Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 136 total)
  • Someone buys a flat above a music venue…
  • Premier Icon duncancallum
    Full Member

    People are pricks

    Same as people who buy near a race track or an air base….

    Surely the vibrant night life is why you live in Manchester centre!

    Premier Icon Harry_the_Spider
    Full Member

    I know of someone who moved opposite Sedgley Park RUFC and complained about match day disruption.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    Here’s the reading link – the one HTS shared was for signing petition

    https://www.change.org/p/manchester-city-council-remove-our-noise-abatement-notice

    Premier Icon grum
    Full Member

    I wonder if that relates to the new ‘agent of change’ guidance. Seems like that only applies to new developments.

    https://musicvenuetrust.com/2018/08/4-year-campaign-agent-change/

    Premier Icon Houns
    Full Member

    Daily I have to deal with people who moved to a woodland area moaning about trees

    Premier Icon 13thfloormonk
    Full Member

    Standard practice in Edinburgh, developer develops flats above nightclub, people move in, complain, nightclub gets shut down 🙄

    Premier Icon timbog160
    Full Member

    Unbelievable really isn’t it? When I worked in the rail industry we had a block of flats built right next to one of our, very busy, overnight servicing depots. The nature of these places means they are very noisy with trains being moved around all night, and it can’t be done during the day because the trains are all busy.

    Lo and behold within a very short period of time we had many complaints from residents, a noise abatement notice, and had to spend hundreds of thousands of pounds on acoustic barriers (looked remarkably like a wooden fence to me!). The council monitored it rigorously, and had no sympathy for the ‘we were here first’ arguments, by 150 years in this case!

    Meanwhile developers are off over the horizon with trousers stuffed with cash.

    Good luck to them but I’m not convinced common sense will prevail unfortunately.

    Premier Icon wordnumb
    Free Member

    There was a good one a few years back about a couple who moved to a traditional country village then immediately took legal action to have the traditional village church silence its traditional village church bell.

    Entitlementalists.

    Premier Icon redthunder
    Free Member

    @timbog160

    Opposite for me. Quiet railway yard for 50 years for me, trains sounding like trains.

    Until the class 166 arrived, POS idling at 40Hz is a killer noise, every night for the last couple of years. With no sign of stopping, even the rules state that if the train is stopping longer than 10 minutes the engines should be switched off. (GWR BY the Way)

    I hope the council do issue an Abatement Notice in our case.

    As for moving in above known music venue then getting it shut down is bit tragic for the club :(.

    Premier Icon crazy-legs
    Full Member

    Someone who moved into a house backing onto Herne Hill Velodrome complained about the noise from that, in spite of it being limited to a couple of mornings and a couple of evenings a week in summer (track wasn’t used during winter at that point).

    This is in spite of the fact that the velodrome had existed long before the houses and there was a decent collection of mature trees between it and the back of his garden, he couldn’t actually *see* any cycling, nor could any cyclists see over into his property.

    The Manchester case raised by the OP has got a lot of sympathy locally (in favour of the music venue). I do wonder with some of these cases if it’s a developer getting to build a block of flats in a derelict section above (eg) a music venue then getting one of their mates to move in, complain about it all, get the venue shut down and then redevelop the whole thing into flats.

    Premier Icon aphex_2k
    Free Member

    Happens here too.

    Music venue for 20+ years
    Apartments built next door
    People complain about the noise from the venue

    Also:- noise from school playgrounds
    Noise from well established freeway / main road

    Here’s a good one: Noise complaints from small town in the Perth Hills where cyclists are talking too loudly when they ride past.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Full Member

    There’s someone in Rothbury moved in a good few years ago. For the lovely country dream, pub, church and a village green location. They complain regularly about the church bells, the clock chiming, the pub they moved next to and more recently the beer garden being extended.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    I grew up on a hill down landing strip from RAF leuchars… In the phantom era.

    Phantoms going full chat a couple of hundred meters above you head is real noise. Or Chinooks coming over the tree tops and all the glazing rattling.

    There is an issue with urban areas though… Does the need for more housing trump a music venue? Well if it’s that or losing a green space… Yes probably. Silent disco gigs anyone?

    Or do what the Halt* in Glasgow did and keep the moany neighbour absolutely steaming in the bar.

    *Rip

    Premier Icon wordnumb
    Free Member

    With complaints about music venues it’s often not so much the noise of the music that’s the problem, its the noise of the crowd stood around outside.

    Premier Icon peekay
    Full Member

    There’s a thread running about people moving next to a school and complaining that it gets busy at drop off and pick up time….. 🤣

    Things I found out today

    Premier Icon grum
    Full Member

    There is an issue with urban areas though… Does the need for more housing airbnb flats and empty apartments bought as an investment by distant multi-millionaires trump a music venue?

    FTFY

    Obviously some people live there but I’m not convinced most city centre apartments are built for people to live in long term. There’s been a massive increase in apartment buildings in Manchester over the last 10-15 years – you still see huge numbers of homeless people.

    Premier Icon midlifecrashes
    Full Member

    I’ll be the dissenting voice here. Indoor businesses, at the very least in built up areas should keep their noise, light, smells and waste to themselves. They have had thirty years to sort this out, they know how much noise they make, they know they are surrounded by flats and have been since before they opened.

    Premier Icon irc
    Free Member

    @joshvegas

    +1 for RIP THe Halt. My local at one time when I lived in Woodlands Drive.

    Premier Icon oscillatewildly
    Free Member

    absolutely disgusting – this is one of the best small venue places in manchester – thats been there some 35 odd years, unbelievable to think the venues to blame and not the council for allowing it to be a residency above, either selfish **** pricks who bought it, at least people know where to send letters of disgust quite easily to the flat 🙂

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    Yeah, it’s weird how accustomed you got to the sound of the jet fighters!

    Studio 24 in Edinburgh suffered that fate too, a couple of others too (Sneaky Pete’s had issues and think it’s what shut The Venue down)

    Premier Icon Flaperon
    Free Member

    It all varies though, doesn’t it? Like the rail example. Things are kicking off in my sleepy Yorkshire town since all the trains were upgraded from the knackered Pacers to [insert new shiny train name here].

    Instead of people being pleased that they’re not on 50-year-old buses the main complaint was that the louder horns (whistles?) on the new trains were disruptive as they approached the town and complained about it quite loudly. Long story short, turns out that there were actually some whistle signs near the town missing which, have been replaced and the drivers reminded of the importance of observing them. I thought it was quite funny. The local Facebook group is raging.

    Conversely I have complete sympathy with anyone who sneaks into a church and cuts the strings on the bells. If they used them to play carols or something at Christmas, that’s fine, but the semi-random slightly-out-of-time clanging does my head in.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    Obviously some people live there but I’m not convinced most city centre apartments are built for people to live in long term. There’s been a massive increase in apartment buildings in Manchester over the last 10-15 years – you still see huge numbers of homeless people.

    Fair. Wasn’t trying to suggest it was a black and white issue which on reflection it does look like.

    I do think that Midlifecrashes has a point aswell. And any noise from crowds outside is still the responsibility of the venue.

    I’m on the fence. What have they done in the last 30years to improve any sound issues how have they addressed the previous issues etc? Manchester was very different 30years ago they should expect to also have to change as the area around them does.

    I also agree that movinging to the city centre isn’t what you do for peace and quiet.

    Premier Icon grum
    Full Member

    They have had thirty years to sort this out

    A lot of the problems have come about as the result of the smoking ban IMO. More people outside, expanded outdoor areas, doors open letting more sound system noise out etc. Many venues have probably got even more outdoor space now since CV, and people have got used to a bit of quiet.

    Call me a snob if you like but I think there’s an argument for curtailing big meat market type places with essentially zero artistic/cultural value, but that’s not the case for Day and Night cafe.

    Also, frankly that area was pretty scary at times before it became trendy, would people prefer to go back to that?

    People want to have their cake and eat it ‘I want to live in the cool area where I can brag about the vibrant nightlife but I also refuse to be inconvenienced in any way by it’.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    Yeah, it’s weird how accustomed you got to the sound of the jet fighters!

    First bump for the Mully boys.

    Also church bells are ace, I love hearing them clank away over the town.

    Premier Icon franksinatra
    Full Member

    Also church bells are ace, I love hearing them clank away over the town.

    Fair enough, I get it. But we stayed in Cornwall earlier this year and the church bells next to our house went off every 15 mins throughout the night. This does seem a little excessive and unnecessary. I wouldn’t go and complain to the council about it but just because something has always been done one way, doesn’t mean it can’t or shouldn’t change.

    I wonder how, in the little English villages with church bells, the villagers would react if a mosque was to open with a regular call to prayer broadcast through loud speakers

    Premier Icon kelron
    Free Member

    Interesting, I moved next to a busy road and get tired of the traffic noise, can I get it shut down?

    I joke but half the houses here have signs supporting a 20 year campaign to build a new road across the fields and footpaths on the other side so they don’t have to listen to HGVs anymore.

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    Reminded me of this sign:

    Pub’s Hilarious Sign For Its Neighbours from funny

    Premier Icon yourguitarhero
    Free Member

    I moved to Linlithgow. Faint church bell ringing on the hour is actually quite nice!

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    We’ve had a few very noisy years, surrounded my two massive building sites and a new rail line being installed at the end of our garden. Sort of got used to it, but one Sunday afternoon they started piling for new overhead lines. Shook the whole street…

    One of these driven in every 20m or so for about about a mile!

    Premier Icon Pigface
    Free Member

    In Cardiff there was a successful campaign to stop flats being built opposite Clwb Ifor Bach

    In Auckland there was a real scrap over Western Springs, why buy a house near a 70yr old race race track and complain about the noise?

    Premier Icon fasthaggis
    Full Member

    Phantoms going full chat a couple of hundred meters above you head is real noise. Or Chinooks coming over the tree tops and all the glazing rattling.

    🙁 Some of us miss all that^^, RIP the RAF@Leuchars

    There is a whole collection of strange folk brimming over with daft complaints when they ‘relocate’ to the country —> bells,farm animal noise,farm vehicle traffic,choice of shops 😕..
    Just be glad that we are all perfect ;-)🙃

    Premier Icon footflaps
    Full Member

    why buy a house near a 70yr old race race track and complain about the noise?

    People are stupid is my answer.

    Every summer my neighbours politely complain about the mature tree in our garden which over shadows their gardens. I always remind them that it was there long before they bought their house and will be there long after they’ve moved elsewhere.

    Premier Icon joshvegas
    Free Member

    🙁 Some of us miss all that^^, RIP the RAF@Leuchars

    I miss all that. It’s not the same going home. Watching the red arrows from your garden every year was mint.

    Premier Icon martinhutch
    Full Member

    Some of us miss all that^^

    I still miss Concorde hammering over my flat in Reading at the same time every morning. That was a beautiful sound.

    Premier Icon Duggan
    Free Member

    This is actually a recurring issue for the venue in question in the original post. The street used to be a tip and the area was a no-go zone and gradually as the areas has been gentrified these sort of complaints have happened several times to the venue as new waves of people move into the area to live.

    I think Fabric and Ministry of Sound both had similar issues in London though they are a different type of venue to Night and Day.

    Its pretty ludicrous to complain really, its right in the middle of what is now the busiest part of town, there’s no way you can move there and not expect noise. The issue is bad housing planning, as per the article.

    Premier Icon oldbloke
    Free Member

    Sneaky Pete’s had issues

    That’s one way of putting it. I lived almost opposite it for a year in the late 80s. It wasn’t the venue noise which was the issue and more the closing time fights. Came home one night to find a guy outside the front door stabbed and being tended to by an ambulance crew.

    Premier Icon robola
    Full Member

    I live next the harbour in a working fishing port. One of the neighbours complained to the harbour master about the noise of boats at night. I can imagine how that conversation went…

    Premier Icon nickc
    Full Member

    I’ve signed the petition, but I get the point that @midlifecrashes is making, businesses shouldn’t be allowed to pollute just because “we’ve been doing it for 30 years”

    Somewhere in the middle of new outraged tenants and businesses not wanting to spend money mitigating their noise pollution better; is a compromise. Probably

    Premier Icon poly
    Free Member

    Obviously some people live there but I’m not convinced most city centre apartments are built for people to live in long term. There’s been a massive increase in apartment buildings in Manchester over the last 10-15 years – you still see huge numbers of homeless people.

    Is that a serious post? Are people really so out of touch with the issues of homelessness that you think the main reason people are sleeping on the streets is because there are not enough buildings? And that new build city centre apartments are going to have any impact on it?

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