Runners: shinsplints = running shoes worn out?

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  • Runners: shinsplints = running shoes worn out?
  • Pieface
    Member

    I am aware of the theory, and have tried it out. For me its an aid to training.

    Very few of the people in my fell club run barefoot.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Fell shoes are much closer to being ‘minimal’ though anyway, aren’t they?

    Premier Icon stever
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    I wonder if just occasionally one of these topics might not revert to form with such grinding predictability? I will defend free speech to the last. Except in this case.

    Smiley, etc 😉

    Pieface
    Member

    Hence my earlier post about ‘Minimal’ as opposed to ‘Barefoot’. Basically I like a low heel dffernetial, maybe even zero, but I like to retain cushioning for the road, but as I don’t like squishy soles I go for something firm that fits well e.g. racing flats.

    My next road shoes are likely to be Saucony Kinvara 4’s, but this will need to be validated by how they feel on the treadmill / road and also advice from the specialist running shop, who sell only neutral running shoes.

    I need a bit of support in my shoes, barefoot shoes don’t have any. Whilst I’m aware that I can develop this, TBH its not something I’m that bothered about doing.

    Premier Icon nickc
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    My take on barefoot?

    If it works yay! If it doesn’t? Yay also. There are simply too many variables. Too many factors that we just don’t know.

    Running is nice, what you put on your feet is mostly no ones business but your own

    Premier Icon ahwiles
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    molgrips – Member

    Fell shoes are much closer to being ‘minimal’ though anyway, aren’t they?

    yes.

    thin soles offer precision on the rocks, but not a lot of cushioning. They’re usually very twisty/flexible too.

    try running/scrambling quickly over a big pile of rocks, try landing on your heels, it’s bloody horrible.

    (and if you’re landing on your toes, you really don’t need your shoes to bring much squish to the party – although a little might be nice)

    try running over rough ground* with a heel strike, see how far you get before you twist an ankle.

    (*a cow-trampled field will do)

    So regarding heel/mid/forefoot striking, what is the general thinking?

    I have a continual soft tissue injury indside both legs (predominantly the right, but does occur in the left too after continued running) that I have self-diagnosed as compartment syndrome. I have seen physios / bio-mechanics and podiatrists and wear orthotics, but have not shifted it since it appeared while doing basic training in the TA 12 years ago.

    I am a heavy heel striker, but am trying to shift to mid-foot striking after reading Chi Running, which makes a lot of sense to me. I also only run offroad – running on road brings on regular shinsplints very quickly.

    The one thing that has helped noticeably is wearing compression socks, both for running and recovery. It hasn’t stopped the injury occurring, but it has certainly reduced it and the healing process takes place a lot quicker.

    In terms of consistency, I have stopped, started gently and built up and stopped numerous times, and now tend to do about two miles once a week in the woods.

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Pieface, that’s basically what I wear.

    the specialist running shop, who sell only neutral running shoes.

    Interesting. This is part of the same debate really. The fad is about barefoot running but really the debate should be about support, and how much. Sounds like your shop has weighed in.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
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    Pimpmaster Jazz – Member

    So regarding heel/mid/forefoot striking, what is the general thinking?

    try something, you might like it?

    but give it a chance.

    (simply going for a 10k run in a new pair of vibram 5fingers, hoping to experience the nirvana of barefoot running is probably a bad idea, likely to end in disappointment, and crippling 3day DOMS…)

    Premier Icon nickc
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    So regarding heel/mid/forefoot striking, what is the general thinking?

    There isn’t one. That’s mostly the issue. I’ve read countless journals, magazine articles, read any number of books both for and against, and the grand sum of most of them say “dunno, might help, might not” there is simply too many other things going on that have an impact to tell whether running with one part of your foot over another hitting the ground first makes any sort of difference whatsoever.

    Any one who tells you different is trying to sell you something

    Pieface
    Member

    I just prefer the feel / responsiveness of minimal shoes, thats my main thing.

    The shop believe that you should deal with the route cause (posture / technique) rather than the symptom through structured shoes. Strangely though they are combined with a Physio’s to helpt you do this….

    But back to the OP, if you used to change the shoes at 500, why 700 now?

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    So regarding heel/mid/forefoot striking, what is the general thinking?

    Well heavy heel striking is generally considerd to be not a good idea, I think. I started to run on my forefoot one day and it was so obvioulsy so much better, I just trained myself to run that way. I then went looking for shoes with low or no heel.

    Your foot and calf is actually a complex shock absorber all on its own. If you wear minimal shoes you should become aware of how uncomfortable it is smashing your heels into the ground, and adapt your running to avoid this. In doing so, you’ll start to use your foot as a shock absorber.

    Some people don’t do this though, continue to smash their feet into the ground and then conclude that minimal shoes are rubbish.

    ‘Running light’ has always been the advice, and that’s all this really is.

    Pieface
    Member

    Altra have combined the fads and have brought out a very cushioned (and also less so) flat shoe.

    I like how they list ‘Zero drop’ as a technology 🙄

    (simply going for a 10k run in a new pair of vibram 5fingers, hoping to experience the nirvana of barefoot running is probably a bad idea, likely to end in disappointment, and 3day DOMS…)

    😆

    Well heavy heel striking is generally considerd to be not a good idea, I think.

    That was my understanding too – the idea of transmitting shock straight into the calves (and my injured area) seemed plain daft, but then I was also advised not to try and alter my running style too much as it’s something we’ve done since childhood, so should be fairly sorted.

    I’ll continue with it (I am aware my posture isn’t great too, so try and concentrate on that as well) and see how it goes.

    Apologies for the hijack OP. 😉

    Premier Icon nickc
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    Well heavy heel striking is generally considerd to be not a good idea, I think.

    There’s evidence that says heel striking makes no difference, there’s evidence that says heavy forefoot striking is just as bad, there’s evidence that how hard you hit the ground may or may not make any difference at all.

    Try lots of things, don’t worry about it, stop if it hurts

    IanMunro
    Member

    The fad is about barefoot running but really the debate should be about support, and how much.

    I genuinely don’t really understand what people mean by a shoe providing ‘support’. Could anyone elucidate?

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    I was also advised not to try and alter my running style too much as it’s something we’ve done since childhood, so should be fairly sorted

    The idea that we should have naturally found the ideal running style as kids is nonsense. I was one of the fittest strongest kids in my year all the way through school, but always really bad at distance running. I simply hated it and never did it. When I tried to change this I bought some cushioned shoes and went out heel striking because the cushioned heel allowed me to do it. And I stayed crap. I knew that running barefoot needed a different style, but I never had the opportunity to run a long distance barefoot because to run you put on running shoes. And running shoes had thick cushy heels. My problem was striking too far out in front and braking myself each time. Forcing a mid or forefoot strike made me stop doing this, which is why it helped so much.

    Ian: support holds your foot in a particular position and cradles the instep. More support pushed up your instep more.

    EDIT what awhiles says.

    Premier Icon ahwiles
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    IanMunro – Member

    I genuinely don’t really understand what people mean by a shoe providing ‘support’. Could anyone elucidate?

    it’s a word used to mean lots of things.

    sometimes it means a shoe that is stiff – the sole doesn’t flex much.

    sometimes it means that the foot-bed is a sculpted 3D ‘negative’ of a foot – with lumps and bumps and hollows to accomodate the shape of your foot.

    sometimes it means that the squishy-ness of the sole varies across the sole, to modify the movement of your foot/ankle/etc – a bit like having a mattress with a stiff side for him, and a soft side for her.

    sometimes it means the way in which the shoe holds onto your foot.

    and/or combinations of the above.

    etc.

    your favourite old slippers – no support whatsover.

    new, stiff, walking boots with custom-fitted footbeds = lots of support.

    Try lots of things, don’t worry about it, stop if it hurts

    I’m going with the things that hurt less at the moment. 😉

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    I would say that if it hurts like sore exercised muscles, keep doing it but take it easy and build up slowly.

    If it hurts like you’ve properly injured something, then stop til it gets better and try again.

    If you keep injuring something, then do something else 🙂

    If you keep injuring something, then do something else

    That’s pretty much where it’s at. 🙁

    Pretty sure I know what causes it (over-pronation of the mid-foot, stretching and aggrevating the Flexor Digitorum Longus), so it’s just finding a way of preventing it.

    Just. 😉

    Premier Icon molgrips
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    Try forefoot striking?

    cynic-al
    Member

    Pieface – Member
    But back to the OP, if you used to change the shoes at 500, why 700 now?

    They are both estimates of my own mileage but more importantly what the shop told me I’d get out of the individual (different) shoes,

Viewing 23 posts - 46 through 68 (of 68 total)

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