Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 41 total)
  • Small tent advice
  • Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    Im after some advice about tents. I have little or no idea about them, as my last tent experience 20 years ago involved putting up a tent in the hissing wind and rain and being very cold and wet for the night.
    My son is a Scout and needs a decent tent. Proviously he’s used a borrowed pop up tent, but he needs a decent one for hiking. I’m look for a recommendation about whats good out there.
    Im probably looking for something thats going to be out of budget, but it needs to fulfill as many criteria as possible.
    Small
    Lightweight
    Waterproof
    Double skinned
    Reasonably simple to put up
    2 man / roomy

    He’s looked at 1 man hiking tents and doesn’t like them, he compares them to a coffin.
    Budget is probably a max of £150.

    Your thoughts and suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks

    Premier Icon scotroutes
    Full Member

    Small and roomy?

    Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    Roomy enough to put his kit in, i’m not talking orangeries and wet rooms!

    Premier Icon Cougar
    Full Member
    Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    Some of those Vango ones look reasonable.
    Anyone got experience of the Alpha 200 / 300 or the Gamma 200 / 300?

    Premier Icon willow1212
    Free Member

    Worth looking at “nearlynewtents” on ebay, which seems to be a Vango outlet.
    I picked up a “refurbished” £200 RRP tent from there for £85 a couple of weeks ago. I haven’t pitched it properly yet but it seems completely brand new from what I can see, no sign of any repair, labels still attached, pegs are brand new.

    Premier Icon perchypanther
    Free Member

    I only came in here to see if Cougar had done the Winter of our Discount Tents gag yet.

    Is disappoint.

    Premier Icon donald
    Free Member

    I used to have a Vango tunnel tent. I could never keep the fly away from the inner so it used to wet out. This was possibly user error but the design didn’t help.

    Premier Icon johnners
    Free Member

    That Vango Spey is 3.2kg. If he’s hiking with that I hope he’s a big lad.

    Premier Icon convert
    Full Member

    Cheap, light, roomy. Choose two.

    Premier Icon pyranha
    Full Member

    Is your son expected to supply his own tent for Scout activities, or is this for non-Scout activities?

    I would expect any ‘official’ Scout trips to be using tents supplied by the Scout Troop (or Explorer Unit etc) – moves the damage risk away from personal kit to group kit (and tents are often more at risk of damage than the obviously ‘personal’ kit like sleeping bags, rucsacs etc). Also not everyone can afford a tent, whereas the other kit can often have multiple uses. What I’m thinking is who has said he ‘needs’ a tent and would he even be allowed to bring a personal tent on a trip?

    Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    Well he’s been to several camps last year and supplied his own tent, which was adequate, but something a little more robust than a pop up tent is required.
    Not sure what the issue is with him supplying his own tent. The troop is relatively small and has limited resources, so why not use his own tent?

    Premier Icon CheesybeanZ
    Full Member

    Hoolie 2 , normally on sale around £120.00 . We’ve got one and its grest for the money.

    https://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tents/hoolie-2-tent/

    Premier Icon Aus
    Free Member

    Vaude Hogan is a brilliant small tent, light, robust, v v quick to pop up

    Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    Im sure the vaude is a very nice tent but its about £150 over budget!

    Premier Icon steve_b77
    Free Member

    This OEX Phoxx II is great for the money, currently a bargain at £50

    5000mm of water head, light @ 2.2kg and easily accommodates one person and a load of stuff, my mate is 6’3″ and he’s fine in it.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    I think someone mentioned it yesterday, but have a look at the Vango Blade Pro 100, which is a very roomy one-person tent that’s reasonably priced too, can be had for around £80. Fine as a basic tent in good conditions and pretty spacious for a one-person tent and has a nice, light, airy feel inside. It’s around 1800g in real life. Finding a two-person tent at that sort of weight for £150 is going to be tough I think. Vango stuff is generally pretty decent value too.

    Edit: https://www.vango.co.uk/gb/tents/1079-blade-pro-100.html

    Premier Icon tomparkin
    Full Member

    No specific recommendations, but having done a bit of hiking/camping the following is high priority for me:

    * Weight is jolly important. If you’ve got to carry it up and down hills all day, the lighter it is, the better.

    * Once you’ve got to wherever you’re camping, it’s handy if you can pitch the tent without getting it too wet (because it’s inevitably raining), so something that pitches either outer first or all-in-one is vastly preferable to the inner-first approach.

    * Having pitched your tent you want to be able to dump all your wet clobber somewhere that isn’t inside the tent (and possibly have a sheltered space to cook too), so a decent-sized porch area is required.

    It’s also worth considering where you want to take the tent: a more robust tent will tend to weigh more than a less robust tent, but if you’re not planning to camp at altitude in heavy weather then it’s not necessarily worth the weight penalty to have something so sturdy.

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Actually… https://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/p/wild-country-tents-zephyros-2-ep-tent-D1314001.html

    That would kind of meet your criteria. I’ve not used one and I’m not a huge fan of the way single-poled tents of that design leave you lying with the inner hovering over your face when lying down, but it would do the job.

    Premier Icon globalti
    Free Member

    If you need a good tent at a budget price, join UKClimbing and put a Wanted ad on the forum. I did and I received about 8 offers of good tents, ended up buying a Terra Nova Quasar in new condition for less than £100, the seller said he had used it a dozen times but it looked unused to me.

    Premier Icon poly
    Free Member

    Well he’s been to several camps last year and supplied his own tent, which was adequate, but something a little more robust than a pop up tent is required.
    Not sure what the issue is with him supplying his own tent. The troop is relatively small and has limited resources, so why not use his own tent?

    There’s a slight difference though. By “been to several camps and supplied his own [pop up] tent” I assume you mean they drove to a site (or were dropped there) and set up camp. The leaders have a variety of contingencies available if someone has appeared with crap gear, of forgot (or breaks) their poles, or any other catastrophe likely to befall a teenager. Traditional “scout” [aka Patrol] type tents can always squeeze another body in – not so easy with lightweight tents. If everyone is carrying their kit on a hike you can’t really afford to take loads of spare kit with you – so there is a benefit to everyone having matching tents with interchangeable parts, you want robust kit that isn’t going to leave you with shivering whinging teenagers, and that you aren’t going to be sending home to a parent in tatters (the same applies to stoves, pans, etc). Often its more efficient (weight and warmth) to share 2-3 people in small tents than go for individuals. Its a practice the Scouts generally encourage (and splitting food, stoves, fuel etc between the same small group) often helps with reducing the amount of baggage/weight, as well as building the group/team.

    Its not necessarily “an issue” its just unusual. Even if their own “troop” is not well resourced they can often borrow kit from a neighbouring group. It wouldn’t be unusual for a teenager to be wanting some sparkly new kit when its not essential. If he wants to have his own kit a better rucksack, sleeping bag or mattress might be money better spent? Of course if he will be camping outside Scouts then it can be a good investment.

    If you are going down this route my two suggestions would be:

    1. You want a flysheet first erection. You aren’t going to have the luxury of only picking ideal weather conditions to go camping and so getting the tent up dry is a huge plus.
    2. Make sure the ground sheet is reasonably tough. A teenager isn’t going to be as thorough in removing potential damage sources as the person who has to pay for the repair/replacement!

    Premier Icon bigyinn
    Free Member

    He’s not particularly materialistic in respect of camping kit, he’s only 12, but it was advised by his leader that a better tent would serve him better than the current one. Its not my son who’s driving the kit aquisition, its his leader. I know he’ll look after his kit well, because he always does. AFAIK his troop prefer to have the scouts supply their own tents and kit.

    Thanks for the pointers. I presume flysheet refers to the outer shell of the tent?

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Full Member

    bigyinn

    Member
    Some of those Vango ones look reasonable.
    Anyone got experience of the Alpha 200 / 300 or the Gamma 200 / 300?

    I’ve had an Alpha 200 for a few years now & it’s served me well enough. Been through some typical UK weather & held out fine & if you put it up (for the first time) in the dry you can collapse it with the inner & fly as one so it’s less of an issue putting it up in the rain.

    There are much better tents out there but it’s been good value IMHO

    Premier Icon johnners
    Free Member

    I’ve got a Vango Banshee 200, that’d be worth a look IMO. Ostensibly a 2 man tent but I wouldn’t even like to try TBH, though it’s fine for 1 + kit. Whether it’d be good enough for 2 youngsters would depend on them. It pitches pretty quickly flysheet first or all-in-one, is sturdy and has proven good in some fairly heinous weather. It’s not all that light at about 2.4kg so not really ideal for a 12 year old backpacking but you can pick one up for around the £110 mark.
    As globalti says above though, second hand is your best bet for something actually light and within budget.

    Premier Icon nuke
    Full Member

    Hoolie 2 , normally on sale around £120.00 . We’ve got one and its grest for the money.

    ^^^this. My son & i have used it for wild camping and he has used it for DoE expeditions…very good little tent (Teachers on DoE commented how good it was for the job)

    Premier Icon BadlyWiredDog
    Full Member

    Thanks for the pointers. I presume flysheet refers to the outer shell of the tent?

    Yep. In a perfect, UK-friendly world you choose a tent that pitches altogether, with the inner and outer (fly) already connected. That way the inner tent doesn’t get wet if you have set up camp in the rain. Fly first is also reasonable, but more fiddly. Inner first less good, though it’s not the end of the world if you’re quick.

    ps: that Hoolie 2 weighs around 2.5kg which is fine shared between two, but heavy as for a 12-year-old kid to carry on his own. It’s about the same as my old Macpac Minaret, which I occasionally use solo. I’m a little unsure whether he’s got to carry the entire tent himself or if he’ll be sharing the load with another scout?

    Premier Icon theboyneeds
    Free Member

    Actually… https://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/p/wild-country-tents-zephyros-2-ep-tent-D1314001.html

    I got one of these. Very good. Can be pitched without liner too for under 1kg if needed.

    Premier Icon rapidrob95
    Free Member

    +1 for the zephyros 2 from me too. Used for both hill walking and cycle touring (wild camping for both). End poles can be taken out to make packing up easier.

    Premier Icon andylc
    Free Member

    Terra-Nova or Wild Country tents are both excellent quality, the latter being slightly cheaper, if he’s carrying it solo then ideally wants to be 2kg or less, as mentioned before ones that pitch outer first are easier in wet conditions. Zephyros 2 looks a good value light option, I have a slightly larger Wild Country tent which I think is excellent quality and value for money.

    Premier Icon Spin
    Free Member

    Terra-Nova or Wild Country tents are both excellent quality

    They have gone right downhill in the last few years I know plenty of folks that won’t have another tent from them myself included. Poor quality and appalling customer service.

    Premier Icon andylc
    Free Member

    I have heard people griping about poor quality but I don’t see it myself having bought one fairly recently and used it for wild camping several times, great design that fits the 3 of us + dog and equipment, very light for the size and everything seems to be well made. Not sure what has apparently gone downhill having not had one before. Unless you shell out silly money on a Hilleberg or whatever, then what other reasonable value half decent options are there? Vango tents I looked at seemed pretty dodgy quality to me. Maybe Vaude but I didn’t like their designs much when I looked.

    Premier Icon Spin
    Free Member

    The issues I have seen are poles snapping and seams parting after a few uses followed by WC/TN claiming it was fair wear and tear and asking for payment to repair. I personally returned 4 tents to them before giving up and going with another manufacturer. There are heaps of tent manufacturers to choose from!

    Premier Icon matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    As someone who had a store of 35+ tents for group use, and still in charge of a dozen or so for BB’s DofE expedition, Vango all the way.
    Value wise you won’t beat them.
    Design wise they are functional and practical, few duff designs.
    Wild Country / Terra Nova just haven’t stood the test of dufus teens as well as Vango – plus the warranty back up and attitude of Vango is much better than TN/WC.

    I really rate the Halo – vertical sides, bomber in bad weather, two doors, simple pitch. Heavier than some.

    The tunnels (Scafell, Tempest etc) just work, only thing being getting them end on to wind (as with any tunnel tent).

    Banshee is ace, if ‘snug’.

    Premier Icon sv
    Full Member

    +1 for the Vangos use them for our BB DofE stuff and company yearly camp.

    Premier Icon Saccades
    Free Member

    Argos vango samba and a vango tarp.

    Under budget, not heavy and practical as the tarp gives a large living space or can be used to cover the tent in really shit weather.

    Premier Icon ransos
    Free Member

    +1 for Vango. I have the Nevis 300 and it’s great for the money. A roomy two man or cosy three.

    Premier Icon chrisdw
    Free Member

    My scount camps when i was a kid all used the big green canvas ridge tents. Any troops still using those?

    Premier Icon poly
    Free Member

    My scount camps when i was a kid all used the big green canvas ridge tents. Any troops still using those?

    They certainly are, but not when hiking.

    Premier Icon fatbikedog
    Full Member

    Vaguely related comment from an old man. My vango force 10 ridge tent is 44 years old and I still use it.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 41 total)

The topic ‘Small tent advice’ is closed to new replies.