Sportive, sportive, sportive, and new road cyclists

Home Forum Bike Forum Sportive, sportive, sportive, and new road cyclists

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 97 total)
  • Sportive, sportive, sportive, and new road cyclists
  • aa
    Member

    i’m pleased i’ve found out i’m slow. It’s humbling to lfinally know, but, at the same time liberating. Stw, i thank you.
    I should say, i’m not anti new cyclist. I know it’s exciting and all, but, i just don’t need to know every moment of path to cycling nirvana.

    Toasty
    Member

    Where’s the “my new bike” picture thread? Sounds ace

    My grass is far too long for that sort of thing, I’ll ride somewhere pretty and take a picture after the weekend (as I’m away).

    Premier Icon Sandwich
    Subscriber

    there will be peace in the middle east

    Now that’s just crazy talk.

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    Can someone print up some “I Liked Cycling Before It Was Cool” t-shirts?

    Here you go…

    http://velolove.cc/t-shirts/95-i-was-cycling-before-it-was-cool-t-shirt.html

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
    Subscriber

    Audax is the new Sportive anyway

    Speaking of which:

    Home

    Premier Icon ton
    Subscriber

    just look forward to the winter, when all the NEW bike riders have hung up their wheels for the winter.
    a time when the roads are wet/cold/slushy/icy/QUIET.
    a time for US proper bike riders…….or dont you ride through the winter…… 😉

    Edric 64
    Member

    Audax are great cheap as chips and you get a route on a bit of paper so the country doesnt get littered with arrows and pointless warning signs about junctions ahead (just incase you missed the red and white ones on posts put up by the council!)

    johnellison
    Member

    I smell troll.

    SkillWill
    Member

    Audax is the new Sportive anyway

    Speaking of which:
    http://www.londonedinburghlondon.com/

    I didn’t know you were doing that, you are a dark horse…

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    I like football

    Edric 64
    Member

    Who do you support?

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
    Subscriber

    I didn’t know you were doing that, you are a dark horse…

    Alternating between quietly confident, and bricking it. My first Audaux, so in at the deep end….

    Premier Icon tomhoward
    Subscriber

    Here you go…

    *ordered* 🙂

    Cheers

    Huddersfield Town fan

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Who do you support?

    The mighty Rams!

    Edric 64
    Member

    What you smell is someone who cant see the point of lining someones pocket with 25 quid to be spoonfed a route you could do on your own .Its the cost and the spoonfeeding /bum wiping nature of them I dont like.At least on an Audax you pay your 8 quid have to think to follow the route and if you break down they may have given you a taxi firm number!Either do Audax or enter a 4th cat race I dont get sportives especially the competitive sportive riders

    Edric 64
    Member

    Bristol Rovers .Hey so far we all look like real fans ,no glory hunters yet!

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    What you smell is someone who cant see the point of lining someones pocket with 25 quid to be spoonfed a route you could do on your own .Its the cost and the spoonfeeding /bum wiping nature of them I dont like.

    The one and only sportive I have done (£15) was a bit odd in that a lot of the riders had garmins/etc but I seemed to be the only one who had bothered to download the route to follow! 4 times I had to redirect nearby riders who had gone the wrong way due to insufficient/missing signage. I couldn’t believe how many bikes had squeaky brakes, noisy gears, etc – that would drive me mental over a 60 mile ride! The mid-way refuelling stop was very well done though, plenty of grub, drinks, etc! It was good to have a lot of riders to ride/chat with as well since I had turned up on my own. As others had said though it was difficult to find evenly managed groups and most groups I only rode with for a few miles at a time. That said I would do another but will not make it a particularly regular thing. I am intrigued by the French ones that Wiggle have been organising though, will definitely try to get on one of those next year I think as that’s something a bit different!

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    James wrote:

    It was good to have a lot of riders to ride/chat with as well since I had turned up on my own. As others had said though it was difficult to find evenly managed groups and most groups I only rode with for a few miles at a time.

    That’s one of the things I like about the Sportives I’ve done, chatting to lots of different folk on the way round. I suppose you never meet the “competitive” ones that way though 🙂

    Premier Icon cookeaa
    Subscriber

    Well just hope much history with road cycling do you need to have before you have accumulated some sort of credibility?

    I only really ride road bikes for commuting and with mates on the odd weekend and have done for about the last five years, I’ve ridden MTBs for the last ~25 years or so.

    I don’t do sportives or audax’ and I’m not in a road club, I’m basically just an MTBer who also owns and enjoys riding a road bike.

    I’m also deeply suspicious of “elites” based on nothing more than time served. But I’m quite sure I don’t get to be in the gang yet anyway, thank ****…

    Lately I’m seeing more roadies out and about, my only real judgement on any rider is weather or not they return a nod/smile or stare ahead in grim stoney silence, you get both sorts of behaviour from newbies and the “proper” roadies.

    Which just tells me there’s as much chance of someone who’s been riding 30 minutes being a prick or alright as there is someone who’s been at it 30 years…

    Yeah people at work are suddenly acquiring an interest in cycling and shock horror they want to talk to people who’ve been at it a bit longer and pick up whatever they can.
    What sort of git hog’s the knowledge and tries to discourage people from taking up something they enjoy themselves. I can think of nothing more miserable and antisocial.

    Premier Icon DavidB
    Subscriber

    I wrote a whole book of UK roadie rides in order to liberate cyclists from the sportive. I’ve never understood why you would set out to ride a classic route on a day that is shovelling down with rain, with a group of mamils and pay for a banana and some route signs. I like to pick my weather and company and get a time that is mine, worked for by my legs and not the man on the front.

    But many others do understand why, I guess they do it for the time and the feeling of being part of a “race”. However, no sportive is like any road race I’ve ever done. Strangely I see the re-introduction of groups of cyclists to the roads as a positive thing. It would be a worthy culture change if drivers accepted that Sunday’s the day they may encounter a group of fat blokes in tight clothes puffing away in front of them.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    cookeaa wrote:

    Well just hope much history with road cycling do you need to have before you have accumulated some sort of credibility?
    I only really ride road bikes for commuting and with mates on the odd weekend and have done for about the last five years, I’ve ridden MTBs for the last ~25 years or so.
    I don’t do sportives or audax’ and I’m not in a road club, I’m basically just an MTBer who also owns and enjoys riding a road bike.
    I’m also deeply suspicious of “elites” based on nothing more than time served. But I’m quite sure I don’t get to be in the gang yet anyway, thank ****…
    Lately I’m seeing more roadies out and about, my only real judgement on any rider is weather or not they return a nod/smile or stare ahead in grim stoney silence, you get both sorts of behaviour from newbies and the “proper” roadies.
    Which just tells me there’s as much chance of someone who’s been riding 30 minutes being a prick or alright as there is someone who’s been at it 30 years…
    Yeah people at work are suddenly acquiring an interest in cycling and shock horror they want to talk to people who’ve been at it a bit longer and pick up whatever they can.
    What sort of git hog’s the knowledge and tries to discourage people from taking up something they enjoy themselves. I can think of nothing more miserable and antisocial.

    Very good post. There’s far too much elitism wrapped up in the whole roadie “club” culture. No wonder people are looking for ways of riding with other like-minded folks without having to deal with that lot.

    Premier Icon stilltortoise
    Subscriber

    ^Bought that book a few weeks ago. It is a very pretty book and quite inspiring. It won’t liberate me from sportives though. I have no desire to participate in road races but I do like being part of an event. As for route-finding, sometimes I like to ride somewhere new without having to think or worry about making the wrong turning.

    As for bad weather, if I want a good long day out in the saddle I have to pick a day and stick to it, not wait for good weather.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
    Subscriber

    Alternating between quietly confident, and bricking it. My first Audaux, so in at the deep end….

    Wow, average of 175 miles a day for 5 days. I like this quote from the website:

    This should mean that even novice riders should be able to complete London Edinburgh London unsupported.

    Really? I’ve never ridden more than 80 miles in a day, although to be fair that was all at once. Felt fine afterwards but didn’t feel like doing a great deal the next day! Do long, multi-day rides get easier after the first couple of days? Is all the riding done in a couple of shifts with lunch in the middle or do you break it down into smaller chunks and basically spend all day riding with lots of breaks? At 15mph average 175 miles would be about 12 hours solid riding!

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
    Subscriber

    Do long, multi-day rides get easier after the first couple of days?

    Sort of, although I’ve only done slow-speed touring before, nothing like this.

    Done a few 300+km training rides, and am averaging about 27kph moving/ 23kph total. Last one I did also had 3500m ascent in it and I got home feeling capable of keeping going.
    My preferred technique is to get going and keep going. Stop every 80km/3 hours (which is conveniently where the control points will be), sit down, eat a sandwich and piece of cake, have a cup of tea, head off again asap. Like that I can potentially go for a helluva long time. One of the first big rides I did was riding home in Northumberland from the in-laws in Essex. 600km in days, first day was 375km and took me 18 hours. Solo riding across the fens into a headwind, sun-stroke, and onset of exposure later on as it got cold when the sun went down. Back on the bike 7 hours later and rode the remaining 225km.

    Edric 64
    Member

    Well 12hr tt riders do 200 to 300 mile for the half day .Im at the crap end of that, 216 /224 worst to best rides but thats for one day .With a bit of training 175 should be attainable

    Edric 64
    Member

    I always prefer to spend little time at controls .I clock in grab some food and water use the toilet and get riding again.Half an hour in control is at least 6 miles lost.I also find it better to take short breaks otherwise I cool down and my legs dont want to work after

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    What you smell is someone who cant see the point of lining someones pocket with 25 quid to be spoonfed a route you could do on your own

    Meanwhile, down at the velodrome.. left, left, left, left again, left, then left, left, and left, then left… 😉

    Edric 64
    Member

    Are you riding my session on Aug 11th ?

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I’d love to but it’s my kid’s birthday. Dad duties.

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Subscriber

    Do long, multi-day rides get easier after the first couple of days?

    Yes, most people have their worst day on Day 3.
    After that it sort of picks up as the body suddenly resigns itself to the fact that it has to ride a bike again.

    What’s entertaining on Sportives or long days out is watching everyone cane off like an idiot at the start. 3 hours later you ride past them as they’re weaving all over a climb looking like Voeckler on a bad day out.

    Premier Icon imnotverygood
    Subscriber

    What you smell is someone who cant see the point of lining someones pocket with 25 quid to be spoonfed a route you could do on your own .Its the cost and the spoonfeeding /bum wiping nature of them I dont like.At least on an Audax you pay your 8 quid have to think to follow the route and if you break down they may have given you a taxi firm number!Either do Audax or enter a 4th cat race I dont get sportives especially the competitive sportive riders

    This is why Audax UK has more members aged over 70 than under 40 while sportives seem to go from strength to strength.

    boblo
    Member

    Or perhaps people feel the need to be cosseted as they worry about the rigours of navigating/repairs/traffic etc and feel safer going for the softer option?

    This sums it up:

    I have no desire to participate in road races but I do like being part of an event. As for route-finding, sometimes I like to ride somewhere new without having to think or worry about making the wrong turning.

    This in the day when probably the majority of keen roadies ride with a Garmin (or similar). I’d happily ride with the Audax beardies but you won’t find me on a Sportive.

    Premier Icon imnotverygood
    Subscriber

    Yes, but that is the point: there are people who like ‘extreme’ sport (like riding for 12 hours solid) but most people don’t. The Audax/sportive debate is funny because the amount of support you see for Audaxes on the Internet is in inverse proportion to its popularity, likewise with sportives.
    Edit: I wonder, with my cod psychologists hat on, that it might well be something to do with the fact that people who enjoy riding huge distances on their own could be the sort who have problems with empathising with what other people might feel about the subject.

    boblo
    Member

    Are there only two groups then?

    Premier Icon imnotverygood
    Subscriber

    No, some people like to ride Spaudaxes but we don’t like to talk about them. Beard, sandals & Lycra doesn’t even bear thinking about.

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Subscriber

    Audifs are where it’s at for 2013 – SPLITTER!!!!

    Premier Icon DaRC_L
    Subscriber

    Are there only two groups then

    Yes Cod and Haddock

    lemonysam
    Member

    Out of interest. How crap can you be and still have it be worth turning up to a cat 4 race? I’m not completely rubbish, I can stick with fast-ish groups on club runs, and had been pondering doing one. If I can’t hack it will I have a miserable time or be a massive burden for the organisers?

    tonyd
    Member

    I’ve only ridden one sportive but I quite enjoyed it. It gave me the opportunity to ride through a lovely location (New Forest) with a good friend I hadn’t seen much of. We had a good chat, enjoyed the ride, and didn’t have to keep stopping to check maps. I didn’t realise people treated them as a race.

    There’s far too much elitism wrapped up in the whole roadie “club” culture

    I don’t think this is particular to roadies or clubs, there’s been quite a lot of moaning in the last few months about the extra riders at Swinley at the weekends. Lots of newbies going over to give it a try, good luck to them I say (I’ll ride midweek in the evening to avoid the crowds)

    tonyd
    Member

    @DavidB (or anyone that owns his book) – that looks like a good book, and would make a great present for a friend of mine. Are there (m)any routes in the South/South East? As much as I’d like to think we’ll get to Skye etc the realist in me says not for a long time.

    Edit: Just downloaded the GPX bundle, looks like yes so that’s a birthday present sorted – nice one!

Viewing 40 posts - 41 through 80 (of 97 total)

The topic ‘Sportive, sportive, sportive, and new road cyclists’ is closed to new replies.