Runners: Rucksacks, vest, bumbag things.

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  • Runners: Rucksacks, vest, bumbag things.
  • Killer
    Member

    Mountainbikeing and skiing for years, i’ve always used a rucksack of various types to carry extra layers, water, keys etc.

    Now i’ve been doing a bit more running, a backpack seems to be agood idea.
    I’ve seen people use bum bags and those weird vest things for carrying extra bits.

    I seem to struggle with rucksacks to date of stuff moving around and also them making my shirt ride up weirdly. Maybe technique is a bit to pot, but am i alone in finding rucksacks a bit of a pain.

    Any recommendations of good bags and things to avoid?

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    I use an OMM 3l bumbag for fell races and OMM15 if I ever need to carry more. Smaller would do but it makes it more useful in real life too. With a sac look for something that sits close to your back and cinches down without pinching.

    surfer
    Member

    Unless you are running somewhere that may in some way require you to call for help such as several hours on the fells for example where there is possibility of breaking something or getting seriously lost (although I think I would come close to death from exposure before calling out emergency services) then why do you need a bag, phone and to carry water?

    Pieface
    Member

    A sensible runner should be taking at least a hat, gloves, jacket and whistle if more than a 30 minute hobble from help – at this time of year anything that stops you moving quickly could risk hypothermia. For instance you may trip, bang your knee on a rock and put your hands in to a deep icy puddle. This happened to me a couple of years ago and it made me realise that it could have been very serious.

    Running on the roads isn’t excempt from risks either. An early morning run in tights nearly turned hypothermic when a hale storm 6 miles from home made me very cold.

    I’m thinking that vests are the best thing for carrying much gear, especially water as even a 300ml soft bottle in a bumbag makes it unwieldy, whereas a vest distributes the load much better.

    I’ve been looking for the ultimate bumbag but so far it doesn’t exist. It needs to be the simple Pete Bland Bumbag ith the addition of stretch mesh pockets on the side to carry gels.

    Pieface
    Member

    If you need to carry a lot of gear (e.g. as you’re commuting to work) then consider the smallest pack you can – you can get a lot of stuff in a 5 / 10ltr pack. Compression cords and careful packing are key. The smaller the better as there’s less room for stuff to move around, therefore get the smallest pack you need.

    surfer
    Member

    Clearly things are more risky now. I ran circa 70 mpw between the ages of 20 and 45 give or take a few injuries and other than the example I gave above I have never had to carry anything but a key.

    Marketing gone mad.

    Pieface
    Member

    Its not marketing, its safety

    surfer
    Member

    Get a grip

    Pieface
    Member

    If people want to carry kit that’s up to them, how does it affect you?

    surfer
    Member

    It irritates me to see the gearification of a simple sport and the introduction of “danger” into the most routine things. I am a bit “4 Yorkshireman” when it comes to running but I get sick of the constant need to invent reasons to buy kit. I overtook 3 runners on Sunday all with haversacks on and all running a much shorter run than me (I happen to know this) They also had drinks in bladders etc and the local jogging club have all started running with headlights and flashing armbands etc.
    Fools and their money

    Premier Icon allfankledup
    Subscriber

    Mrs has a Salomon vest that she uses for long,long trail runs.
    Carries full waterproofs, food, water, gloves, phone.

    Most races she enters now have a minimum kit list that they are all compelled to carry.
    Her peers have bought other types of vest previously, but are all gravitating towards the Salomon kit…. Clicky Link to Salomon Vest

    willard
    Member

    Karrimor make a rip-off of the Inov-8 race packs that are surprisingly good. I used one for marathon training and they seem to work and hold a decent amount of kit. They are also relatively light and come in bright colours.

    Pieface
    Member

    Agree that some people do carry excessive kit, but if they’re out there getting some exercise and enjoying themselves without causing any harm to others then its all good shirley?

    surfer
    Member

    You are the one recommending it!

    A sensible runner should be taking at least a hat, gloves, jacket and whistle if more than a 30 minute hobble from help – at this time of year anything that stops you moving quickly could risk hypothermia. For instance you may trip, bang your knee on a rock and put your hands in to a deep icy puddle.

    Pieface
    Member

    Yes based on my own experience and realisation that although in principle running is a simple sport, where I go running there is an element of risk and that a simple injury, such as a trip on anything could have serious implications. To minimise these I take a waterproof coat, a gel and foil vest as a minimum in the winter months. I have to carry it all during races so it makes sense to take it with me on my runs.

    As experienced as you are you must appreciate how quickly the weather can change in this country and that even when you are moving, if you start out in fair weather which turns in to a rain storm hypothermia is a very real risk. Carrying the kit allows me to keep on running and to enjoy being out there in the wild.

    fullauto
    Member

    Anything under an hour and I don’t see much point in taking anything, just extra faff.

    Last year I got a vest pack for doing longer fell type runs and it’s excellent (so of course they’ve discontinued it – Quechua extend 10 for reference, cheap and perfectly set out!). Principal advantage is that it doesn’t bounce around and the lack of waist strap means it doesn’t ride up. There’s enough storage for a phone, keys, water (on really long ones I have a bladder and a few soft flasks on the front), some snacks and a windproof – all of which should see you good for half a day out.

    Could get more layers etc in it if I needed but don’t really see the point.

    djtom
    Member

    Depends on what type of running you are doing. If you are up on the fells, take sensible kit. A point that takes you half an hour to get to could take you an awful lot longer to get back from if something nasty happens – cautionary tale here (I don’t know the guy, but proof of how easily things can go wrong on a route he obviously knows well)
    bad day out

    If I’m off somewhere remote I’ve got a Haglofs waist pack that holds a bottle and has a couple of pockets for phone, jelly babies, keys, spare layer etc. Windproof goes round the waist so I can pull it on/off without stopping.

    That said, if I’m off for anything up to 2 hours around the Surrey Hills, I won’t take anything except a front door key. You’re rarely more than 10 minutes from a pub, let alone a house!

    Camelbak Lobo here.

    I hate carrying things in my hands when running. Also dislike bumbags/waistband things. And I’m one of those that needs to keep properly hydrated. So I’ve used various rucksack/bladder combos over the years. Lobo is perfect.

    Pieface
    Member

    Reading that link he was never more than 10 minutes running time from a pub or village.

    Premier Icon angeldust
    Subscriber

    Fools and their money

    Always said by people that are insufferably tight.

    thecaptain
    Member

    I’ve got a great wee rucksack for running. Small and ridiculously flimsy/lightweight, but holds my waterproofs (top and legs) and just a little more besides. For 2h+ in the fells by myself, I’m taking proper kit. Got it free in an event goody bag (different one to where I got a nice little belt pouch thing). Hard to find something quite so flimsy in the shops, but the lightness is of course a bonus. Waist and chest straps prevent any bounce, I really don’t notice I’m wearing it.

    djglover
    Member

    Best running bumbag ever and I’ve tried a few, at least 4 in total

    https://www.peteblandsports.co.uk/products/pete-bland-bumbag.htm

    surfer
    Member

    Always said by people that are insufferably tight.

    I don’t think “always” means what you think it means.

    I have to carry it all during races so it makes sense to take it with me on my runs.

    Are you talking about FRA events?

    Edit: what djglover says. I can get all of the FRA kit into that. You don’t need it for running around local paths/fields/streets

    dovebiker
    Member

    The benefit of the ‘vest’ is that you can pull it tightly against your body (less bounce) and they tend to be lighter / more breathable than a small backpack. Really depends on how much you’re carrying – mine takes a 1.5 litre bladder which is good for a few hours, plus pouches for gels, jacket and stuff. I also use my Salomon S-lab for kayaking and recently used it for an arctic winter ultra fatbike race

    Premier Icon angeldust
    Subscriber

    I don’t think “always” means what you think it means.

    Is your best comeback a criticism of the usage of the word ‘always’. Is disappointed.

    Pieface
    Member

    Yes I race in FRA races

    I’ve been trying to decide on a good pack/vest for longer events, think I’m trying to get something to do too many differant jobs!
    I’ve used a Inov-8 waistpack in the past but it annoys me if overfilled and doesn’t sit right.

    When commuting I carry clothes in a Deuter Speedlite 15 (http://www.jackson-sports.com/en/Deuter-Speed-Llite-15/m-10162.aspx) I’ve used this for longer hill races, its comfortable & carrys the gear required but I’d like something more accessable for racing. Been looking at the Nathan Firecatcher pack, simple & lots of front storage but maybe too small for rear storage.

    I’d agree that people carry too much generally but its their choice. I like long runs with minimal gear – thats the great thing about running!

    The Fellmonkey hypothermia blog linked above is well worth a read, especially from someone experienced.

    We insist on minimum kit levels at all of the Scottish ultras, so for anyone north of the border thinking of doing a longer trail event/race, you might as well get used to carrying a kit bag anyway.
    Loads of folk find a simple, mid sized bumbag works just grand for them; keys, light jacket, phone. Plus cake tokens..
    The ‘vests’ are great for some folk but are maybe a bit much for others.
    Some will take it fully loaded every time they go out, regardless of distance, as it’s all good training. Others doing long, solo or small group, all day or overnight sessions will see it as absolutely vital to have a full set of kit in a decent bag.
    At events, I’ve been known to DQ folk for not following these rules.
    I’ve had to treat so many serious hypothermic runners over the years that I’m a bit of a crusader for taking proper kit.

    ross980
    Member

    I’ve found an old empty (i.e. bladder-less) 3l Camelbak classic really good for running home from work (only carrying keys, swipe cards, wallet and phones Anna occasionally a running jacket if I’ve misjudged the weather/temperature). I stick stuff in a plastic bag if it’s raining. I hardly notice it and have found it much better than the alternatives (bumbags and lightweight rucksack).

    digger95
    Member

    Decathlon do running vests, I like mine.
    I also really liked a Haglofs bum/waist bag but lost it πŸ™
    …It was much better designed to sit still (even with 500ml bottle etc in) than an inov8 bumbag i’ve got.

    Premier Icon stever
    Subscriber

    It irritates me to see the gearification of a simple sport and the introduction of “danger” into the most routine things. I am a bit “4 Yorkshireman” when it comes to running but I get sick of the constant need to invent reasons to buy kit.

    You know you’re on an MTB site?
    FWIW you’re not wrong tho πŸ™‚

    mrsfry
    Member

    I got the Camelbak bike thingy

    Feels great on the hips and i can fit all my bits and bobs inside. It’s a cycling bag, but what the heck, if it works it works.

    Ro5ey
    Member

    whats the differences between a …

    Ruckseack
    Backpack
    Napsack
    Haversack

    ???

    I dont know, but sounds like the start of joke

    Anyway

    On the gearification front … I agree with surfella… and use an old camelback when doing ultras …. it’s not like you are running fast enough when going long for the thing to be bouncing about. And on my 10k commute a small rucksack (i think, see above :D) with the straps over my neck on the opposite shoulder… goes no where when doing intervals

    paulosoxo
    Member

    local jogging club have all started running with headlights and flashing armbands etc.
    Fools and their money

    Quite possibly due to the clubs insurance? Sounds like responsible pack leading if the ‘joggers’ in question are new. Your use of ‘jogger’ also suggests that you’re so much better than running than them. Well done you. Xx.

    I use one of these on longer jaunts..

    Decathlon

    mrsfry
    Member

    I use a light when i run. What with Ninjas, being dark, dog walkers, motorbikes and being able to do the ‘dog poop shuffle’ I’m taking my darn Petz light.

    Why are people so down on other peoples enjoyment!? I guess you chaps run in plimsolls and woolen garments like in ye olde days πŸ™„

    Do the ladys have to toss the bras and just strap their boobs with bandages instead.

    Do you chaps ride your penny farthings to the race or walk to the location over a period of days, then sleep in a hedge overnight to be ready for the race.

    surfer
    Member

    Quite possibly due to the clubs insurance? Sounds like responsible pack leading if the ‘joggers’ in question are new. Your use of ‘jogger’ also suggests that you’re so much better than running than them. Well done you. Xx.

    Nope nothing to do with insurance. I am better at running than them but “jogging” isnt a derogatory term. They dont appear interested in performance just getting out for a run. Good luck to them but their lights are a pita.

    Premier Icon molgrips
    Subscriber

    Surfer, if you object to gratification the you are absolutely within your rights to not take gear and accept a consequential level of risk. However the op does not have to accept the same level of risk just because YOU did when you were younger. You’re not even trying to persuade us of the benefits of less kit, you are just criticising and moaning.

    There are even first hand testaments on here to the benefits of gear, and you are still complaining. Why? Why do you give a crap what the OP carries? There is no need for the negative waves.

    Oh and, for those whose shirts ride up when running with a pack – tuck it in. It works.

    Premier Icon nickc
    Subscriber

    I’m sort of with Surfer, I take the minimum I can get away with BUT: I live in the Pennines and in winter I’m very grateful for the technology of a good waterproof that squishes down to the size of an apple, and a skull cap that fit into a bum bag that will also carry a water bottle and my phone, exists.

    cheer up surfer, don’t forget, soon you’ll be dead… πŸ˜†

    surfer
    Member

    Surfer, if you object to gratification the you are absolutely within your rights to not take gear and accept a consequential level of risk. However the op does not have to accept the same level of risk just because YOU did when you were younger

    It is a risk that does not exist. It is purely man made and reinforced to some extent within this thread. We are largely in agreement that venturing out onto the fells often requires some consideration and given the nature of the terrain (and the fact that large periods will be spent climbing slowly) mean that carrying a bag makes sense for food and a couple of items of clothing.
    If you are saying that there is now a need to carry such items on a run around the streets, along with emergency rations and various types of lighting then I would say thats ridiculous.

    cheer up surfer, don’t forget, soon you’ll be dead…

    Thanks Nick I am a naturally cheerful soul πŸ™‚

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