sportive geometry road bikes, am i missing any?

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  • sportive geometry road bikes, am i missing any?
  • andyl
    Member

    Focus Ergoride? 2012 model got good reviews.

    Genesis equilibrium
    Scott something or other (CR1?)

    Ramsey Neil
    Member

    Cannondale Synapse .

    Premier Icon jam bo
    Subscriber

    Spesh sectuer – cheaper roubaix

    mdb
    Member

    BMC Gran Fondo

    aa
    Member

    wilier gran turismo
    colnago ace

    Premier Icon rOcKeTdOg
    Subscriber

    looking for long ride comfort rather than out and out race, but do like a bit of in the drops action so other than

    Trek Domane
    Giant Defy
    Merida Ride
    Cube Agree
    Spesh Roubaix
    Planet X RT58

    what others are out there?

    saladdodger
    Member

    mock not Kaffandbak

    Premier Icon johnnystorm
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    Ribble have about 73 different models with sportive in the title in both carbon & alloy.

    Premier Icon Sandwich
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    One of the Bianchi C2C range?

    crikey
    Member

    I noticed your question on Bikeradar…

    I think the actual, real, authentic difference is not very much at all. Essentially ‘sportive’ geometry is all about a slightly taller headtube, and not really much else.

    The thing is that you get used to the bike you ride, so you would get used to a slightly taller headtube, or get used to a slightly less tall headtube over time.

    My advice would be to buy the bike that makes you go ‘Ooooh.’

    You’ve got to love it, to want to ride when you are tired or fed up or it’s raining, or your legs hurt; so get the one you really like…

    Ritchey road logic. http://www.charliethebikemonger.com/ritchey-wcs-road-logic-frameset-3394-p.asp

    All the ones on your list sound like they are alloy or maybe carbon. If you are looking for 100 mile comfort I would look a steel or ti.

    Alloy bikes tend to come alive when you are belting it out, but are a bit harsh. After 70 miles I am not belting it out, I am surviving, and wondering what neck cramps are doing in cycling?

    But there ain’t much choice in nice steel until you dig deep.

    Ramsey Neil
    Member

    All the ones on your list sound like they are alloy or maybe carbon. If you are looking for 100 mile comfort I would look a steel or ti.

    Carbon can be made to give soft ride characteristics , the Specialized Roubaix and Trek Domane are designed to flex and take out some of the road chatter and many races over cobbles have been won on them , Paris Roubaix 3 of the last 5 years on a Roubaix and this year on a Domane .

    mrchrispy
    Member

    Next bike for me is going to be something like a roubaix or domane when they put discs on them

    velomanic
    Member

    Felt do some nice ones – Felt Z Series Road Sportive

    Premier Icon scotroutes
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    ramsey wrote:

    Carbon can be made to give soft ride characteristics ,

    That. There’s a world of (comfortable) difference between the Focus Cayo I had and the Cube GTC Agree I now ride. A good frame designer can use the characteristics of carbon to make a frame stiff where it needs to be and compliant where that helps.

    Marmoset
    Member

    Same with my Cannondale Six and Wilier Gran Turismo – the Wilier has by far the smoother ride, and I thought the ‘dale was already good.

    Premier Icon nickc
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    If you are looking for 100 mile comfort I would look a steel or ti.

    Or Carbon.

    After 70 miles I am not belting it out, I am surviving, and wondering what neck cramps are doing in cycling?

    This has nothing to do with material, and everything to do with fit.

    This kind of faux-retro nonsense is the sort of shit that only belongs in a Rapha catalogue.

    bikebouy
    Member

    Looks 675.. Could be a bit marmite, but it ride lovely. I took one out the other day as it happens and it’s a really nice ride, ok so I didn’t crack more than 8 miles on it but what I was able to do was ride some cobbles. Nice, stiff, comfy are the impressions I got from it.

    [/url] image by bikebouy, on Flickr[/img]

    Ramsey Neil
    Member

    Next bike for me is going to be something like a roubaix or domane when they put discs on them

    I’m pretty sure that they do a Roubaix with discs already .

    nickc – That is one hell of a misquote.

    You left out the bit in the middle about alloy being stiff and claim shit!

    “looking for long ride comfort”

    If I had the budget… I would put this( or something like this ) on my list… http://salsacycles.com/bikes/colossal_ti

    stufive
    Member

    Love my CR1 😀


    Fred whitton hardknott 2013 by Stufive, on Flickr

    A couple of other things to dwell on regarding day long comfort

    Cinelli make gel inserts to run under the bar tape, isolates you from the vibes. Also i find the diameter is just nicer as i have big hands.

    Consider 25mm tyres, a small additional weight for more comfort, especially on back roads. My old mechanic told me that tests had found 25mm to be faster than 23mm, but that is no doubt a can of worms. But it will also protect the wheels from potholes a bit better , and the larger contact should help in bad weather.

    Arse butter.

    To do a good time on a 100 mile sportive, you have to finish the 100 mile sportive.

    Something as simple as a puncture will ruin it. So I use schwalbe tyres with some sort of protection.

    Premier Icon zilog6128
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    I recently went through the same deliberations as OP. I noticed that most (if not all) brands now do a “sportive” model. It almost seemed to me as if this is the latest fad with road bikes (now that everyone has a crosser!) As mentioned earlier they mainly have a longer head tube, also the off-the-shelf models all come with compacts and 25mm tyres. They all seemed pretty much of a muchness to be honest.

    I went for a 2012 Cannondale Synapse hi-mod carbon in the end (mainly because it was almost half price at Paul’s, although the Cannondale sizing does suit me well). FWIW I find it noticeably more comfy over bumps (including cobbles) than my steel cross bike (which in itself is a very nice ride).

    scud
    Member

    All i can add from someone who had never ridden a proper road bike 4 months ago, to now having done 5x 100 miles and 2 x 150 miles in the last coupe of months in training for 250 miles in 24 hours next month is:

    – Bike fit, whether it be one in a shop or someone who knows what they are talking about, doesn’t matter what bike you have if it is set up all wrong, you are spending a lot of time in one position and it is about being as efficient as possible.
    – Good quality bib shorts and Assos minty ar*se lard.
    – Shoes with a good quality insole not the thin unsupportive things that come with them, these are great: http://www.esoles.com/
    – This bar tape is fantastic, and easy to apply as you can re-wrap it: http://www.bicyclechain.co.uk/productdetails.asp?productid=11314&gclid=CJbew9qlpLcCFVMbtAodoR0AVw
    – Eat lots (and make it things you enjoy) and keep drinking!!

    Premier Icon MoreCashThanDash
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    Slightly left-field, but as a Spesh Roubaix owner, I’ve been amazed how comfortable my Pinnacle Arkrose 3 CX has proved to be.

    Some 28mm tyres, better bar tape, would makes a nice sportive/audax bike, and takes mudguards and a rack

    clubber
    Member

    Maybe not quite so harshly put but I have to agree with nick to some extent. A bike with the right geo and a good design will be good for comfort almost regardless of the material. I’d particularly note that carbon is often much better for comfort than many steel bikes, particularly at the more reasonable prices where steel often lacks any real stereotypical steel feel.

    IME also, a decent aluminium frame with carbon seat stays (and ideally chainstays) will often give a noticeably smoother ride than some stereotypical aluminium frames.

    Charlie’s suggestion of gel inserts under the bar tape is a good one though.

    globalti
    Member

    I have a 2006 Roubaix, which is pretty comfortable and obviously vertically flexy, judging by the way the deep Roubaix tyres, when fitted, have scored the underside of the brake stay!

    I have a Spesh Tricross disc as a winter bike/tourer/family rides bike and despite being in stiffer aluminium it’s actually more comfortable over long distances than the Roubaix thanks to an even more upright position.

    I recently tried a neighbour’s 2012 carbon Orbea and was amazed at the improvement in acceleration and hill-climbing stiffness that 6 years of development has brought to carbon bikes.

    chief9000
    Member

    I was in the same situation some time ago. Personally I would maybe test a coupe, if you have the chance.

    In relation to carbon vs other materials, a good carbon frame can be designed to be more comfortable than any other material, so don’t let that put you off. There is also some tuning you can do with the right seat post and seat without great expense.

    I am personally a fan of cube bikes, I have tried against some larger more well known bike models and I have found them to be excellent value for money in terms of spec and weight. In rid quality and handling they are also a winner and in my opinion out handle my road bikes which have cost double.

    Also in terms if sportive geometry, I thought about this before too. But in the end I went for a regular race geometry. I did this as I want to have the aggressive position if I want, you can just put an extra spacer to raise the handlebars if you are worried. Also, I don’t know what sportives you will be riding, but those I do have a great deal of climbing, 70% of the time or more is on the hoods.

    I would take a good look at cube agree, don’t know much about the others, but in general good bikes. German quality and engineering, but you are not paying huge amounts for the name.

    Good luck!

    llama
    Member

    cannondale synapse

    I’ve got an alloy one and it’s as comfy as a steel frame and fits big tyres

    Clubbed… I agree.
    You need to get all the elements right. Get the fit right, geo right, and the material. Throw in components, food, good riding mates etc etc
    And yes there are some dead dull and stiff steel frames around.
    I was not knocking carbon, I was referring specifically to alloy, as in an entirely alloy frame. It certainly would not be my choice.

    whatnobeer
    Member

    Some good advice up there. The material is only half the battle, geometry makes a big difference to comfort as well.

    Some 28mm tyres, better bar tape, would makes a nice sportive/audax bike, and takes mudguards and a rack

    Personally I wouldn’t want 28mm tyres near a bike that I was doing long (100+ miles) on. Winter bike has them on and it feels like a big heavy lump. Get some lighter 25 mm tyres on and it feels great.

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
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    Shoes with a good quality insole not the thin unsupportive things that come with them, these are great

    I’ve noticed on longer rides that my feet start to get a bit painful, worse when its cold. I might have a look at new insoles. Thanks for the idea.

    As for bike, I ride a On One ti ‘cross bike with 28mm tyres and full mudguards. In a way its overkill for a Sportive (built for Audax), but I bumped into the Evans Ride-It sportive in Langholm yesterday. Roads were filthy after saturday’s rain and I certainly had a cleaner dry ass than anyone else. Wet ass = sore ass after not so many miles…

    Cletus
    Member

    I bought a Planet X sportive bike with a Lynsky Ti frame and Dura-Ace for £2k a few years ago and it is fantastic 🙂

    I did a two day 180 mile sportive event last weekend on it and felt pretty good throughout. My old Klein alu bike was great for shorter distances but harsh once past the 60 mile mark.

    Unfortunately Planet X are no longer offering this model so think of this as a recommendation for titanium.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
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    whatnobeer – Member

    Personally I wouldn’t want 28mm tyres near a bike that I was doing long (100+ miles) on. Winter bike has them on and it feels like a big heavy lump. Get some lighter 25 mm tyres on and it feels great.

    i don’t know, my 28mm continental four-seasons are only 30grams (or so) heavier than the 25mm versions.

    (i’ll weigh them when i can be bothered – but they’re not ‘heavy lumps’)

    and at 10psi less than the 25’s they replaced they’re very comfy on sheffield’s completely-bolloxed roads.

    i suppose there may be some negligable aero disadvantage…

    Premier Icon ir_bandito
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    Personally I wouldn’t want 28mm tyres near a bike that I was doing long (100+ miles) on

    I too run 28mm GP4seasons, on wider rimes (Velocity A23). Some of the roads round here are terrible, and they make a fantastic difference.

    Premier Icon martymac
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    i run 32mm conti gatorskin front and hardshell rear.
    me and a mate on 25mm schwalbe luganos did a roll down test from 15mph on a slight downward gradient (bike track on an old railway line)
    we went for about 2.5 miles before we could actually notice any difference more than about 3″ (he was ahead by 3″)
    i could make that up in 50 yards by tucking in behind someone.
    both riders same weight, both on hoods, all tyres at correct pressure.
    outcome of this, he now has 28mm tyres.
    i will say though, the 32mm are a bit overkill, my next ones will be 28mm.
    also, we were both 23 stone at the time.
    his bike is a 2012 cannondale caad8, and it only just takes 28s.

    Premier Icon nickc
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    Charlie, selective maybe, misquote? Don’t think so, unless I got it wrong and you weren’t trying to suggest that frames made out of a material other than steel can be comfortable?

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