Running Myths Exploded.

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  • Running Myths Exploded.
  • deadlydarcy
    Member

    Just a “final” (I hope) note on big races versus small local races…

    When I see these events, whichever the size, I’m just happy that people are out doing stuff and not sat at home watching tv and eating shite. I think the “big” events are good for people who are starting out as the publicity, and maybe the opportunity to raise some money encourages them to have a go. It’s unlikely that a beginner would enter something run by the local running club as he or she may well feel intimidated by “club-runners” even though there may be no reason to feel that way.

    If people are out running, be it on fells, tarmac, trails or beaches, be it with thousands of others or a few hundred, then the world is a better place for it.

    glupton1976
    Member

    Molgrips earlier:

    Aristotle
    Member

    Molgrips problem with racing may be that he gets stuck, waiting for the people in the overtaking queue to pass each other.

    alaslas
    Member

    Do running-related threads like this end up off topic because running is so moronically simple that there’s actually very little to discuss? It’s like the Guardian running blog – ‘How was your weekend’s running?’ – does anyone care?!

    One of the great joys of running is to be found in its terms of access – free to those with a willing body. No need to discuss or buy into technology if you don’t want to.

    Regarding the original video, I’m sure it suits the physio to claim his refutation of orthodoxy as original. But, really, as we’ve heard regarding stretching, it’s actually far more subjective than the brave doctor suggests.

    Aristotle
    Member

    Running may be simple on the face of it, but a lot of people have problems with it. It’s possibly not helped by being sedentary for most of the working day.

    surfer
    Member

    it’s actually far more subjective than the brave doctor suggests

    Is it? You mean it works for some and not others? I suspect the way people do it may differ but it either works or it doesnt.

    surfer
    Member

    running is so moronically simple that there’s actually very little to discuss?

    Maybe you could hop over to the famous “letsrun.com” they seem to find a lot to talk about.

    mogrim
    Member

    Just a “final” (I hope) note on big races versus small local races…

    When I see these events, whichever the size, I’m just happy that people are out doing stuff and not sat at home watching tv and eating shite. I think the “big” events are good for people who are starting out as the publicity, and maybe the opportunity to raise some money encourages them to have a go. It’s unlikely that a beginner would enter something run by the local running club as he or she may well feel intimidated by “club-runners” even though there may be no reason to feel that way.

    Of course, you can also be an experienced runner and enjoy these big events – while I generally prefer smaller races, there’s no denying the atmosphere at one of the big Madrid races is something special – the Marathon, or even better, the San Silvestre New Year’s Eve race. Perhaps they’re not the best races to set a PB (that goes for pretty much any race in Madrid, though!) but once in a while…

    alaslas
    Member

    Is it? You mean it works for some and not others? I suspect the way people do it may differ but it either works or it doesnt.

    Barefoot running either works or it doesn’t, or has some benefit, to give one example. That’s what I mean by subjective. Running as a practice is subjective to the practitioner, as are its effects, and, in injury, as are the diagnoses and remedies.

    The barefoot thing especially is a hilarious canard to the chattering forumites.

    surfer
    Member

    Alaslas you may want to re-read what you wrote.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Running is very simple. Running well is not always simple. You will improve with training of course, but for some people big improvements can be made by looking at technique.

    It is simply not true that everyone automatically knows how to run distance well.

    alaslas
    Member

    Mmmm, I think running’s over-complicated by these kinds of discussion. And the video doesn’t really help either. It’s not nearly as revolutionary as the man’s trying to make out and it’s probably unwise to take his opinion as gospel because he’s offering so little as a substitute for the ‘myths’ he purports to dispel.

    Having had running injuries in the past I’m actually quite glad I didn’t take the advice to see a physio because the problems generally resolved themselves along with a bit of self-care. I’m increasingly coming to the conclusion that physios have got quite the racket going on.

    Happy running!

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    How many people on here have tried running but hated it so given up? Quite a few I think.

    Aristotle
    Member

    The first 10 years are the worst.

    I found that, after the first few months, as an active teenager, running was great.

    It’s just a pity that I’ve had so many injuries and niggles over the years.

    20 years on, I still really enjoy it.

    colonel wax
    Member

    Happy to report that my normal cushioned running shoes midfoot/heel striked me around the Cardiff half marathon today 😉

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    I saw a bit of that as I drove overhead. How was it for you?

    alaslas
    Member

    Ha ha, good on you Mr Wax! Likewise with myself and the Great North.

    colonel wax
    Member

    It was pretty good actually ta. Good atmosphere, I enjoyed it.

    I didn’t run a great time (personal worst actually), but it was my first race as a diabetic insulin user, so pretty happy I didnt end up in a diabetic coma!

    glupton1976
    Member

    It’s not nearly as revolutionary as the man’s trying to make out and it’s probably unwise to take his opinion as gospel because he’s offering so little as a substitute for the ‘myths’ he purports to dispel.

    I would not agree that he’s trying to be revolutionary or trying to sell anything. I’d say that he’s merely trying to point out that a load of stuff that people are selling is utter nonsense. He’s a consultant in sports medicine, so pretty highly qualified.

    Having had running injuries in the past I’m actually quite glad I didn’t take the advice to see a physio because the problems generally resolved themselves along with a bit of self-care.

    Body in healing itself shocker…

    I’m increasingly coming to the conclusion that physios have got quite the racket going on.

    I’m guessing that you’ve never been seriously injured…

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