So what’s the STW banana skin view?

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  • So what’s the STW banana skin view?
  • Premier Icon funkmasterp
    Subscriber

    Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints

    I took your advice TJ. Left the bike and my shoes at home and carried a couple of my grandma’s photo albums (one in each hand). It really made the trails come alive!

    Premier Icon nickc
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    We do (on the mountains), that’s the whole issue.

    While I take my litter home, I’ve yet to see heaps of discarded banana skins littering the mountain side anywhere, TBH

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
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    I agree nikc.

    I think part of the reason for that (and this is an informed guess) is because we teach as many as we can to take thier waste home.

    It goes with many other wild place / mountain attitudes like being self sufficient, leaving bothies as you would want to find them, helping others in need etc.

    Jeebus, I’ve spent almost 25 years working for organisations trying to promote sensible environmental policies, but reading this thread gave me a feeling of enormous hopelessness.

    As the good book (should have) said;
    The stupid will always be with you, but now they’re breeding with the trolls.

    So I’m off to find a wilderness with “not enough soil” as apparently thats the perfect place to take a big shit on a banana skin.

    Onward and upward!

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    I’ve yet to see heaps of discarded banana skins littering the mountain side anywhere, TBH

    Top of Tryfan was a good place to see this. Orange peel and banana skins. It’s been a while since I was up there mind.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    No, it takes longer than 2 years…it still hadn’t decomposed after circa 2 years in the bottom of the bag. It had shrivelled, was black, rock hard and didn’t smell at all. It was a bit like a mummified Egyptian’s willy… I know it was two years as it had been hanging in my garage for two years since I’d last used it on a walking holiday.

    Because a British hedgerow mimics the conditions inside your garage? That’s obviously why fresh fruit lasts just as long as dried fruit. Ohh no, wait a moment fresh fruit rots……….

    Below the treeline a banana skin (or Apple core, or orange peel, or kiwi skin, or whatever fruit you want to eat) is going to disappear pretty quickly.

    I mean I must eat 10 banana a week, most of those end up on our compost heap, they don’t last a week there.

    As with most things I’d apply the principal of “what would happen if everyone did this”. Banana skins on Ben Nevis, definitely cary them home. Crimping one of like a bear in some woods miles from anywhere with only the occasional visitor, kick a hole in the dirt and get on with it. Banana skin whilst riding, sling it into the undergrowth, it’ll disappear to dust, But maybe not at a trail center which would get a bit manky if everyone did it.

    tjagain
    Member

    Subscriber

    Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints

    I took your advice TJ. Left the bike and my shoes at home and carried a couple of my grandma’s photo albums (one in each hand). It really made the trails come alive!

    I hope you left your clothes at home as well! 😉

    Rather than join in justifying why I drop banana skins, ignoring any evidence to the contrary that is placed before me, I going to change my habit as a result of this thread and stop chucking banana peel. Am I banned?

    That vegan ‘pulled pork’ can f*** right off though..:)

    Premier Icon edhornby
    Subscriber

    The park rangers responsible for keeping the place nice and safe for everyone have asked us not to do it.

    If you don’t have food waste recycling at home, pester your local council.

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
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    Am I banned?

    Nope. Group hug on the next StW ride as a punishment.

    Mods: Can you voluntarily ban yourself?

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
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    Take them home and eat them:

    That recipe sounds ace. I’d need to find someone to eat the bananas though as I’m not mad keen on them.

    Premier Icon Cougar
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    Tie them up in little bags and hang them from trees? (-:

    Playing devil’s advocate for a moment, I can kinda see where trailwagger is coming from. Three pages of discussion and the counter-argument basically boils down to “because I said so,” a lot of the reasons given are pretty vague. Eg, sure it’s “non-native,” but I’d be interested to hear if that actually has any bearing on anything or whether it’s just something that sounds pseudo-scientifically scary like saying “chemicals” or “radiation.” Does anything eat them? How long do they actually take to decompose naturally rather than at the top of a mountain or at the bottom of a biker’s sweaty sack? I’m off to do some Googling.

    (I don’t like bananas, but if I did I’d take any peel home with me if for no other reason than because it’s a bloody eyesore and whilst one skin is maybe neither here nor there the place would be a right mess if everyone did it.)

    Mods: Can you voluntarily ban yourself?

    We couldn’t on the previous version of the old version of the forum. I know because I got so cross at my own conduct once that I tried to ban myself for a few days and it wouldn’t let me. Post-upgrade I don’t know, I’ve never tried.

    what about all the fruit that drops from trees onto the floor? should we be going around clearing all those up?

    Having climbed Ben Nevis (and a few other Scottish mountains) I don’t recollect seeing any banana trees

    I

    PH Levels? did you make that up? What do you think is going to happen from a single discarded banana peel?

    So you’re the only person chucking away their rubbish?

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Subscriber

    Does anything eat them?

    The Hibernian Upland Vole is known to take them back to its nest – normally in the uppermost branches of Pink Heather Trees, safe from predation by Eagle-eyed Cherries – and feed the skins to its young. Unfortunately, extensive experimentation has shown that the youngest voles choke to death on their own vomit within 24 hours of eating banana skins. They have been nicknamed Jimis by the hordes of biologists studying these fascinating carnivorous rodents.

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Subscriber

    https://www.saveonenergy.com/material-decomposition/

    Banana peel (when not on top of a mountain), 2-5 weeks to decompose rather than two years.
    Apple core, two months.

    Interesting figures for those who said they’d take banana skins home but happily chuck an apple core…

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    I mean I must eat 10 banana a week, most of those end up on our compost heap, they don’t last a week there.

    A hedgerow isn’t like your compost heap.

    trumpton
    Member

    take them home with you. Not nice seeing a load of black mouldy skins on the trail, or bush.

    Apple core, two months.
    Interesting figures for those who said they’d take banana skins home but happily chuck an apple core…

    I imagine that at the bottom of a hedgerow in lowland Britain, something larger than a microbe would come along and eat the apple core long before two months are up.

    So, let’s say that people have been chucking their banana skins on Ben Nevis for the last 50 years or so. Presumably this has resulted in environmental devastation?

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Subscriber

    Sometimes I struggle for motivation to ride my bikes, so need to find a reason to go out. For instance, I’ll link up a series of castles. Or ice-cream parlours.

    This weekend I am going on a hunt for the piles of not-rotten discarded banana skins. There must be many places to find them, judging by the hyperbole outrage evidence on this thread.

    I have an alternative reason for not liking people leaving banana skins lying in the hills. My dog loves them, His farts afterwards are F£$%$ING awful. Please don’t leave banana skins lying, it spoils the evenings of what are otherwise lovely days in the hills.

    Premier Icon cheers_drive
    Subscriber

    What about dog poo that many is flicked of the path with a stick. That’s not natural.

    MYTH: I DON’T NEED TO PICK UP MY DOG’S POOP—IT’S THE SAME AS OTHER WILDLIFE.
    This myth surprised us—that dog poop is actually different than that of other animals. Here’s what the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics has to say about that: dog feces contains “harmful pathogens made up from the processed dog food, medications, and vitamins we feed our pets. These pathogens can make other dogs sick and add harmful additional nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus to the environment.” Depending on where you are, many plants thrive in low-nitrogen soil, and the presence of a lot of dog poop could in fact affect the area’s soil composition—and the ability of native plants to thrive.

    I’m siding with banana skins not left on the mountains but OK in hedgerow and forest.

    As most of us should know, apple pips contain a small amount of cyanide. These are miniature chemical weapons when in the paws of your average hedgerow resident. Us cyclists are completely unaware we are innocently militarising the hedgerow undercroft – which takes a dim view of the Geneva convention (moles especially).

    Premier Icon GavinB
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    What about dog poo that many is flicked of the path with a stick. That’s not natural.

    It’s not legal either in Scotland – all dog waste should be picked up.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
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    I saw some white dogshit the other day! Forget blue passports that’s a retro colour to bring back!

    A hedgerow isn’t like your compost heap.

    No, but it’s a better approximation than the top of Ben Nevis or dessicated in a backpack.

    And as someone linked to above showing 2-5 weeks, seems about right. The longest lasting things seem to be the stalks of broccoli can cauliflower.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    No, but it’s a better approximation than the top of Ben Nevis or dessicated in a backpack.

    It’s a hedgerow not a purpose built place to decompose of wanted organic material. Take your rubbish home with you scruff bag.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    It’s a hedgerow not a purpose built place to decompose of wanted organic material. Take your rubbish home with you scruff bag.

    You must be stressed October-November when they’re full of decaying leaves.

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    No, why would I be stressed of something that fell there naturally?

    FunkyDunc
    Member

    I’m happy with argument it looks ugly, but the environment bit annoys me some what.

    It’s ok to go up there and erode the landscape, it’s ok to go up there and leave traces of rubber from your shoes, it’s ok to drive there and pollute the air and make the valleys look a mess.

    But we can leave no trace 🤔

    Premier Icon bigjim
    Subscriber

    So what? If it takes 2 years to rot away, whats the problem with that?

    classy guy

    big_n_daft
    Member

    I have to hold my hand up and say I do this. In my view its a natural (I admit not native) plant that will rot away and enrich the soil.

    Soil enrichment from one banana skin isn’t an issue, it’s the thousands that get chucked that is. Soil enrichment allows more vigorous plant species to grow out competing the highly adapted species that normally grow in these poor soils. Due to the incremental loss of habitat these species decline together with the ecosystem that they are part of and yet another part of variation in UK ecosystems gets snuffed out.

    Just take it home and compost it for the backgarden

    It’s a hedgerow not a purpose built place to decompose of wanted organic material. Take your rubbish home with you scruff bag.

    Can you tell the “stick and flick” dog walkers that as well please.

    captmorgan
    Member

    3 pages in is it safe to tell the story of Kiwi Ken?

    Back in the early 90’s Kiwi Ken bounced into the office after lunch and asked if anyone wanted a “larnna”?

    A what he was asked.

    A “larnna” he says, the fruit and veg stall on London Bridge was doing them. “Four larnna’s for a pound, get ya luvly larnna’s here…” I’ve never had “larnna’s” said Kiwi Ken…

    I’d rather see as many banana skins by the roadside as I do mcbastiddonalds shite.
    Them, costa coffee, starbucks, kfc….
    But mainly mcdonalds. No matter which quiet country lane I ride down I come across their bloody tramp food wrapping! Saw 5 piles of it today & 1 banana skin.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    You’re really going to lose your cool when I tell you that I sometimes go blackberry picking and take very few photos!

    Won’t someone think of the baby robins and delicate ecosystem!

    I’m basically an ecological Genghis Khan.

    Premier Icon slowoldman
    Subscriber

    Top of Tryfan was a good place to see this. Orange peel and banana skins. It’s been a while since I was up there mind.

    They’re still there. Probably the same ones you saw.

    beefheart
    Member

    Should I pee in a bottle and take that home too?

    @big_n_daft
    “Soil enrichment from one banana skin isn’t an issue, it’s the thousands that get chucked that is. Soil enrichment allows more vigorous plant species to grow out competing the highly adapted species that normally grow in these poor soils. Due to the incremental loss of habitat these species decline together with the ecosystem that they are part of and yet another part of variation in UK ecosystems gets snuffed out.

    Just take it home and compost it for the back-garden”

    I don’t believe that the soils are ‘poor’*, rather, they’re just ‘immature’?

    Until the arrival of humans, the tree canopy would have extended right across the whole of the uk, save for the very tops of mountains.

    Once we lost the trees on the mountains, the natural process of soil formation (organic decay and inorganic erosion) would have slowed down considerably.

    Surely the extent to which any of the mountain-dwelling hardy plants that we see today are only there as the result of natural (non-human)processes is questionable.

    I’m under the impression that the British landscape is deliberately denuded, lest people forego their well paid careers to forage for berries and snuffle for truffles in some forest somewhere.

    *”EVERYTHING in Scotland is poor”, lols!

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