Viewing 40 posts - 1,841 through 1,880 (of 1,902 total)
  • Rugby 2021-2022 Season
  • pk13
    Full Member

    Half time.
    IRL are playing very well but NZ are playing against themselves ive never seen so many handling errors from an all black side.
    Let’s hope the English team are watching on how to play rugby

    dantsw13
    Free Member

    If I could pick one side to close that out with pure guts, it would’ve been Ireland. Awesome display.

    Caher
    Full Member

    Wow!

    Kryton57
    Full Member

    Amazing display of Rugby, absolutely deserved. 👏👏👏👏

    pk13
    Full Member

    First half was good second was pure class from IRL taking the pressure in the first 20 mins of the second half.
    Not just scraping the win they took NZ apart.

    desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    What a match! Well done Ireland, incredible series win!

    olddog
    Full Member

    Awesome. Ireland worthy of that win. NZ were only in the game during the yellow card period. Absolutely nails performance

    Was a pretty good game as well

    TBH apart from 30 minutes in the first test and the odd bit Ireland were the better side across the series

    pk13
    Full Member

    Have IRL really won 5/8 games against NZ??

    gauss1777
    Free Member

    Wow! Well done Ireland- that is something seriously impressive. I think if I was Irish I would have been very uneasy after the NZ try early in the second half.
    For a good while after Farrell’s appointment I was unconvinced he would be successful – I could not have been more wrong. They have a formidable team, with depth, and a clear plan of play. I guess their only weakness at present is their reliance on Sexton.
    C’mon England now 😀

    duckman
    Full Member

    That was something else! Well done the Irish.

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    Awesome from Ireland!

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    Just unbelievable. Have seen them blow so many half-time leads, especially in NZ. After those two early second-half tries, I was bricking it. But to see Herring go for the early break off the back (which most admitted they thought was the wrong thing to do) and go over with four of them trying to stop him to steady the ship was just glorious. Can’t wait for the NZ papers tomorrow. 🟢⚪️🟢 😀

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Are you drunk yet DD?

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    Saving myself for the All Ireland hurling final tomorrow TeeJ. No doubt you’ll not have missed some of the build up this week. 😀

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    Oh and I know this is probably a bit naughty in the spirit of the game but I just love this guy. 😂

    Kryton57
    Full Member

    England very second rate, and Jones pulls Care off. There’s another Jones/Care argument coming!

    olddog
    Full Member

    Weird game. Very disjointed. Both sides dropping the ball like it’s greasy.

    Kryton57
    Full Member

    Northern Hemisphere 2 from 2 – cmon Wales!!!!

    Would love to see the video of Genge running over Kerebi again.

    olddog
    Full Member

    Much better second half, England deserved that

    The final turnover by England was an old-fashioned rucked ball – not seen that in years

    desperatebicycle
    Free Member

    Oh yes, still no central threat from England… all about that Marcus Smith try really. Plus fantastic defence. They did it!
    Now for Wales to get the trio! 😀

    reeksy
    Full Member

    Nervy though! We barely held the ball in the second half. Some strong defence.

    olddog
    Full Member

    Aus did far to much one up running I think – especially given their pace on the wings. Watching this game after Ireland v AB shows a real gap in adventure in style of play. Ireland really mix up their game

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Unless i am missing the subtleties Ireland are playing pretty conventionally. No great amount of fancy moves. Just doing it very well with very few errors and making the right passes

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    Oh I nearly forgot, I guess Ireland end today #1 in world rankings? 😀

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Yes and well deserved

    Pigface
    Free Member

    Congratulations Ireland turning the world on its head. Fantastic performance.

    Now fingers crossed for Cape Town.

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    I mean, I’ll take it, but oh my, Porter was very lucky I think.

    Caher
    Full Member

    I mean, I’ll take it, but oh my, Porter was very lucky I think.

    Agreed. Looked too similar to the reds given last week.

    olddog
    Full Member

    Pitch in SA is shocking. It’s like someone has laid turf on a beach

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    Fair play Wales, hopelessly outclassed but stayed in the fight..this Wainwright kid at 3…gave loads of pens away and all but for someone who managed just 8 appearances for Ampthill last season just surviving was a bonus. North played well too which was nice to see. Loosing Falatau before kick off and Lydiate early was a blow.

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    I mean, I’ll take it, but oh my, Porter was very lucky I think.

    I think it was Aki who took out the replacement 3 with a shoulder to head in a ruck was also lucky, it didn’t even get looked at.

    duckman
    Full Member

    I was going to lament Scotland throwing away a 15 point lead but then read about Ryan Jones being diagnosed with early onset dementia. As somebody who’s Mother has no idea who I am, there is no point wishing him a good fight/health etc as it doesn’t work like that. Poor man,just 41 with 6 kids to look after.

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    That Saturday evening in Dunedin 17 years ago, Ryan Jones seemed more force of nature than rugby player. He was 24, he’d just worn the British & Irish Lions shirt for the first time, scored a try, made a try and snaffled all the important turnovers. Without him, the Lions might not have beaten Otago.

    He was, of course, man of the match and as he sat down in the press conference room under Carisbrook Stadium, he wolfed down a slice of pizza. Like a kid hungry for the world he’d broken into. There wasn’t one person in the room who didn’t warm to the young No 8. Jones went on to enjoy a terrific career with 75 Tests for Wales, three for the Lions, three grand slams, one as captain. He skippered Wales on 33 occasions, a record at the time.

    We meet now at The Groaker, Rhiwbina, a restaurant about three miles north of Cardiff city centre. He arrives with Charley, his partner, and seeing him now it is easy to recall the tyro who terrorised Otago that evening. Six feet five and almost 18 stones back then, he still looks strong and athletic.

    Over coffee he begins to talk about his life now. Especially, his fears for the future. “I feel like my world is falling apart. And I am really scared. Because I’ve got three children and three step-children and I want to be a fantastic dad,” he says.

    “I lived 15 years of my life like a superhero and I’m not. I don’t know what the future holds.

    “I am a product of an environment that is all about process and human performance. I’m not able to perform like I could. And I just want to lead a happy, healthy, normal life. I feel that’s been taken away and there’s nothing I can do. I can’t train harder, I can’t play the referee, I don’t know what the rules of the game are anymore.”

    As he says this, he breaks down. Tears fill his eyes. Ryan Jones is 41 and another former rugby player with a serious brain injury. He received the diagnosis in December. Early onset dementia, probable chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). They told him he was one of one of the worst cases they have seen, and they have seen many.

    We walk to somewhere quieter, down Lon-Y-Dail road, left onto Lon Isa, another left to a little green area surrounded by houses. It is a warm summer’s day in Cardiff and on the grass he sits with Charley by his side. He then explains how he has ended up in this place.

    There wasn’t any headline-grabbing moment, he says, where he realised he was in trouble. Rather a slow realisation that something was amiss. At first he tried to tell himself it was nothing: everyone forgets things, every former player struggles after retirement, everyone has down moments, until he couldn’t run away from it anymore. “I think the understanding came a few years ago through conversations with people close to me,” he says.

    “Whether it was partner or family, they were noticing changes in me. I was diagnosed with depression and I started to realise that some of my cognitive function wasn’t great. I began to see that my short-term memory wasn’t great. I was forgetting things.”

    What a doctor saw as depression was a symptom, not a cause. “Ryan would say to me, ‘I don’t think I am [depressed],’ ” Charley says. “He couldn’t explain. He would say, ‘I can’t articulate it Charley but there’s something not right. It’s not depression, it’s something else.’

    “He would say things like, ‘My head just feels full,’ and he would have physical symptoms: headaches and eye problems often. And obviously these things are getting worse, but he would say, ‘I can’t get the words out.’ What we’ve certainly noticed the last couple of years is everything getting slower. He gets more anxious that he can’t get his words and he can’t put sentences together.

    “We were talking about this the other day, Ryan was the Wales captain and he thrived under pressure. Now any form of stress he can’t cope with at all. And there’s an emotional cost to that. And he will just go really within himself — almost catatonic — to a point where he just has to be left alone in a dark room.”

    He can’t avoid the moments that remind him of what he’s losing. He tells of doing an event with former Welsh player Sean Holley in . . . and he stops while trying to recall the town. Aberystwyth. Holley recalled incidents that happened in games, big moments they had shared on the pitch and as Jones listened, he couldn’t remember any of this. “It’s wasn’t like, ‘Ah, I now remember that.’ It’s like absolutely no recollection.”

    Another recent moment cut him to the quick. For some time he’d been telling the kids that he’s got to take them to Pen y Fan, the highest peak in South Wales. And then, even more recently, he’s going through old stuff and he sees photos of himself and the kids on Pen y Fan: “I had been on about desperately wanting to take the kids to Pen y Fan and do the mountain, because they’d never done it, and I don’t look at the photo and [think] ‘Ah, I remember now,’ because I don’t.”

    There are conversations now that he will soon forget. Things that he and Charley agreed that he doesn’t recall. That is upsetting for him as the absence of any recall leaves him convinced the original conversation can’t have taken place. “There’s been times I’ve recorded stuff,” she says. “Because I know he will forget it and he will challenge me — ‘I didn’t say that, I didn’t even have that conversation’ — and it will be something important. ‘You did darling, this is it [the recording].’ There’s a genuine, complete blank of memory, and it’s not until I show him something, and he can see it’s me and he trusts that I am being honest with him. It’s the short- term memory. The best way I can describe Ryan — it’s like having a conversation with my 85-year-old grandad.”

    At first they would joke about the things he forgot; laughter was their way of coping. They knew they were in denial but didn’t want to have the conversation. Then came what Charley calls “the dark episodes”.

    “Ryan got to a place where he thought, ‘Well, this is impacting on everyone else’s lives, especially the children’s lives’ and he knew he had to explore what had gone wrong,” she says. “The dark times were where he would get almost to the point of wanting to scream at this thing that he couldn’t explain to me. ‘Charley I can’t even talk, I haven’t got the capacity to talk about it.’”

    They now pick up on the signs of a coming-down period and take precautions. Though he will try to function normally, it is a struggle and it’s a particular concern if his low mood overlaps with time he’s spending with the kids. Thirty-six hours is how long they last, though with this illness nothing stays the same.

    “We don’t know where to go, where to find support,” Jones says. “We haven’t got any friends in this space. It terrifies me because I don’t know if, in two years’ time, we’re sat here and these episodes are a week long, two weeks long or permanent. That’s the fear, that’s the bit that never leaves. That’s the bit I can’t shake off.

    “Every episode I have also leaves a bit of a legacy. Everything we cancel, every relationship that I poison or don’t have time for anymore, just makes it a little bit tougher to cope. I don’t know how to slow that down, make it stop, what to do.”

    Charley says the young Ryan she got to know at Cardiff University 20 years ago is no more. She sees a big change. Back then he was the eternal optimist, the guy who believed things would work out. Now there is almost constant anxiety about meeting strangers, about people judging him, about what kind of dad he’s going to be.

    The diagnosis was unambiguous. Early onset dementia, probable CTE and yet, at last, clarity. “The stress of not knowing was becoming too big. There is a relief in diagnosis,” he says.

    “There was a grief in diagnosis,” Charley says. “I don’t know if Ryan recognised this or not, because we haven’t really spoken about it. There was an, ‘Ah f***, it’s actually true,’ and I think there was part of him that was desperately hoping that the neurologist might say, ‘You’re fine, you’re one of the lucky ones.’ ”

    They asked the neurologist about the future. He said the rate at which things deteriorated over the past five years is likely to continue.

    After the diagnosis came the most difficult thing. Telling the children. Jacob is just 12, a keen and very good rugby player. A mini version of Ryan. His dad is his hero. He asked if there was a treatment that would make things better. Then he wondered about his own rugby. His dad said that it was a conversation they needed to have.

    “Do I want to be a father in ten years, or if Charley is left to pick up the pieces, having a conversation with my son when he’s 30, going, ‘Guess what, you’ve trodden the same path as your dad’? We knew all along and we didn’t stop you and boy do we wish we had. I couldn’t live with that.”

    Since the diagnosis, he’s shared the news with his family and closest friends, but not with the men he once soldiered with.

    Since the diagnosis, he’s shared the news with his family and closest friends, but not with the men he once soldiered with.

    “I am not sure what their personal circumstances are,” he says. “Maybe on the back of this, people will reach out to me if they’re concerned. I think that would be the one positive. I would love that, because we could just share. It’s probably my ego as well. I had great times.

    “The other thing is I probably realised the changing room hasn’t been there for me either. This idea of ‘everyone is mates’ is not the case. We were people who pulled together with a common cause, we shared some fantastic moments together but we’ve gone our different ways now. I am torn on the game, you know. [There’s] still a part of me that loves it.

    “I was a kid who had a dream of playing for Wales. I got to live that dream. I captained Wales more times than anyone else until Warby [Sam Warburton] came along and I wouldn’t change,” he says and then pauses. “Actually I would change it based on my experience now. But in the moment it was amazing.”

    As for the game and its response to brain injury, he is unequivocal: “It is walking headlong with its eyes closed into a catastrophic situation.”

    anagallis_arvensis
    Full Member

    Should we be watching this, should I take my son to training next month?

    Kryton57
    Full Member

    Should we be watching this, should I take my son to training next month?

    I’ve had very similar thoughts.

    gordimhor
    Full Member

    That’s a very bleak and honest article. My mum also has dementia. Rugby needs to do something it may well mean fundamental changes in the game.

    deadlydarcy
    Free Member

    I’ve had very similar thoughts.

    +1

    I coach (along with three other dads) my lad’s U9 group. Going into U10 next season will bring a little more contact. We’re doing our absolute best to teach them proper tackle technique, etc. But I still see a lot of “old school” coaches that just want the hit first, we’ll worry about technique later. I’m very very conflicted about whether we continue this as a family, going forward. I’ve already seen kids with poor technique get bonked when they go to tackle a bigger kid and just bounce off. We’ve done all the courses relevant to our age grades but there are still absolutely terrible coaches out there, often ex-players who played in the bad old days.

    I really don’t know what to do. I love seeing him have the experience of a team sport, the camaraderie etc. but I feel like I’m sticking him into a lottery where if he’s unlucky, the outcome could be very bad indeed.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Its shite being a Scotland fan

    gordimhor
    Full Member

    @tja This is true. However we can take the misery. It’s the hope that kills you.

    tjagain
    Full Member

    Too true

Viewing 40 posts - 1,841 through 1,880 (of 1,902 total)

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