Viewing 19 posts - 121 through 139 (of 139 total)
  • Someone buys a flat above a music venue…
  • Premier Icon dyna-ti
    Free Member

    In Glasgow a couple moved to the flat above a butchers and before long complained to the council the noise of the cleaver chopping in the morning was annoying them.

    The council banned the shop from chopping before midday and they shut up shop 6 months later. They had been on that site for 70 years.

    A year later the couple moved.

    Premier Icon tjagain
    Full Member

    Edukator

    You simply missed the point that 30 years ago this was not a residential neighbourhood and the rooms above the venue were empty and the buildings around it not residential

    Premier Icon i_scoff_cake
    Free Member

    The occupier has every right to complain. In tort law, the ‘coming to nuisance’ defence is incredibly weak.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    I’ve just remembered the flat my fiance lived in when I met her. Under a paint shop… Bedroom directly under the paint mixer.

    As for feeling bass in the bath. That’s what farts or for isn’t it?

    Premier Icon RustyNissanPrairie
    Full Member

    We used to send kids up chimneys – doesn’t mean it’s okay for N&D to carry on being noisy **** as the landscape has changed around them.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    34 years since I read it to anybody. the 1974 COPA was based on the European Communities Act 1972.

    Is that your way of admitting that you got the wrong year?

    Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    I’m of the opinion you buy a flat in a town centre next to a live music venue and you don’t expect noise you are an idiot.

    I’m sure they could have bought another **** flat 200m away and not had am issue.

    Issues with the developer.

    Premier Icon Duggan
    Free Member

    We used to send kids up chimneys – doesn’t mean it’s okay for N&D to carry on being noisy **** as the landscape has changed around them.

    It hasn’t really, though. The street is full of other bars, shops, pubs buses and people the whole time and is in the middle of Manchester City Centre. Closing N&D won’t transform it into a quiet, leafy suburban paradise.

    Chimney sweeps is a daft comparison, we stopped doing that because it was inhumane, it wasn’t the subject of a civil legal dispute about nuisance.

    As someone else has already said the fault must surely lie with the developers and the planning laws. I’m sure there is a reasonable middle ground between a tenant listening to bass every night and a 30 year old music venue that is loved by the community having to move premises every time a single person complains.

    Premier Icon pondo
    Full Member

    There’s a thread running about people moving next to a school and complaining that it gets busy at drop off and pick up time….. 🤣

    is this any worse than those who buy a house opposite a school then moan about the parking for 2 hours every weekday?

    That’s the analogy you’re going to use? Well ok, let’s fill it out further. 🙂 No problem with the school or the traffic, it’s just the few that break parking regs for their own convenience and screw things up for all other parents. It’s like moving near a music venue and not minding the venue, or most of the patrons, but being a bit annoyed at the handful that piss up your front door every now and then. Clearer? 🙂

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

     I’m sure there is a reasonable middle ground between a tenant listening to bass every night

    I think the resident has actually not really complained that it’s a venue that plays loud music, He understood that plainly when he moved in, he’s complained that it that plays music until 3 or 4AM.  Which, if we’re honest, for a area that now does share it’s space with home owners, is somewhat anti-social

    Premier Icon edhornby
    Full Member

    “The slow inexorable death of culture.

    Complete hyperbole. While there are musicians who want to gig, there will be places for them to play.”

    It’s really not – loads of music venues are being closed because of the rising cost of premises (rents, rates etc), most manchester city centre music venues have had licence challenges like these and the costs defeat them. And they aren’t being replaced because the alternative venue locations just don’t exist, because everything that can be a residential is being converted (look at the proposed block of flats that they are trying to build right next to the Britons Protection on a square of land that’s too small for a pair of houses). The physical space doesn’t exist for new music venues and the ones we do have need to be cherished.

    And before anyone says that there are loads of pubs and bars opening up, look at the average size of your new craftbeer bar, loads of them are tiny and don’t have enough clientele to support turnover plus bar profit plus gig fees for working musicians.

    There are loads of musicians out there that don’t have places to play.

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Full Member

    It’s really not – loads of music venues are being closed

    The problem is that nobody knows, because there’s never been any sort of census of small music venues. It’s really easy to announce that these places are under threat nationally because some well known venues are being threatened with closure but, as I say, nobody actually knows anything more solid than there are aren’t as many pubs around now than there used to be, therefore there are fewer small music venues.

    From The Guardian:

    “The live music industry’s thriving,” Davyd says, “but the smallest venues are falling off the chart. What we’re left with are these megashows with very high ticket prices, which buoy up the headline figure. Will two more new shows at the O2 in London feel the same as 250 shows at a small venue?”

    Each city is unique, but while London’s music scene is partly regrouping away from the centre – Hackney thriving while Soho fades – the headline figure is one of decline. Of the 430 music venues that traded in London between 2007 and 2015, only 245 are still open, according to the trust. National figures are currently unknown, but Davyd says he’s been contacted by more than 60 troubled venues in the last year.

    Anecdotally, the places I go to watch gigs these days are not the places I used to go – not so many sports halls or school/community halls and more small converted chapels or town centre basements with a bar wedged into the corner – but there are still as many venues around here as there used to be, give or take. As it says above, other areas will be different.

    Premier Icon desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    What we’re left with are these megashows with very high ticket prices, which buoy up the headline figure. Will two more new shows at the O2 in London feel the same as 250 shows at a small venue?

    that just doesn’t make sense, because it’s not really comparable – small bands at small venues are like a different industry from the over-charged 02 type gigs.

    Premier Icon wordnumb
    Free Member

    It is comparable. Although people will pay over the odds for some heavily promoted big show, fewer people turn up at a small venue speculatively to listen to a local or smaller-level touring band than ever. The problem is multifactoral but the closure of small venues, or pressures on them such as cost / threats of closure / people wanting them to move to the middle of nowhere, doesn’t help.

    Premier Icon grum
    Full Member

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

     threats of closure

    To be clear in this particular case, no-one is threatening to close the venue, just asking it to stick the licensing laws that it’s previously agreed to.

    Premier Icon inkster
    Free Member

    “that just doesn’t make sense, because it’s not really comparable – small bands at small venues are like a different industry from the over-charged 02 type gigs.”

    Think of it like the fishing industry. All the big commercial trawlers swallow up all the fish so there’s nothing left for the little guy.

    Opportunity is key, if there are no small venues left then there is a lack of opportunity for new artists to perform or experiment, and a lack of opportunity for audiences to get involved and start to support and create scenes, (the lifeblood of the British music industry for most of our lifetimes).

    What you end up with is corporate interests taking control and corporate interest don’t like change, they prefer spread sheets and predictability. Underground scenes emerging, introducing creative volatility and shaking up the music industry is a threat to their business model.

    If you are an independent promoter, try booking an established artist in this day and age, you’ll find they are usually on retainers with big corporate promotion companies (Warehouse Project etc), meaning the artists are prohibited from playing for smaller promoters during specified times of the year (the profitable time of year).

    Premier Icon desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    Think of it like the fishing industry.
    It’s **** all like the fishing industry. Small fishing vessels mostly pick up the quality higher priced items and big commercial trawlers sell cheap, bulk. Pretty much the opposite of the live music industry.
    Anyway, I’m on the small venue side, I love small venues and go to multiple every month. I actually don’t see them dying out, but that’s another matter.

    Premier Icon inkster
    Free Member

    Yep, all those Cornish fisherman love the big commercial trawlers from Europe hoovering up all the fish up to the 6 mile limit. It’s amazing how the big trawlers nets manage to discriminate between the ‘cheap bulk and the quality high prices items’, leaving only the tastiest morsels for the local boats.

    Anyhow, the fishing analogy was just a humorous aside, why are you taking it so seriously? Having worked in music promotions, (as it happens, promoting a few nights at the venue in question back in the day) I can assure you that the fishing trawler analogy served me rather well at the time.

    In fact, I probably got out of the game when I saw the big trawlers circling. Like the little boats, I was interested in quality over quantity but when the big boats come along and scrape the seabed dry you end up working with scraps.

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