so, it *might* be time to get a dog

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  • so, it *might* be time to get a dog
  • whats the consensus on a chocolate labradoodle?

    have been umming and ahhing over breed for a while and I reckon this could be then answer……

    looking for something not too big, very sociable (pub dog), happy but not bonkers.

    Have met a couple of these and I reckon it’s just about right…..

    anyone got one?

    JRTG
    Member

    Hmm that’s the brand of dog I want too…

    stox
    Member

    If they are anything like my chocolate labraDOR then you can’t go wrong.

    ashfanman
    Member

    Not a chocolate one, but some family friends have a yellowy one and it’s lovely.

    Would still prefer a weimeraner, or, for something smaller, a miniature schnauzer.

    COLIN!

    grum
    Member

    so, it *might* be time to get a dog

    Why, have you got a child’s face that you want biting? πŸ˜›

    bjj.andy.w
    Member

    whats the consensus on a chocolate labradoodle?

    A what? Oh you mean a mongrel πŸ˜‰

    Innes
    Member

    Why a Labradoodle?

    Get a Labrador.

    We were put off getting a chocolate one, they have a reputation for being a bit thick.

    We have a nice Black Lab now.

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    Had friends who had a black one, lovely dog. They were experienced owners their previous dog having been a Rotweiler so they would have chosen carefully and the dog was well trained. I would suggest you contact the kennel club / breeders association. FWIW Chocolate Labs are known to be slightly more highly strung than black Labs, I don’t know if that carries over to the cross.

    anthonyb
    Member

    Labradoodles are brilliant dogs. Ive owned 3 collies before owning my first ‘doodle,(Harley) he’s as smart as the border collies, soft as butter, can be guilty of ‘selective deafness’ from time to time, but is a really good lad most of the time seeing he’s only 2 years old. He’s also a big lad for a ‘doodle.

    Here’s Harley

    bwaarp
    Member

    Why a Labradoodle?

    Because when you combine the docility and affable nature of a lab with the intelligence and easy to train nature of a poodle you can get a very very good dog? Plus scruffy looking labradoodles are hilariously pathetic looking.

    smell_it
    Member

    I was really hoping this thread was going to start with the sentence ‘i have ice cream covering my genitals and my tongue won’t reach……. ‘

    jonah tonto
    Member

    Smell it had me in stitches πŸ™‚ I have a huge black labradoodle living here at the mo, he was a rescue I wouldn’t have chosen one, mainly due to the embarrassing name but I’d have one again they are great great dogs. I like labs temperament but have always had crosses cos labs suffer a bit in old age and a bit of interbreeding seems to sort this. I second the bit about chocolate labs being a bit manic and thick though

    stox
    Member

    Get a Labrador.
    We were put off getting a chocolate one, they have a reputation for being a bit thick.
    We have a nice Black Lab now.

    FWIW Chocolate Labs are known to be slightly more highly strung than black Labs, I don’t know if that carries over to the cross.

    A Load of ballocks on both counts

    Premier Icon Drac
    Subscriber

    with the intelligence and easy to train nature of a poodle you can get a very very good dog? .

    Yes because Labs aren’t known for being easy to train or intelligence.

    Just get a Lab.

    stufive
    Member

    Just get a black lab (bitch) and you cant go wrong Choc labs are as thick as mince and make sure you get a bitch whatever you do πŸ™‚

    stox
    Member

    I second the bit about chocolate labs being a bit manic and thick though

    Oops I missed this one… ANOTHER load of ballocks!

    ontor
    Member

    black lab here too. make sure you get one from good working stock though if you want it to run and run all day. As those that have ridden with Perrin the wonderdog will tell you, they’re pretty tricky to tire-out!

    Premier Icon porter_jamie
    Subscriber

    some shooting types dont even like yellow labs let alone chocolate ones, because supposedly they are less intelligent blah blah. i am not so sure. you get moronic behavoir from all 3 types of lab, but i think there is a perception that chocolate labs are owned by ‘fashionable’ types and hence they might not be as well trained as the ‘serious’ gundog types. make of that what you will.

    labradoodles are very nice dogs imo, but they can get quite big, make sure you know what you are getting

    hora
    Member

    I miss having a dog by myside. πŸ™

    stufive
    Member

    I spent most of my early working years as a gamekeeper and ive trained and worked with all jinds of labs spanials etc so im only going off what ive learnt and from what ive seen from hundreds of diferent dogs oviously you get the odd thick black one and the odd good yellow one but as a rule blacks are best πŸ™‚ I love the way these topics hit a nerve with some guys

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Subscriber

    We’ve had several Labs in the family over the years and the most insane one, by far, was a black ‘un. Having said that, he was a fantastic break dancer.

    I sometimes feel that folk mistake “I can’t be arsed to do what you want as I’m having a rest/fun/scratch/dump/sniff etc” for stupidity in some dogs….

    Premier Icon teamhurtmore
    Subscriber

    Despite the awful name there are some lovely labroddodles out there, plus there is the non-allergy aspect too. Still would recommend the king of gun dogs (!) first – the majestic, if occassionall wilful, flatcoat retriever.

    Several of my friends have black Labradors, they’re among the thickest creatures I’ve ever encountered. Very friendly though.

    If you are going to get a cross breed get a lurcher at least it’ll be cheap.

    Jimbo, I assume the first round is on the house, then? πŸ™‚

    FWIW, if it’s a pub dog, my first concern would be for the social nature of the animal above everything else. He/she will have to put up with all manner of strange people, let alone other dogs(!), coming in to his/her pub. If your dog doesn’t play well with others, word would soon spread and that could actually affect the pub’s business.

    flashy – totally agree – hence the want for a small, friendly, non territorial dog that gets socialized from day one (which is why I’m not interested in rescues).

    ps – I’ll happily buy you a pint if you pop down – would be great to see you. Badger and Sussex currently on.

    Email will follow…Got a little something else to deal with over the coming days, but would be great to come down for a beer! Good to hear it’s gone ahead!

    tracknicko
    Member

    lovely dogs. like a big shaggy labberdabber really.

    i don’t buy into the different colours of dogs making them more/less intelligent.
    my yellow lab (working lines) was born to two browns… so how would that work?

    one thing though…

    hence the want for a small

    have you seen many in the flesh? our lab was/is MASSIVE for his age, but was dwarfed by a labradoodle (same age) at puppy training classes.

    i’ve never seen a small one. I’d expect 30-35kg+ at a rough guess.

    stanfree
    Member

    Just get a Chocky lab , great dogs and not as daft as they are made out to be. Here’s mine ‘Charlie’ , my best mate in Life.

    Dolcered
    Member

    I’m not a fan of designer crossbreeds. All the labrador-poodles we met at obedience glasses were utterly mental and dwarfed my female GSD.
    Such big powerful dogs. I’m GSD biased but of that mix I’d rather have a poodle or a labrador.
    I think the non-allergy element is a bit of red herring, they do still cast to a degree.

    My local welcomes dogs and there is never any issue they are great to have around, the owners of the pub have dogs and the bar manager has a labrodoodle, another regular has a smaller doodle breed who’s a real character. In fact because the pub welcomes dogs does more for their trade than flashes hypothesis.

    FH, I agree, I’d rather drink in a dog friendly pub than a non-dog pub, but….Imagine if the landlord’s dog was a yappy, fighty, bitey monster? No one else would take their dogs there! πŸ˜‰

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    Very popular breed at the moment. And ideal if you want a big shaggy dog type thing.

    At the last count, Molly encounters 6 regularly in the park, all of which she gets on great with. I walk one of them sometimes for the owner and one of them belongs to close friends who occasionally have Molly overnight. They vary in size quite a bit though, from small collie-ish to big frickin shaggy bigger than a lab size. Each one of the six is quite different in terms of temperament, obedience, sociability,etc. which is probably more to do with the owner than the breeding. Go figure eh?

    All in all, a breed that can be fantastic in the right hands, but can also be quite high maintenance should you neglect a bit of tough love when they’re puppies. Not for me, but Molly seems to love them all – and not one of them has ever aggressively bullied her, despite being at least three or four times her weight.

    Premier Icon jambalaya
    Subscriber

    @stox – I think we should agree to disagree.

    @teamhurtmore – I wanted a flatcoat but the Mrs wanted a regular lab, as it was to be primarily her dog we went with the lab. Not sure flatocats would be good pub dogs, rather lively when they are young and sadly only have half the life expectancy of a black lab.

    @jimbo – I’d say from what I see here there is no negative feedback on the breed, as you say getting a pup (and one where you can research the parents temperament) and socialising him/her from a young age should mean they are comfortable in the pub environment. Almost all my favourite Surrey pubs have landlords dogs.

    w1zard
    Member

    Every labradoodle I have met has been friendly and affectionate. They’re a lovely breed, and I’m sure they would be fine as a pub dog.

    I’d go to the pub just to visit the dog – so it’s a business investment! πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    All I have to say is that SHORT HAIRED is best!
    That labradododooodly thing looks like it stinks and will make a right mess of the vacuum cleaner’s working parts!

    willard
    Member

    Spaniel? Fun is their middle name and, if you believe my younger dog (cocker spaniel), so are cuddles and love.

    Labradoodles are fine, but they are big and they do take a lot of work to exercise.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    they do take a lot of work to exercise.

    That’s a negative, is it? If so, get a bloody yorkie!

    deadlydarcy
    Member

    Some short haired dogs shed more than some long haired. So, the “short is best” is sometimes, and in the case above certainly is, wrong.

    meka
    Member

    Got a ‘brown’ Flatcoat & he’s the least thick dog I’ve had. Thicko dogs can be easier sometimes. This one takes a balanced decision each time & concedes only because I’m pack alpha, not him.

    “I can’t be arsed to do what you want as I’m having a rest/fun/scratch/dump/sniff etc”

    Yup

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