 😉

    Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    Yeah. Why not burn some of it? If just to free up some space for more. 😉

    hillsplease
    Full Member

    I have woodshed envy. Is it wrong?

    timber
    Full Member

    Most likely related to the moisture content, without the airflow you just have the beginnings of a compost heap. Beech is prone to fungus, but any it had whilst living, won’t be so interested once dead.

    As mentioned above, just need to open up some air space. Most of our log stores are on pallet floors with holes in walls / air boarded sides and big openings to the best weather side (out of rain, in sun). Big faff for a filled shed, so would just drag forward and pile into islands like an egg box to get the most air flow and use it up to start fresh with ventilation.

    matthewjb
    Free Member

    Can’t you scoop all the wood out with your tractor and then start again once you’ve put some pallets down?

    maccruiskeen
    Full Member

    Find another hobby apart from stacking wood.

    Before Enlightenment chop wood carry water, after Enlightenment, chop wood carry water.

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