Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
  • Sleeping bag liners
  • whytetrash
    Full Member

    Doing Calder Valley way in a couple of weeks bike packing… current sleeping bag isn’t the warmest, berghaus intrepid 700 1-2 season. Don’t really want to spend a load on a new bag so was thinking of a thermal liner… any recommendations please? Some reviews say they make little difference! What’s the consensus? Use an Alpkit cloudbase mat with it …. if they are pointless any deals on good sleeping bags would be great cheers folks

    footflaps
    Full Member

    They make a very small difference – I’d just wear thermals in the sleeping bag which would make a bigger difference. Plus drape whatever jacket you have over the bag for some extra insulation.

    matt_outandabout
    Full Member

    ^ that’s been my approach too. Wear warm stuff, good socks, hat and perhaps a water bottle. I find that having a small square of reflective material (old emergency foil blanket) and additional foam mat really boosts warmth.

    I also think a lot of people pitch tents in cold hollows, windy spots etc. Tucking up next to trees / wall / dry ground etc can also boost warmth

    shermer75
    Free Member

    Yep, same as above, layer up like an onion. I wore my down jacket in my sleeping bag at the weekend, which really helped.
    In the past I have put my sleeping bag inside a bivvy bag, because I had it with me, that also helped, but it’s a bulky solution tho.

    Mugboo
    Full Member

    I bought a Nodpod for this purpose, no idea how much warmth it added but it seemed a better idea to wash this than my sleeping bag.

    Spin
    Free Member

    A hot water bottle makes a massive difference. I fill a 500ml pop bottle with hot water,tuck it in a sock and put it in the bag for a few minutes before I get in.

    footflaps
    Full Member

    Also, the biggest different is how well you’ve eaten the night before – a nice hearty meal makes a huge difference!

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Dont forget to run a bit before you go to bed. All the heat generated lofts the sleeping bag. Going to bed when cold is a guaranteed way to have a cold night

    supernova
    Full Member

    tjagain
    Full Member
    Dont forget to run a bit before you go to bed. All the heat generated lofts the sleeping bag. Going to bed when cold is a guaranteed way to have a cold night

    This. Although I recommend press-ups rather than going for a run in your sleeping clothes!

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Cripes, why don’t you lot just buy decent sleeping bags?

    ( I know why the OP doesn’t, but surely the rest of you would be more comfortable in a bag designed für the temperature you’re in)

    tjagain
    Full Member

    I have a high quality o defrees rated one

    Spin
    Free Member

    Cripes, why don’t you lot just buy decent sleeping bags?

    Why buy a new bag for many many pounds for conditions you only go out in once or twice a year? Far more sensible to find a work around with your current kit.

    jamiemcf
    Full Member

    I have a silk one which I feel is adequate, socks are my key, warm feet help loads.

    My missus bought a fleece one which she likes but I’ve found way to hot.

    defblade
    Free Member

    I’ve layered in sleeping bags for years. I have a fairly thin bag, and 2 liners – one soft and thin, one a bit thicker – mix and match as required. For a lot of the time, as I don’t camp in the cold so much any more (and I’ve got a much warmer bag for when I do), I’m in the thinner liner and using the sleeping bag proper as a duvet.
    Layering works for clothes – why wouldn’t it work for sleeping bags? Wearing clothes to bed is basically the same thing anyway… but much less comfy, IMO.

    rootes1
    Full Member

    I use one of these (long version as tall) it is a thin micro grid fleece and does add noticeable warmth to a bag and packs small.

    https://www.trekitt.co.uk/sleep-shelter/sleeping-bag-accessories/mountain-equipment-ultratherm-sleeping-bag-liner-regular__48427

    dyna-ti
    Full Member

    A hot water bottle makes a massive difference. I fill a 500ml pop bottle with hot water,tuck it in a sock and put it in the bag for a few minutes before I get in.

    Air activated heat pads 😉 One at the bottom for your feet – really important the old tootsies. one about the knees and one close to your face. Plus they stick on to the inside of the bag and dont migrate anywhere.

    Over the course of the night they’ll remain warm, unlike any hot water bottle.

    thegeneralist
    Full Member

    Why buy a new bag for many many pounds for conditions you only go out in once or twice a year? Far more sensible to find a work around with your current kit.

    Indeed, but I got the distinct impression that you tj and Moab go out in cool conditions far more than twice a year, and indeed over a huge number of years, and thus it would be worthwhile ( footflaps I have no idea about)

    I guess I am wrong

    whytetrash
    Full Member

    Thanks for the advice folks! Regards a better sleeping bag, I’ve actually got about 6 and can cope with any conditions… but only one is anything like compact enough for bike packing 🙄

    TheBrick
    Free Member

    I be only used polycotton or silk and they don’t add a lot to the warmth but their real advantage for @dirtbaglife (TM) is easy to remove and wash.

    shermer75
    Free Member

    Going to bed when cold is a guaranteed way to have a cold night

    So true!

    butcher
    Full Member

    For bikepacking the usual means of keeping warm would be to use whatever you’ve got. A down jacket can double the warmth of a light bag. Add a fleece and you’ll be toasty. Decent insulated mat will help too.

    damascus
    Free Member

    I bought one of these years ago, it’s amazing. Weighs 200g

    https://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/practical/XA107.html

    It is just a sheet, I used the sewing machine to make it a sleeping bag, top 3rd has a zip.

    I put my sleeping bag inside this if it’s going to be cold. No issues with condensation etc.

    I even think I could sleep in just that in warmer weather.

    The alpkit cloudbase mat is light but only has an r rating of 1.4. My exped synmat has an r rating of 4 and the winter one around 7. You will lose a lot of heat through the mat.

    What’s the weather forecast for when your going?

    simster
    Full Member

    if its only for a night you’ll manage, but youll be cold.
    my bivvying trick is to pack those self heating hand warmers. they take up no space and if you put 2 or 3 in the bag they make a big difference.

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)

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