Running (advice for a 44yr old unfit bloke!)…

Home Forum Chat Forum Running (advice for a 44yr old unfit bloke!)…

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 55 total)
  • Running (advice for a 44yr old unfit bloke!)…
  • Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    As much as i’d like I’m just not getting enough time to ride my bike properly at the minute and can’t see this changing for the forseeable future.

    Now I want to keep fit(ish) and lose a few pounds and have thought of giving running a go as the faff-factor is so much less than cycling.

    Are there any good websites with ‘new runner’ advice sections? I’ve read bits about building up slowly which is sensible, but what is slowly – 1 mile, 1/2 a mile, 2 miles!? Walk fast for a bit, jog a bit etc., etc?

    And I’ve also been a cyclist for 20 odd years so my calf muscles aren’t the most flexible!

    davidjones15
    Member

    I’m no running expert, but this seems to be popular.
    http://www.c25k.com/
    EDIT: Again I’m not sure, but I think it’ll be the hamstrings that are the biggest problem.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
    Subscriber

    start off somewhere nice, you’re allowed to drive there.

    walk away from the ‘start’ for 10mins, run slowly back, if anything hurts, or it’s hard work, slow down, if it still hurts, walk.

    see how you feel the next day.

    build up your speed/distance slowly.

    Premier Icon Moe
    Subscriber

    Run/walk is a good start from scratch, cycling will have given you a base fitness but apart from that running will be a whole new beast!

    Lot’s of help here:

    Runnersworld

    and here:

    Fetch Everyone

    Good local running club will also be helpful if it fits time.

    Premier Icon wwaswas
    Subscriber

    Don’t go to your local Park Run Saturday 5k timetrial not having run for 5 years and see how fast you can get round.

    I just used my hrm to stay below what I knew was my critical point (160bpm) and went for it.

    Did it in 25 minutes which I was quite proud of.

    I had to go upstairs backwards for a few days afterwards and my children kept laughing at me when I tried to stand up or move anywhere quickly.

    1) buy running shoes, preferably ones that fit. Running shops have all sorts of fancy gizmoz for this, then sell you a pair of shoes at £80 RRP and a set of insoles for another £25. Sprots Direct (well the Bracknell one anyway) have a thing you stand on, it tells you whether you need shoes from the blue or the yellow section, and they’re all half the RRP. Either way they’re a million times better than ‘trainers’.

    2) I’m useless at sticking to ttraining plans so just went out for a run and logged it on strava to see how far I could go without it being uncomfortable, repeated it 3 times a week and added 10% each week untill I got bored and decided I’d rather ride the bike even if it is muddy and a faff.

    glupton1976
    Member

    I’ve just read through the couch to 5k programme and maybe it’s just me, but it seems as if it’s aimed at morbidly obese people.

    If I was in the-muffin-mans position I’d probably go for a gentle 2 or 3 mile jog, starting off slow and getting slower, then i’d try it again 3 or 4 days later and repeat until it got easier. I’d be focussing on not having too big a stride length and finding what pace I could maintain, and if I had to walk for a minute or two i’d do that. Running on soft surfaces would help with injury prevention.

    Calves and hamstrings will sort themselves out as your running fitness improves.

    One final point – the first few minutes of any run for a new runner hurts like hell – after a few minutes you will find a rhythm and it gets much easier.

    I’ve just read through the couch to 5k programme and maybe it’s just me, but it seems as if it’s aimed at morbidly obese people.

    I think the ‘couch’ bit gives it away, “potentially future Mrs Spoon’s” dad being the closest I can think to somene who actualy does no exercise. I’m not a fast walker but we went for a ramble over the NYM’s and even I got peeved off at the pace and ammount of complaining. I think most STW’ers probably have quite self selecting view of the overall population ( with MTBers at the top, other sports people below that, everyone else is fatties) where in reality it’s possible for people to be compeltely un-fit without being fat.

    I’ve got crap knees and pretty unfit and could manage 3 miles from the start. Probably wouldn’t do it every day though.

    Premier Icon cheese@4p
    Subscriber

    I’ve damaged my achilles tendons by overdoing the hills when starting up with running. I thought stretching pre run was a good idea but it isn’t if you are not fully warmed up. So go easy to start with.

    ski
    Member

    glupton1976 – Member

    I’ve just read through the couch to 5k programme and maybe it’s just me, but it seems as if it’s aimed at morbidly obese people.

    If I was in the-muffin-mans position I’d probably go for a gentle 2 or 3 mile jog, starting off slow and getting slower, then i’d try it again 3 or 4 days later and repeat until it got easier. I’d be focussing on not having too big a stride length and finding what pace I could maintain, and if I had to walk for a minute or two i’d do that. Running on soft surfaces would help with injury prevention.

    Calves and hamstrings will sort themselves out as your running fitness improves.

    One final point – the first few minutes of any run for a new runner hurts like hell – after a few minutes you will find a rhythm and it gets much easier.

    Good info glupton1976, I am pretty much like MuffinMan, 44, never got into running, even though I have enjoyed cycling, playing hockey for over 20 years.

    I find it hard to pace myself, I (think) always end up starting off too fast then burning out after half a mile to a mile?

    glupton1976
    Member

    In my view MTBers are nowhere near the top of the fitness league.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Yes – I suppose I should add I’m not completely unfit. I could still knock out a 25 mile MTB ride if I wanted (at a steady pace).

    I can just feel the weight creeping on, and I know that I need to ride 3 times a week to keep at a decent level of speed and fitness (that I am happy with), which I don’t have time for.

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Subscriber

    davidjones15 – Member
    I’m no running expert, but this seems to be popular.
    http://www.c25k.com/

    The couch to 5k plan worked for me & my knees are shot.

    glupton1976
    Member

    the-muffin-man – go out for a wee jog tonight and see how you get on then report back.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    I need to get some shoes first – I don’t think VANS count as running shoes!

    Premier Icon convert
    Subscriber

    Running is good value for time in terms of getting fit but if you are carrying more weight than you should it could well play havoc on your joints. Take it very steady in terms of quantity especially to start with and see if you can run on some softer ground to minimise the impact.

    Have you considered a turbo trainer – it might require a frontal lobotomy to endure the tedium.

    piemonster
    Member

    Get off road, and stay there.

    Vile tarmac filth, mud is the future

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Have you considered a turbo trainer – it might require a frontal lobotomy to endure the tedium.

    Yes – its buried at the back of the shed, and that’s where it will stay!!!

    I used to use it loads when I competed (years ago), but I couldn’t bring myself to use it now.

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    I’m about 1 1/2 stones overweight (5’10” and a few pounds under 14 stone).

    Mary Hinge
    Member

    Get yourself off to Decathlon for some Asics Blackhawk Gel trainers crica £30.

    Then do what Glupton1976 says.

    I started running at 45 years old as I couldn’t cycle due to an elbow op. Started with an easy jog round the block, about 5km. But real easy.

    Did that a couple of times a week for a few weeks, then add a km and repeat.

    Then you can start looking at increasing speed distance, as you will have got your body ready to train.

    glupton1976
    Member

    I fear that the internet may be about to explode – people are agreeing with me. 👿

    Get yourself off to Decathlon for some Asics Blackhawk Gel trainers crica £30.

    The problem with that is knowing whether you’re an under or over protonator (sp?) which is generaly related to whether you have high or low/collapsed arches, and that’s what dictates whether they will/wont be the right shoes for you. I got Nike Lunarons as I’ve got pretty normal arches, the missus got the equivelent for completely flat feet 9and hers are pink, mine are blue, stereotypical!). Mine look like relatively normal trainers (just very lightweight and spongy to save my poor knees), hers have all sorts of bits webbing and re-inforcement, which is why it’s important to get the right ones.

    Premier Icon Moe
    Subscriber

    Ref trainers, go to a reputable local running equipment retailer who is equipped for gait analysis (tread mill & video analysis software) get sorted with the right fitting and right type of shoe for you. It may cost but nat half as much as the pain and discomfort (not to mention physio bills) of getting injured.

    redted
    Member

    Once you get going and hopefully get into it,get on Strava. As an ex-racer you’ll probably appreciate the competetive element. I’m having a joust with somebody over this one mile segment on my lunchtime run and I find it really keeps it interesting and keeps you motivated. You daren’t not try. Felt like I was in the opening credits of Trainspotting today!! I’m missing not riding my bike as much at the moment but like you say, the lack of faffage for running is appealing and progress is relatively quick.

    glupton1976
    Member

    I disagree with the going and getting fancy trainers – just go and get some basic “neutral” running shoes. There is a good body of evidence to show that stability and motion control shoes lead to more injuries even in people who they are designed for.

    emsz
    Member

    Start SLOW lol

    Really really steady, don’t time yourself just go for a fast walk/ jog. Then run the walk/jog route, then run it faster. Find trainers that are comfy. Listen to your body

    Premier Icon Blackhound
    Subscriber

    Hi Tim, Used to run a lot until 20 years ago. Tried the couch to 5k thing a couple of times recently and got injured fairly early on even with ASICs or Nike shoes. Now trying to walk more.

    Get some decent shoes and give the C-2-5k thing a try, if it is to easy just skip a week – it gives sone structure if nothing else. Crich Chase or Shining Cliff are excellent places to run, try to keep off road if you can, much easier on those ageing legs;-)

    Dovedale Dash next year?

    missnotax
    Member

    My top tip is don’t forget to stretch – and be prepared to spend some money with the physio / chiropractor!

    After years of not really running but doing lots of cycling I trained for the Great South Run a few years ago (10 miles). It wasn’t far but I was amazed at the damamge I did to myself – my knees really suffered and it kept on messing up my hip joints. It was far more brutal than I expected!!

    druidh
    Member

    I started a little running last year to accompany Mrs Druidh on her “get fit for Everest Base Camp” campaign, this despite not having run since Secondary School (OK – were’re talking 38 years ago). I found I quite enjoyed it and my “cycling fitness” seemed to carry over. I just started with ordinary trainers but I’ve since bought a set of more “trail” oriented ones for running off-road.

    I started by dong a nice easy paced 2 miles or so but soon found I could knock in 6 miles with no ill-effects. I’m currently doing one decent run a week of that sort of distance. Time-wise that takes me less than an hour.

    I quite fancy some off-road duathlons next year, so I’m planning to do a couple of intermediate, shorter runs each week too.

    I had a look at the C25K thing and just couldn’t work out why anyone who cycles regularly would need to start at such a basic level.

    Mary Hinge
    Member

    glupton1976 – Member
    I disagree with the going and getting fancy trainers – just go and get some basic “neutral” running shoes. There is a good body of evidence to show that stability and motion control shoes lead to more injuries even in people who they are designed for.

    Going to agree with the internets again 🙄

    That’s what I mean by just buying some cheapish normal running trainers as a start point, before splashing loads of dosh.

    I went to a proper running shop and they sold me some trainers that gave me shin splints (and still do if I try them out for a change) so I have little faith.

    I now wear Brooks which I bought in the sales coz they felt comfy and fit nice, and all is now well, doing up to half mara and lots of tri’s and 10ks.

    The Asics I got were fine for getting me up and err…running.

    As it happens I’m now moving over to Newtons, but lets not go there.

    Get some comfy running shoes and go for some easy runs.

    Premier Icon Nobby
    Subscriber

    I had a look at the C25K thing and just couldn’t work out why anyone who cycles regularly would need to start at such a basic level.

    It eases the body/your joints into it, especially if you’re carrying some excess.

    Edit: The OP states he’s cycled for 20 years too so, without any other form of exercise, shortened quads are quite likely so will need time to adjust.

    Premier Icon Nobeerinthefridge
    Subscriber

    I wondered how long this thread would go on without the customary ‘gait’ and ‘pronation’ discussion. Actually, a wee bit longer than usual!.

    mulv1976
    Member

    I’ve damaged my achilles tendons by overdoing the hills when starting up with running. I thought stretching pre run was a good idea but it isn’t if you are not fully warmed up. So go easy to start with.

    Doing a fast paced 5 min walk to warm up is the best way to get the muscles moving. And the same after your run as a warm down. Then stretch quads, hamstrings, glutes and psoas (groin).

    Also – and this is not for everyone – I found that sitting in a very cold bath so it just covers the legs (even put a bit of ice in) for 10 mins after stretching reduced muscle inflammation massively. It worked wonders when I trained for a 10k.

    cynic-al
    Member

    I got into running at 41, started slow and gentle on sand, built it up, did a marathon 6 months later.

    One thing I’d say is I can’t burn nearly as many calories running, my body can’t take the pounding.

    TurnerGuy
    Member

    I am 48 and grudgingly run to keep fit – don’t really enjoy it though.

    You should mix walking/jogging for a while and then progress to jog/sprint.

    Interval type training like that is excellent for getting fitness up quickly and way better than just churning out the miles jogging. Beware of just grinding though ‘junk’ miles as it just wears you out for not much gain.

    It is better to be a little ‘springy’ in your stride than just plodding along. I find that if I don’t lift my feet/bend my knees as I run I get more knee ‘niggles’.

    When you are stronger do a few longer, endurance, runs at a constant pace.

    3bikeman
    Member

    I started running at 59 having not run since school – but am a regular cyclist.
    I bought a pair off road running shoes and started by jogging 2 miles every other day, within 6 months I ran the Grizzly Cub run a 9 mile off road race along the devon coast.
    I am 62 now and run twice a week about 7 miles.BUT always off road,through woods,along coast etc. I have done several 10k – 15k trail races this summer and usually come about halfway down the field.
    1. at first killed my legs but got easier
    2. I lost weight running
    3. cycling after running makes my legs ache, but running after cycling is ok???
    4. When I started running I just ran, not bothering with, walking/sprinting etc.
    5I really enjoy running off road particulalry good when the weather is naff and not nice to go MTBing or road cycling.
    Go for it short runs – bit of stretching when you get back – and run off road – ‘Trail Running ‘magazine is reasoneably inspirational – new one is due out now.
    ENJOY

    Premier Icon the-muffin-man
    Subscriber

    Just adding an update to this thread…

    Well I started with a few short runs in the new year – less than a mile, a couple of times a week. Gradually adding a few 100 yds each run.

    Doing 3 runs a week now and have now just come back from my first 2.5 mile run and felt pretty good, and have lost over 1/2st in 5 weeks.

    Strava tells me I’m now at 9.10mins/mile – down from 12.2mins/mile on my 1st run on 2nd Jan.

    …going well so far, and I’m enjoying the lack of faff!

    glupton1976
    Member

    Good man. Glad to hear that you’re progressing.

    stuartie_c
    Member

    Good to hear you’re enjoying it TMM.

    I’m in a similar boat – 44 (until tomorrow, anyway) and just started running before Xmas. I’m coming out of the niggling aches and pain stage (medial ligaments on R ankle were sore for a while but not bothering me now) and starting to see progress. I’m trying to mix up street and trail running and I’ll phase the bike in when I’m less of a Southern Jessie about the weather.

    I’ve got a great 6 mile trail circuit about 4 miles away and a fast 3.3 mile road circuit from the house. Pace is steadily improving but I’m more concerned about building stamina for long hill runs in the spring and summer. It’s crucial to build distance up gradually; I did 9 miles last Sunday in new shoes and suffered for it!

    Hope you keep progressing!

    Premier Icon Bregante
    Subscriber

    43 here and a svelte 15st 10 or thereabouts! I hate running on the road but have dabbled on and off over the last few years (max around 5 miles). I’ve just started running off road at the start of this year and so far I’m really enjoying it. Averaging 2 or 3 five mile runs a week and it’s nowhere near as harsh on the knees.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 55 total)

The topic ‘Running (advice for a 44yr old unfit bloke!)…’ is closed to new replies.