Road: Saddle and seatpost for weight weenies

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  • Road: Saddle and seatpost for weight weenies
  • cynic-al
    Member

    New saddle only – that seatpost isn’t too heavy.

    BTW that’s an expensive way to lose weight, and don’t assume that your frame is light because it’s carbon.

    Selle Italia SLR saddle, weigh around 130g-180g depending on version.
    KCNC scandium posts are pretty light, but IIRC set a weight limit.

    dickie
    Member

    I’ve got a Selle Italia SLR XP saddle, used once, as new, white, 180g, £40 posted.

    Email address in profile.

    Its the same frame that runs up to the pro-level and builds into a sub 6.4kg bike, its currently over 8.5kg i think, mostly the weight is in the wheels but I don’t like the saddle anyway so dropping some weight there makes sense.

    Lightest seatpost option seems to be the ritchey superlogic but they are about 100 pounds

    Premier Icon flange
    Subscriber

    Without wanting to sound like a standard stw smart arse, you won’t get super light without spending some serious money.

    Have a look at tune stuff for silly light post and saddle. Not cheap though. As mentioned, kcnc do light and for decent money.

    As you’ve already noted, most of the weight is probably in the wheels. I’d spend my money there for the biggest differences. Although I would say that as I’m selling my carbon wheels 😉

    crikey
    Member

    …and if you weigh your bike and then yourself, then add the two together, you can see what a small proportion of the total weight you are managing to lose.

    mrmo
    Member

    light, strong, cheap pick two.

    If you want to save weight you won’t save much on a per component, it is the sum that matters.

    Campagnolo Athena rear mech 209grams c£120
    Campagnolo super record rear mech 155grams c£360

    Doesn’t sound that much but if you save 50 grams on a rear mech 30 on a front mech, 50 on the brakes, 50 on the hubs etc etc.

    Saving 100grams on a saddle doesn’t sound much but if you look at the slightly bigger picture it all adds up.

    The big picture is look at yourself first, how much extra weight are you carrying?

    cynic-al
    Member

    Since when is 8.5kg heavy?

    So Ive got all weight weenie recently after finding how much heavier my road bike is than other peoples. Mostly the extra weight seems to be made up by my wheels and finishing kit. The frame and fork are carbon and im running an ultegra groupset so nothing too porky.

    Im just after some thoughts on reliable saddles and seatposts at a resonable price that can help drop some weight on the bike. The current setup is a basic ritchey alloy seatpost and a in-house branded saddle all up weighing in at 600g (250g for seatpost and 350g for saddle).

    Im terms of saddles I like the Selle Italia flite and SDG bell air for MTB but neither are much of a weight saving choice.

    Premier Icon muddydwarf
    Subscriber

    I bought a Kore (sp?) saddle and carbon seatpost combo for my road bike to replace the ritchey post and saddle (whose brand i cant remember) from crc.
    cost £51 in the sale and saved around 200 grams according to my kitchen scales. In truth i bought it because i didn’t like the original saddle.

    Its one of the I-beam jobbies btw.

    mudsux
    Member

    That’s over 2Kg weight difference between the pro-spec and yours.

    Shimano running gear is generally heavier than the equivilant in Campag or SRAM. That might account for a few hundred grammes there.

    Allowing for a few hundred grammes on the finishing kit.

    Which means you have some very heavy wheels (relative to the pro-spec bike)?

    Incidently, Zipp 404s apparently weigh just under 1500g.

    Premier Icon curiousyellow
    Subscriber

    My Scott weighs over 10kg. I don’t think anyone would call your bike heavy.
    I’d buy a Selle, but that’s because I have one on my MTB.

    Pictures of current bike?

    plus one
    Member

    As above a selle italia slr(Ti or carbon railed version) check out the bay or pop a wanted ad up here 135g that’s 1/2lb gone already ..

    Wheels is the obvious one what wheels are you running ?? Mid range shimano rs-80’s are good weight for the money..

    Or some really light Chinese carbon clinchers if you want to spend a bit more ..

    mudsux
    Member

    Quoted bike weights are also without pedals.

    Allow 300g for those.

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    Its the same frame that runs up to the pro-level and builds into a sub 6.4kg bike, its currently over 8.5kg

    Are you a Pro?
    Is it hurting you?
    Does the number matter more than the impact?

    You either need sponsored, a load of cash or some dodgy scales.

    Premier Icon YoKaiser
    Subscriber

    If you like a Flite then the SLR is a good call. Fair weight saving too. Ideally you’d get all your component weights and go from there, what tyres and tubes are you running? CRC have a good price on a 150gr Maxxis tyre at the moment, that for something so light gets fair press from users. Another bargain is the kalloy uno 9 stem on ebay, £20 and around 100gr depending on length. I agree that your post isn’t too bad a weight, do you have any excess that can be trimmed off?

    glupton1976
    Member

    Jesus wept.

    boblo
    Member

    Jesus wept…. when he weighed his new kit and found it wasn’t as light as the manufacturers had lead him to believe (yeah you Deda)…. 🙂

    nick1962
    Member

    I’m really not bothered about my bike weight as you can see.I prefer comfort.

    Not pro but am racing in crits, and heavy wheels and components make a big difference. Im not overweight, probably about 7% body-fat or thereabouts so I haven’t got weight to lose.

    Like someone said its losing weight in small amounts throughout the bike, Im not trying for super-light but at the bikes current weight i know i should be able to lose enough to make a fair difference. Im pretty sure I can lose 500g in wheels alone which is going to make a big difference.

    Oh a BTW i was riding a heavy alloy disk braked cyclocross bike before i moved to this, and my average speeds improved massively (4kph) moving to a carbon road bike, so don’t tell me its not about the bike!

    tarquin
    Member

    The accelerations and efforts required to spin up heavy wheels will be a killer in Crits.

    Also almost every other rider will have a 7kg bike, why would you handicap yourself if you didn’t have to?

    JonEdwards
    Member

    Saddle is easy savings – as others have said Selle SLR 135. Light, not too expensive and very comfortable if your arse is the right shape.

    Posts – you’ll only save 50g or so (75g at best) for “normal” non-utter weenie kit. Thomson Masterpiece, KCNC, Ritchey WCS etc.

    If you’re doing crits and want a cheap save – I’ve been running Bontrager XXX tubes for years with very few problems. They’re 1/2 the weight of a typical Spesh tube and do make the bike pick up a hair quicker. A tenner for a tube is expensive, but not for a 50g weight loss…

    Premier Icon PePPeR
    Subscriber

    As mentioned above, rotational weight is the worst I’d be making sure I have the lightest wheels I can possibly get before starting on anywhere else, a gram saved at the rim equals a 2 gram saving iirc!

    Premier Icon mikewsmith
    Subscriber

    treefingerlongboards – Member – Quote
    Not pro but am racing in crits, and heavy wheels and components make a big difference. Im not overweight, probably about 7% body-fat or thereabouts so I haven’t got weight to lose.

    Big of context helps lots 🙂
    If your racing with a big group then chances are someone has taken a nice post out of a new bike as they have a nicer one already – see if there are some “shop soiled” ones with the racers. If you really want to get the weight down it’s a spreadsheet and some scales/research see what actually gets you the better £/g return. Again I’d be looking for some take off wheels from someone up the field a bit or sponsored/supported cast offs.

    crikey
    Member

    heavy wheels and components make a big difference

    The accelerations and efforts required to spin up heavy wheels will be a killer in Crits

    .

    How big is this big difference? If it’s big, you’ll have some numbers to put on it, right?

    …and conservation of momentum means that heavy things keep spinning for longer…

    …and the accelerations are actually tiny, as is the difference in weight, as is the performance benefit.

    Physics works the same for bicycles as it does everywhere else.

    tarquin
    Member

    Heavy things may well spin for longer, but that’s no help when you need to accelerate from 35 to 40kmh in a hurry.

    So what is the performance benefit of going from a 2400g wheel tyre combo to a 1700g one? Compared to saving 100g off a saddle I would imagine its huge…

    crikey
    Member

    Again with the embiggening words.

    If it’s that huge, it’s measurable, so tell me what the difference is?

    The whole point is that you are not accelerating the wheels alone; you’re accelerating the whole bike + you combination, so losing 700 grams means nothing from an all up weight of 80-90-100 kgs.

    use the internet, go and look at the physics, look at how much difference it actually makes in the real world.

    Try here to start with; http://www.analyticcycling.com/WheelsCritCorner_Page.html

    brakes
    Member

    At the end of 100 m Test Rider is ahead by 0.09 s and 70299.00 m.

    not sure I trust that modeller crikey!

    crikey
    Member

    not sure I trust that modeller crikey!

    At least he is trying to model it, instead of saying the difference is ‘huge’ or ‘enormous’ or any other of the hyperbolic phrases that people trot out when attempting to justify their latest purchase.

    TiRed
    Member

    has a nice discussion of wheel performance with some perspective. Worth a read.

    Seatposts aren’t really a place to save a lot of weight. A bit like stems. Most are fairly light already. Cut the unused part off if you must. Says he who’s 7 kilo Ultegra has an integrated seat post 😉 . Wheels can save a lot of weight.

    Buy the nicest lowest rolling resistance tyres you can afford and fit 50g inner tubes.

    tarquin
    Member

    So according to the article you want a good aero wheel with excellent condition bearings to help reduce the power required to travel at a set speed.

    However light wheels account only for a small increase overall.

    A lot of articles quote rider total weight. Isn’t rider minimum weight compared to actual more important?

    Example. Wiggins was his lightest when he won the tdf at say 71kg. He’s now porked up to 81kg as he wants to produce more power.

    If he could save 1kg through light wheels and tyres that’s a free 10% improvement without having to diet?

    atlaz
    Member

    But losing 1kg of bodyweight is cheaper 😉

    PeterPoddy
    Member

    Since when is 8.5kg heavy?

    Well I’ve got an off the shelf, £1150, Trek Madone 2.3 with an alloy frame that’s only 8.9kg with 2 bottle cages on it.

    atlaz
    Member

    I have chinese carbon seatposts that weigh 141g with all the fittings mounted. My SLR saddle weighs 182g. I could probably get the weight down further but the costs are astronomical for minimal weight savings.

    My biggest area for improvement is wheels as with most. Oddly I assumed that my 105 brakes could be made lighter but when I weighed things, swapping my tubes and tyres out for lighter ones saved 400g and cost very little compared to new brakes. For reference, tyres+tubes cost me 15p per gram saving, wheels would be about 50p per gram and brakes about 80p per gram.

    I’ll only bother upgrading wheels, if at all but that’ll get me down to 7kg with cages and pedals.

    Have you been fitted?

    I see lots of people riding around with spacers under their stems who I’m assuming havent been fitted.

    Remove these and you’ve got yourself a faster cycling position.

    Also, get some deep section carbon wheels for even better aerodynamics

    atlaz
    Member

    I see lots of people riding around with spacers under their stems who I’m assuming havent been fitted.

    Why would you assume that? Maybe they have been fitted and rather than a massive riser on a slammed stem, they opted for spacers. Fittings aren’t all about optimal power, they’re often about making sure you FIT on a bike (see what I did there) and that means being comfortable too.

    sputnik
    Member

    OP, I have an ‘as new’ one ride old Selle Italia carbon railed SLR Team in white on the classifieds atm.
    Weight of 135g
    http://singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/slr-team-carbon-rails-in-white-1-ride-old-65-posted#post-5359574

    brakes
    Member

    I think davidtaylforth may be taking the proverbial.

    DanW
    Member

    As you can probably tell STW isn’t the place for asking questions about bike weights 😀 Weightweenies will give you far more sensible answers.

    The lightest Weightweenie saddle and seatpost is around 130g all in so start there and work up to something that is practical for you. My pick would be a tuned Thomson Masterpiece (~140g) and whichever of a Selle Italia SLR/ Specialized Toupe/ Bontrager XXX or similar suits you best (~140g). That should save you around 320g which in weightweenies terms is massive. Attention to detail gets a low overall weight bike and patience with picking up bargains gets it cheaply 😀 Price-wise, “don’t race what you can’t replace”!

    Does weight matter in the grand scheme of things? Probably not too much- most of the pro- tour road bikes are around 7.5kg although it does feel damn nice riding a light bike 😀

Viewing 39 posts - 1 through 39 (of 39 total)

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