Running shoes

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  • Running shoes
  • juan
    Member

    A quick question about running shoes. I hate running I really do .
    However I just bought a pair, just in case one day I must run with the SO.
    The question is I bought a pair of road shoes, the girl in the shop told me that for “gravel and light singletrack” they are going to be ok.
    I ask about off road shoes and she told me that they are not good for road and “gravel and light singletrack” because cushioning is too hard.
    Should I keep my road shoes or go for the off road ones or am I going to kill my knees the few times I am going to run?

    Pieface
    Member

    Well you can run anywhere in anything, however my thoughts are –

    1) What sort of running are you going to be doing? Is it going to be properly mixed or more off-road?
    2) There are loads of ‘do it all’ shoes that have a grippier sole and firmer cushioning but will cope with a bit of road. Good examples are Adidas Kanadia, Brooks Cascadia, Mizuno Wave ascend, Asics Fuji Gel’s to name a few. Saucony have a good heritage in these styles of mixed shoes. Even the Nike Pegasus is OK grip-wise.
    3) Trail shoes tend to have lower profile and firmer cushioning as otherwise they wallow around too much on the uneven surfaces and your feet don’t feel connected to the sole properly.
    4) Out and out fell shoes tend to have minimal cushioning for 2 reasons – 1 its not required as much as your not running on tarmac – 2 off-road requires full sensitivity of whats going on and full foot control – you can’t achieve this with an inch of spongy foam under your foot.
    5) You will get mixed information about the need for cushioning. Personally I like a bit of cushioning in my road shoes but I prefer something low profile and firm as I like to know whats going on under my feet. When off-road I usually use proper fell shoes but I also have a pair of Mizuno wave Harriers for when I do runs with more road on.

    It doesn’t sound to me like you went to a particularly good running shop. If the shoes are unused I’d take them back and ask for a refund and then get some ‘Trail’ shoes as they’re far more versatile, however be aware some are real horrors and are massively overbuilt, they’re more like hiking shoes than running shoes (Salomon XA Pro 3s for instance).

    Premier Icon mogrim
    Subscriber

    some are real horrors and are massively overbuilt, they’re more like hiking shoes than running shoes (Salomon XA Pro 3s for instance).

    They’re usually the ultra shoes, though – with a decent foot plate to stop the rocks etc killing your feet when you hit seriously long distances. Fully agree they’re overkill for the running Juan’s talking about.

    IMO unless you’re actually doing a “proper” mountain trail run (ie lots of loose rock/stone, serious inclines where you need to walk up, etc) normal road shoes are fine.

    juan
    Member

    Hi Pieface cheers
    the trails I intend to run on have almost zero rocks. It’s forest trails and fire road. I intend to run as little as possible to be honest as I just don’t like it. But sometimes you have to do what you have to do. The shoes are mainly going to be used as after bike shoes so to say.
    It is just that I feel like the off road shoes have a better lacing system.
    But you’re right about the shop being bad it’s a decathlon, I went for the most convenient.

    Premier Icon mogrim
    Subscriber

    But you’re right about the shop being bad it’s a decathlon, I went for the most convenient.

    Decathlon’s fine if you know what you’re looking for, but not if you want specialist advice.

    It is just that I feel like the off road shoes have a better lacing system.

    Try lacing them up a different way – there are loads of ways of lacing running shoes, some of which give more support than others. I tend to use the “loop lacing lock”:

    Pieface
    Member

    IN dry weather you’ll be fine, its just once it gets wet there’ll be bits that will become slidey, also fire roads have enough instability to make a traditional road shoe wallowy.

    FWIW my road shoes are minimal racing shoes (Mizuno Wave Ronin) and have minimal grip but so far have been ok running across wet fields, along the odd path / muddy bit through the winter.

    Once you’re used to how the shoe behaves (a bit like MTB tyres) then you’ll be fine, but if its really bugging you change them, I’m sure Decathlon will do some trail running shoes.

    Premier Icon DezB
    Subscriber

    Hey Juan, your English is good lately! 🙂

    juan
    Member

    Dezb, thanks, I appreciate it. As for the shoes I’ll go and try the trail ones tomorrow. They might not give me more support, I can only know that if i try them. Thanks for all the info, not looking to spend a silly amount of money on running shoes, I just want to have a pair in the wardrobe. Just in case. Iwill let you know.

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