• This topic has 13 replies, 9 voices, and was last updated 1 week ago by boblo.
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  • Roadie tubes: light vs normal weight – puncture protection vs sharp objects?
  • yohandsome
    Member

    Typically glass. Thing is that most 80 mm valve stem tubes are light versions (e.g. from schwalbe or conti), wondering if I should just go with them and let the tire do the puncture protection, or try to find thicker tubes. I’d prefer to just get Schwalbe’s SV20 as they’re the cheapest and most available here + they have a dark valve stem. This is for training and getting around town.

    I’d think there wouldn’t be too much difference as if something penetrates the tire, the tube doesn’t stand much of a chance anyways, but might be wrong.

    Premier Icon simondbarnes
    Subscriber

    Plenty of standard tubes available with 80mm valves. Bontrager and Specialized to name two.

    yohandsome
    Member

    And Hutchinson, but they seem so so quality. If there isn’t that much to gain in terms of stabbing wound protection I’d just go with Schwalbe’s dark stem valve tube which is the cheapest and most avail around here.

    I’ve had a pair of Vittoria latex tubes for ~20 months, rolled well and very light, just a pita that they would lose ~15+ psi over a ride of ~3 hours!

    Got a set of Conti Supersonics to try under a new pair of GP5000s, in current circumstances on week off I’m deliberating whether to fit them now rather than post apocalypse.

    Premier Icon Simon E
    Subscriber

    The SV20 is classed as ‘ultra light’ but I can’t imagine anyone else’s standard butyl tubes being more resistant to sharp objects that have gone through a tyre.

    If you really want to avoid punctures then perhaps get some tougher tyres such as Durano Plus.

    Premier Icon bob_summers
    Subscriber

    I always thought latex tubes punctured less readily, should something get through the tyre. Might’ve just been my perception.
    But they tend to go bang instead of going down slowly so you can at least get to a safe place to fix it (or last til you get home). Usually ride tubs though, also latex.

    yohandsome
    Member

    Going with the SV20s + GP5000s (81g for the 80 mm ones), no problems during installation, the black valve stems are nice..

    boblo
    Member

    I’ve been using Supersonics or other manufacturers equivalents for years with Ultremos, Ones and GP4000s. I get the occasional puncture but the tyres aren’t Marathons so to be expected. When I say ‘occasional’ I mean a couple of times a year riding that set up probably 2-3k miles p/a.

    I wouldn’t worry about it.

    Premier Icon lunge
    Subscriber

    I’ve always used Conti Light tubes on my best road bike which are a touch heavier then Supersonic but lighter than their normal tubes. They work well for me, the occasional puncture but they’re few and far between and I run thin tyres too.

    yohandsome
    Member

    Sounds good, se how the GP5000s hold up, durability doesn’t seem great but heard good things about puncture protection apart from sidewalls being weak.

    Really doesn’t seem to be a big downside to running thinner version road tubes, maybe that’s why some companies like schwalbe and conti only sell thin versions with long valve stems?

    continuity
    Member

    The ultralight butyl tubes are good for one thing only: placing in your saddlebag in case of puncture. This is only because latex tubes are sensitive to being rammed away and crushed and punctured by sharp things when not inflated.

    Unless you’re commuting through a city (in which case, honestly, I’d be on tubeless with sealant), road bikes should be shod in Latex tubes. 5 watts per wheel, significantly more comfortable ride, more grip, and fewer punctures than thin butyl.

    boblo
    Member

    @continuity You say that as if it’s fact not opinion.

    I choose butyl over latex as I don’t want to pump up before each ride and I may want to repair whilst out on a ride if I have used both my spare tubes. That’s more important to me than the theoretical 5w. However, I’m happy to take the measurable ~50g weightsaving over standard tubes.

    Premier Icon thisisnotaspoon
    Subscriber

    road bikes should be shod in Latex tubes. 5 watts per wheel,

    Hate to burst your ultralight latex bubble, but it’s more like 1W, or 2W if you cherry pick results and compare it to a standard heavy tube rather than the butyl one of the same weight.

    https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/specials/schwalbe-one-tubeless-clincher

    Interestingly that test didn’t include Conti Supersonic’s which are even lighter. If the trend carries on (i.e. knock the same amount off for the reduced thickness) they might probably be the same.

    Only problem I’ve ever had with conti supersonics (I don’t think they puncture noticeably more than normal) is the valves are too easy to rip off the tube, so the 30g saving is offset against having to either only use CO2 (which brings up the argument of do you carry CO2 and a pump, even more weight, or rely on club mates if you have a nightmare) or a physically bigger pump with a hose (also more than the 60g weight saved over ‘normal lightweight’ tubes heavier).

    Tubless OTOH is a revelation, yes it might be 1.5W slower per wheel, but you’d have to be very lucky not to lose more time than that fixing punctures over the life of a tyre!

    boblo
    Member

    Oi spoon! Get lost! This thread is for tube devotees not tubeless evangelists…! 😁

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