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  • Some advice about my Spaniel
  • Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    Of course we will be speaking to our vet but I know there is wealth of information here so thought I would ask.

    Our much loved 7 yr old Spaniel (picture below to avoid ban) has a number (4) of very small, apparently painless lumps spread around his body. We found the first about 4 years ago and had it biopsied. It was harmless and tiny (about 15mm across and protruding about 5mm) so we decided not to have it removed as it would require a general and I didnt want to put him through that as it wasnt bothering him. Since then he has developed 3 more, smaller lumps, again not causing him any bother but it is a bit of a concern for us. As I say we will take him to the vet next week but are these small lumps typical??

    Keeping us safe 🙂

    Premier Icon earl_brutus
    Full Member

    my little springer spaniel also had fatty lumps from the age of around 9 or so and these continued to appear and/or slowly grow for the rest of his life ( he lived to 15!). Vets checked them every year and biopsy was just they were fatty lumps, nothing to be worried about.

    Premier Icon willard
    Full Member

    Yeah, same here with my boy. One has got very large, but he is now old and frail enough that operating would likely not be wise. He is fine with it though. Not painful, not hard.

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    Thanks @earl_brutus

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    Thanks @willard

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    Just to add he is a Cocker. I am sure it doesnt make any difference

    Premier Icon onehundredthidiot
    Free Member

    Our last dog had them. Vet showed how to “pinch” round it to check it wasn’t attached. This, she said, shows its fatty so less to worry about.

    Pinch isn’t quite the right word.

    Premier Icon dovebiker
    Full Member

    All of our dogs have developed benign fatty lumps as they got older – some dogs are more susceptible than others

    Premier Icon furryaardvark
    Free Member

    People get them too, also skin tags, little grows of skin that do nothing.

    Premier Icon intheborders
    Free Member

    Our Cocker had this issue to.

    He had a big one removed when he was about 10 as it seemed to be bothering him and by the time he was ready for the big sleep it’d grown back bigger, but we felt it wasn’t sensible to have another operation in the year or so before as he was pushing 14 by then.

    Premier Icon mattbee
    Full Member

    Our Springer x Lab has had fatty lumps for a fair few years.
    He had some removed a couple of years ago as one was pretty close to his lipstick and they were worried about it affecting his ability to pee but as he’s now 12, with Aortic Stenosis they are just monitored. One on his chest is pretty big now. Doesn’t bother him but we’ve taken to calling it his stripper boob as it looks like a cheap back street silicon implant! 😂

    Premier Icon surfer
    Free Member

    Thanks everyone. Feel better after reading your comments and the ones he has are very small.

    We have our new addition arriving next Saturday (another Cocker) so expect a post of puppy gorgeousness 🙂

    Premier Icon rocky-mountain
    Free Member

    Our rescued Jack Russell, Trigger had them and still can get them, or something similar. In his case its an auto immune issue and we treated him with steroids ( what a combination). We had to make the decision if they got worse that would be it, we did and do not have the money for it, having fluffed up insurance, going for a cheap option

    The vet said, you can do all the tests you want, spend thousands and never really get to the end of it, in Triggers case he had only seen it twice in his career.

    Anyhow they have receded over the years, hes 11 now and still as fit as a fiddle.
    Here he is on a riding walk after 4 miles

    https://vimeo.com/user12784146

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