• This topic has 19 replies, 16 voices, and was last updated 1 year ago by tonyd.
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  • Sleeping Bag, Liner, and Bivi bag. How to get in & out?
  • james-rennie
    Full Member

    As per title, I use a sleeping bag, sleeping bag liner, and (zipless alpkit) bivi bag.
    When I’m struggling to get in or out I think to myself ‘there must be a proper way to do this’ but I’ve always been too embarrassed to ask. (a bit like like the woody allen film “everything you ever wanted to know about bivi but were afraid to ask”)
    I generally stand my feet in all three then pull the whole thing up to chest or shoulders, then try to sit down without falling over or ripping anything, then wriggle the the last bit up over shoulders.
    For getting out I do a kind of inchworm slither.
    How the hell am I supposed to do it??

    scud
    Free Member

    Does help when bivvy has wider opening (i use a Rab Superlight bivvy bag), but tend to sit in front of bivvy and place feet into sleeping bag, and pull it up so feet go to bottom of sleeping bag, then repeat with bivvy bag, so place you and sleeping bag into bivvy and pull up..

    3
    thisisnotaspoon
    Free Member

    I chuck the sleeping bag into the bivi, stand on the bag liner (which is made of the same slippery fabric as a Tory ministers shoulder pads) on the hood of the bag, then slide into the bag.

    I plan to resolve this at some point by getting a quilt and a tent.

    1
    scotroutes
    Full Member

    Liner bags are the work of the devil. Why are you using one? If it’s for added warmth or to keep the bag clean then consider wearing a base layer instead. If that’s not warm enough then just wear thicker clothing.

    (Ex liner bag user)

    5
    nickc
    Full Member

    make a film of yourself getting in and out of the line/bag/combo* and we’ll give you tips.

    * for science, you understand, not solely for our amusement, not at all for that…for science.

    ThePinkster
    Full Member

    which is made of the same slippery fabric as a Tory ministers shoulder pads

    Absolutely nothing to add to the discussion but had a genuine chuckle at that.

    james-rennie
    Full Member

    @scotroutes, I’m inclined to agree about bag liners being awful – I don’t know how it wraps arounds like a boa constrictor during the night whilst everything else appears untouched.

    @TINAS I do have a little tent, but it’s not little enough and is a bugger to carry campared to the bivi bag. On the other hand it does stop mozzies and midges eating my face and neck.

    thisisnotaspoon
    Free Member

    Liner bags are the work of the devil. Why are you using one? If it’s for added warmth or to keep the bag clean

    Pretty much those two reasons?

    @TINAS I do have a little tent, but it’s not little enough and is a bugger to carry campared to the bivi bag. On the other hand it does stop mozzies and midges eating my face and neck.

    Yea, I’m looking at those Naturehike Cloud-UP tents from China to replace my £30 Gellert Solo which is nicer than abivi, but too small to get changed in. Bivi’s are great, but I’ve been caught out with 24h rain where everything is soaked through, and there’s zero chance of getting into a bivi clean and dry (and then staying dry is doubtful). On balance I’m coming round to the idea that I’d forego some other ‘luxury’ in favor of a proper tent if space was an issue.

    chvck
    Free Member

    I use a quilt in my bivi bag. I also sliced the bag open and added a waterproof zip.

    1
    jameso
    Full Member

    Put the liner in the bag, put the bag in the bivi. Shake it a bit holding the top bit of each in one hand and it’ll all line up ok. Then assuming you’re sitting around where you’re about to sleep, you have it a bit scrunched up and just put your feet down to the end then pull it up and over you while lying down, doing a bit of an arch sort of yoga pose for a mo to pull it up? How hard can it be : )

    jhinwxm
    Free Member

    Yeah ditch the liner. Pain in the ass and not needed.

    mattsccm
    Free Member

    Bin the liner unless you are sleeping there multiple nights a week, every week. Wear a thicker vest. Sove bag inside bag a bit and wriggle in.

    shermer75
    Free Member

    I also have the an Alpkit bivvy bag (Hunka XL) and, to be honest, I don’t think there is an easy way. I have got marginally better at it, but I don’t think there’s an easy way. I couldn’t imagine trying to get in with a bag liner as well! If you’re already thinking about ditching it, then maybe now is the time…

    spooky_b329
    Full Member

    Same struggle here. I used to get twisted up in the bag liner but it was the stand as YHA style so cotton and square. I changed to a mummy shaped liner that’s more slippery and now I don’t notice it at all.

    Re getting out of the Hunka XL, especially when the tarp is covered in condensation and the grass is wet, is a pain. I’m torn between getting a hooped bivvy, or the Tyvek bivvy bag with chest zip sold by wierdos on bikes

    scotroutes
    Full Member

    I have a hooped bivi and it’s not much different when getting out. I often use a micro-tarp with a bivvy bag and that does help as you at least have somewhere dry to park your bum while you slide the bivvy bag down and off your legs a bit. I tend to do left foot out – into shoe – swing right foot out – into shoe – stand up. I guess there’s also the question of whether your mat is inside or outside the bivvy bag. If it’s outside then you also have somewhere dry to sit while you extricate yourself.

    jamiemcf
    Full Member

    I always find a liner slips down halfway through the night then I push it down to my feet and sleep gappily

    db
    Free Member

    Liner, bag and bivi. Lie back legs in air. Legs down, arch back slide all three under bum. Sit up and pull them up round shoulders. Snuggle up and get some kip.

    1
    shermer75
    Free Member

    or the Tyvek bivvy bag with chest zip sold by wierdos on bikes

    I’ve just ordered that, I’ll let you know how I get on!

    B.A.Nana
    Free Member

    same as scotroutes, sleeping bag and baselayers, either tomorrows clean/dry or if weight isn’t that critical, take specific night stuff ie longjohns (about the same weight as a liner). Also I prefer a lightweight sleeping bag with a light duvet jacket rather than just a heavier sleeping bag, much more versatile around camp and sat up cooking

    tonyd
    Full Member

    I have the same problem OP, but without the liner. Struggle to get in, spend all night feeling claustrophobic, can’t get up in the night for a wee, then struggle to get out in the morning. Last summer I almost ended up in the River Wye as I was tossing and turning so much that I almost wriggled into the river!

    Refuse to give up though.

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