Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)
  • Singlespeeding
  • Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    Is there any difference between an (inexpensive) SS chainset and simply removing the inner and outer ring from a triple?

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
    Subscriber

    No

    Premier Icon Yak
    Subscriber

    A dedicated stainless steel ss chainring will last much longer than the one that came on the triple. Other than that, nothing.

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
    Subscriber

    Oh yeah, I’d swap the middle ring for a proper ss one. Missed that bit.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    So it’s worth replacing the ring but keeping the cranks.

    The other thing I’ve noticed about the rear sprockets for converting freehubs is that some of them are a single sprocket with no way of spreading the load on the freehub. That’s going to eat through the teeth on my freehub body in no time.

    Are there any that spread the load better? I found a Campag one but that’s no use to me obvs.

    Premier Icon kayak23
    Subscriber

    Shirley chain retention is better with a non-ramped ring?

    Premier Icon Yak
    Subscriber

    Use a wide base stainless cog like a surly or a velosolo stainless.

    Whilst we are at it – also use lots of thin spacers to get the chainline right. 2 big ones are rarely spot on. Also a decent 3/32 chain like a KMC Z610 HX. Job’s a good’un then and have fun. πŸ™‚

    kayla1
    Member

    Skinny cogs are fine on a steel freehub and you can use a narrow wide or any 1x chainring, you don’t need to buy a ‘singlespeed’ one. I use Gusset chromoly cogs on my bike (ally freehub) when I swap it over to SS for gloopy wintery misery but have a skinny stainless one on my spare (steel freehub) wheels.

    On one do a ss rear sprocket that spreads the load a bit. Groove armada?

    Premier Icon nedrapier
    Subscriber

    Yeah, gusset and On One Groove Armada are both good wide base sprockets. Gusset for silver, GA for black.

    At other end of the price spectrum, you have Endless, Boone and Niner.

    CraigW
    Member

    For a triple chainset, you can put as bashguard in place of the outer ring.

    drofluf
    Member

    I’ve got a lightly used wide based 16T that you can have. Email in profile

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    Would need to be 20t really, I am a fat bastard.

    Started thinking about it because at the weekend a dodgy jockey wheel caused the chain to jam and rip the much off the hanger at the bottom of the Blorenge. Tried to continue the ride SS, being able to use alternator dropouts, but it still wanted to shift and had to abandon.

    The climb was interesting, felt like more of a body workout, however having such a low gear on the flats and downs was very frustrating.

    Premier Icon brassneck
    Subscriber

    32- 20 will be very spinny on the downs and flats. I’m not fit but have ridden everything round here (North Wessex Downs) on 32-18 – doubt I would every time, but that’s bearable on the flats. Going traditional 32:16 and resigning myself to pushing a bit more this winter, but I’m not riding with anybody much so it’s not a problem.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    29er doesn’t help.

    It’s steep where I live, which reveals the basic issue with singlespeeding. To have a chance of doing a reasonable portion of my climbs I’d have to reduce my flat riding to a trundle. If I were to do it, it would have to be for training only.

    The climb was interesting, felt like more of a body workout, however having such a low gear on the flats and downs was very frustrating.

    You’ll always be in the wrong gear.

    Have fun! πŸ˜‰

    joshvegas
    Member

    The only times i cant get up hills on a 32×16 26er are when its faster to walk anyway.

    The most irritating is a long gentle climb just steep enough to require effort. And the flat bits are for taking in the scenery.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    It might be faster to walk but I’m not out to save time! A lot of my hills would be impossible for me on SS but a good challenge geared. So I’d lose many of those challenges, but gain new ones where I’d be limited by effort. Like I say, training benefit only for me. I still think it’s daft for normal riding πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon brassneck
    Subscriber

    29er doesn’t help.

    Ah, as you were πŸ™‚

    kayla1
    Member

    It depends on what your ‘normal’ riding is though, and your personal idea of fun, doesn’t it? πŸ˜‰

    People in ‘liking different stuff’ shocker!

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    Exactly, that’s my whole point.

    My personal opinion is that it’s daft for normal riding, yours might be different πŸ™‚

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    molgrips – Member
    Is there any difference between an (inexpensive) SS chainset and simply removing the inner and outer ring from a triple?

    Yes. The continued function of your testicles versus their ability to glow in the dark.

    Derailleur cogs are designed to allow the chain to slip easily off and onto the next cog. They have got better and better at it over the years, especially with the latest chains which are really laterally flexible.

    To counter this it is essential to have perfect tension, but even that may not save the family jewels.

    When you’re honking up a hill your chainstay tends to flex sideways so now you have the 2 cogs out of line.

    Then two things happen.

    The first is you have a situation that Shimano et al have spent millions to achieve. The chain glides neatly off the cogs.

    Immediately followed by the second which is a TTTIE* with the above mentioned results.

    Fit proper singlespeed cogs and chain. πŸ™‚

    *Top Tube Testicle Interface Event

    kerley
    Member

    I have found the widest base cogs to be Gusset Double Six at 7mm wide. Good range of sizes, wear well and fairly cheap at around Β£12
    Useful if running on a alu freehub.

    To counter this it is essential to have perfect tension,

    and just as important, a perfect chain line!

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Member

    The first is you have a situation that Shimano et al have spent millions to achieve. The chain glides neatly off the cogs.

    That’s what happened at the weekend..

    Ok so I can keep the same cranks but get a new chainring. Fair enough.

    Having said that about the freehub body, I think on my 29er wheels it might actually be steel.

    shermer75
    Member

    If your chain line is good the chain does not come off πŸ™‚

    Shimano Acera is square taper and uses steel chain rings. And is cheap. Lovely! πŸ™‚

    teamslug
    Member

    I’ve gone ss for the first time about 2 months ago. Brand new wheels with ally freehub. Gusset double six 16 tooth cog with 2 wide spacers. No marking to freehub yet. Using a thick thin front ring with a 9 speed chain and no chain drop .
    With regard to gearing I’m on 56 gear inches ( 32×16) on a 29er. It’s bit spinny on the flat, max out at 16mph, but I can climb a lot more than I thought I’d be able to with my skinny chicken legs.

    Premier Icon epicyclo
    Subscriber

    molgrips – Member
    …Ok so I can keep the same cranks but get a new chainring. Fair enough…

    If it’s still available the On-One stainless chainring is a ripper. Mine has done several ‘Puffers and is still good (as well as all the other mucky riding I do on my bog bike).

    The same applies to the On-One Armada rear cogs.

    The price is good. I stocked up on them ages ago but haven’t managed to wear one out yet. πŸ™‚

    shermer75 – Member
    If your chain line is good the chain does not come off…

    That’s true until the chainstay flexes sideways… πŸ™‚

    Some bikes are better than others in that regard.

    If you bend the cranks and/or rip the wheel out the dropout you’ll know you’re making progress.

Viewing 29 posts - 1 through 29 (of 29 total)

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