Solar Freakin Roadways…

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  • Solar Freakin Roadways…
  • marcus7
    Member

    I have seen it but remain sceptical… ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Subscriber

    Have we done this yet?
    Personally I thought it must be a joke… ๐Ÿ™‚

    [video]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlTA3rnpgzU[/video]

    Premier Icon Lifer
    Subscriber

    Freakin’ Tron!

    Perfectly doable on some scale (not sure every road/path/car park/driveway is achievable but would be cool!)

    pitduck
    Member

    silly idea ๐Ÿ˜†

    peterfile
    Member

    Someone calculated that it would cost many trillion dollars just to replace the existing infrastructure…never mind maintenance etc.

    The technology is obviously possible, but complete and utterly unrealistic.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Meh. Colour me unconvinced.

    Sure, nice idea but I just can’t see them standing up well to the elements.

    They can heat up to melt snow and ice. Great! So where do they get the energy to heat up when the solar panels are covered in snow?

    Okay lets assume they have some massive capacitors somewhere. I doubt the entire hex panel gets hot in all places. There will be cold spots on it. Ice will form there. When they melt the snow more ice will form there. The expanding ice will break the panels just like it breaks apart tarmac roads at the moment.

    Also, floods? That little drainage ditch alongside them didn’t look like it would cope with a good flood. Not to mention the issues with flood water full of debris being washed down a channel full of fibre optics and power lines. And is that drainage ditch heated too? Or does that just fill up with ice when they melt the snow?

    And lastly, tarmac is very cheap to make. These don’t look cheap! And despite those green credentials they are full of electronic and solar panels, which aren’t exactly “green” to produce.

    yunki
    Member

    on a similar note.. is this any good..?

    shermer75
    Member

    My two thoughts on this were:

    This is only going to work on quiet roads and car parks, otherwise the cars will block out the sun (obvs)

    It does look expensive, but the cost of energy is only going to go up, so eventually it’ll be cost effective

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    GrahamS – Member

    They can heat up to melt snow and ice. Great! So where do they get the energy to heat up when the solar panels are covered in snow?

    Other bits of the road network that aren’t covered in snow?

    Think the main objection to this is just, why roads? Roofs and pavements make more sense.

    Premier Icon GrahamS
    Subscriber

    Other bits of the road network that aren’t covered in snow?

    What like in neighbouring states / countries that are a bit warmer?

    Yeah could work. I thought the implication in the video was that they’d self-heat using power they collected, rather than drawing power from a remote source?

    Doesn’t address the other issues though.

    Roofs and pavements make more sense.

    Why would you want a pressure-sensitive lighty-up roof? ๐Ÿ˜€

    Premier Icon andytherocketeer
    Subscriber

    And despite those green credentials they are full of electronic and solar panels, which aren’t exactly “green” to produce.

    rape the sahara of 1m of sand every time they put another solar park there? and melt the silica in a solar furnace?

    might have some novelty value in things like top deck of multistoreys (the road bit, not the parking bays, obviously ๐Ÿ˜‰ ). but not convinced whatsoever about actual roads

    Premier Icon andytherocketeer
    Subscriber

    Why would you want a pressure-sensitive lighty-up roof?

    to out do the neighbours at christmas?

    lemonysam
    Member

    I’ll attempt to be an advocate though I think it’s probably a bit of a pipedream…

    This is only going to work on quiet roads and car parks, otherwise the cars will block out the sun (obvs)

    Surely the majority of roads away from junctions are exposed to the sun the majority of the time, certainly outside of cities. On a motorway for example, when there’s not queuing traffic there should be about 18 car lengths between vehicles (2 second gaps, obviously not always the case). There would be a reduction in efficiency but it would be calculable and in most areas probably not terminal. This probably applies more outside the south east.

    Think the main objection to this is just, why roads? Roofs and pavements make more sense.

    I suppose roofs pose a problem because by-and-large they’re in private hands, may be tricky to access and you need large numbers of small installation projects to cover the same area as even a fairly short stretch of road. Roads are also routinely closed for resurfacing so a maintenance cycle could be designed around that in a way that might be difficult with roofs.

    Pavements are largely in built up areas and are typically flush against or close to buildings meaning that most spend a large proportion of the day under heavy shade. I don’t know how this would affect efficiency but non-urban roads would certainly seem to get more sunlight that inner city pavements to me.

    Premier Icon Northwind
    Subscriber

    Good points those, cheers!

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