So, that habitable exo planet they have just found…

  • This topic has 25 replies, 21 voices, and was last updated 3 days ago by  kelvin.
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  • So, that habitable exo planet they have just found…
  • Premier Icon Poopscoop
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    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-49648746

    Its only about 100 light years away and I’ve called in a favour with Musk.

    I’m leaving Friday, anyone want to come with?

    I can’t guarantee that Brexit will not affect the planet even at this distance but I’m willing to give it a try.

    Premier Icon jimdubleyou
    Subscriber

    Its only about 100 light years away

    Is the favour some sort of momentum suspension machine?

    Even if you could accelerate and decelerate to/from the speed of light instantaneously, it would take you 100 years to get there, but your insides would have fallen out of your back as you sped up…

    On the plus side, at least you won’t have to deal with Brexit (which will only be marginally worse than having your organs fall out as your skin evaporates).

    Premier Icon neil the wheel
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    I don’t fancy all that tedious messing about in hyperspace

    CountZero
    Member

    I think the crucial word here is ‘potential’…
    There might be life, Jim, but not as we know it.

    Even if you could accelerate and decelerate to/from the speed of light instantaneously, it would take you 100 years to get there, but your insides would have fallen out of your back as you sped up…

    Not really.

    “Physicists generally believe faster-than-light travel is impossible. Relativistic time dilation allows a traveler to experience time more slowly, the closer their speed is to the speed of light.[32] This apparent slowing becomes noticeable when velocities above 80% of the speed of light are attained. Clocks aboard an interstellar ship would run slower than Earth clocks, so if a ship’s engines were capable of continuously generating around 1 g of acceleration (which is comfortable for humans), the ship could reach almost anywhere in the galaxy and return to Earth within 40 years ship-time (see diagram). Upon return, there would be a difference between the time elapsed on the astronaut’s ship and the time elapsed on Earth.

    For example, a spaceship could travel to a star 32 light-years away, initially accelerating at a constant 1.03g (i.e. 10.1 m/s2) for 1.32 years (ship time), then stopping its engines and coasting for the next 17.3 years (ship time) at a constant speed, then decelerating again for 1.32 ship-years, and coming to a stop at the destination. After a short visit, the astronaut could return to Earth the same way. After the full round-trip, the clocks on board the ship show that 40 years have passed, but according to those on Earth, the ship comes back 76 years after launch.

    From the viewpoint of the astronaut, onboard clocks seem to be running normally. The star ahead seems to be approaching at a speed of 0.87 light years per ship-year. The universe would appear contracted along the direction of travel to half the size it had when the ship was at rest; the distance between that star and the Sun would seem to be 16 light years as measured by the astronaut.

    At higher speeds, the time on board will run even slower, so the astronaut could travel to the center of the Milky Way (30,000 light years from Earth) and back in 40 years ship-time. But the speed according to Earth clocks will always be less than 1 light year per Earth year, so, when back home, the astronaut will find that more than 60 thousand years will have passed on Earth.” – wiki

    Premier Icon jimdubleyou
    Subscriber

    Not really.

    Well there you go, I didn’t really understand the physics in Interstellar either.

    Premier Icon maccruiskeen
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    but your insides would have fallen out of your back

    there’s already a thread about Gastroenteritis

    johndoh
    Member

    Bizarrely I have just got back from a Brian Cox lecture where this discovery wasn’t mentioned – he’ll have to do some quick script re-writing for his next show.

    chevychase
    Member

    I wouldn’t bother going anyway m8. I’m from there and it’s shit.

    WillH
    Member

    Apparently it’s a gas giant, not a ball of rock that you could land on. It’s more of a story about the technology/science of being able to detect water from that distance.

    tdog
    Member

    I’m totally in!

    Will bring my DVO shox as it’ll be 1 bumpy ride 🤪

    Premier Icon Poopscoop
    Subscriber

    ^^ You’re on!

    Oh, your driving there too ok? Im getting hammered on the way. I’ll drive back once sober.

    And if I say we need to stop for me to up chuck,I really mean it!

    Premier Icon funkmasterp
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    I’m seeing a theme to these threads you post Poopscoop. You appear to want a jovial thread and they turn deadly serious three posts in. I still have no clue what an agile scrum master is and quite frankly I’m very happy with that. The alternative appears to be knowing what one is and losing any personality as a result of said knowledge.

    Count me in on your journey to the gas giant.

    tdog
    Member

    I wonder if aliens on this planet have smellier gases than humans

    Also how attractive the opposite sex aliens might be compared to say our ever ageing dear Kylie

    tdog
    Member

    Nahhh poop but I will need my 29er ti ht to gain momentum whilst being comfy

    Spin
    Member

    I have just got back from a Brian Cox lecture

    My condolences.

    a spaceship could travel to a star 32 light-years away, initially accelerating at a constant 1.03g (i.e. 10.1 m/s2) for 1.32 years (ship time)

    Lets face it. It’s probably easier to invent a propulsion method that will allow a ship to accelerate at 1g for years on end than it is to come up with a universally acceptable brexit.

    philjunior
    Member

    I was going to point out what raybanwomble said, but not in as much detail. Go Wikipedia!

    taxi25
    Member

    For example, a spaceship could travel to a star 32 light-years away, initially accelerating at a constant 1.03g (i.e. 10.1 m/s2) for 1.32 years (ship time), then stopping its engines and coasting for the next 17.3 years (ship time) at a constant speed, then decelerating again for 1.32 ship-years, and coming to a stop at the destination. After a short visit, the astronaut could return to Earth the same way. After the full round-trip, the clocks on board the ship show that 40 years have passed, but according to those on Earth, the ship comes back 76 years after launch.

    Which gives the perfect excuse to post this.

    Just don’t be tempted to go and investigate the distress beacon on the way there or back. 😉

    Premier Icon IdleJon
    Subscriber

    Just don’t be tempted to go and investigate the distress beacon on the way there or back. 😉

    You won’t have a choice. The bosses will have programmed the ship and AI to automatically investigate. The working crew never get a say. Just like Brexit. 😁

    Premier Icon bodgy
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    100 light years? I’d huck that.

    BUILD THE WALL! BUILD THE WALL!

    johnx2
    Member

    It’s more of a story about the technology/science of being able to detect water from that distance.

    And more importantly the quality of the surf. Cue pissed off aliens, secret spots blown.

    (I may have to nod and smile fake knowingly when someone says ‘agile scrum master’, but I do know what it means to blow a secret spot.)

    DT78
    Member

    proper humpty question about time moving slower on the spaceship…would the astronaut still age at earth / normal pace? so whilst it might on say a short ish time spent to get their the astronaut would have actually died?

    Premier Icon kelvin
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    Which gives the perfect excuse to post this.

    Well done. Lovely. A favorite.

    would the astronaut still age at earth / normal pace?

    No. Did you never watch Buck Rodgers, or…

    Spoiler for ’original ancient classic film I hope everyone has seen’
    Planet of the Apes

    ?

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